Maestros and Their Music

The Art and Alchemy of Conducting

Author: John Mauceri

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 272

View: 536

An exuberant, uniquely accessible, beautifully illustrated look inside the enigmatic art and craft of conducting, from a celebrated conductor whose international career has spanned half a century. John Mauceri brings a lifetime of experience to bear in an unprecedented, hugely informative, consistently entertaining exploration of his profession, rich with anecdotes from decades of working alongside the greatest names of the music world. With candor and humor, Mauceri makes clear that conducting is itself a composition: of legacy and tradition, techniques handed down from master to apprentice--and more than a trace of ineffable magic. He reveals how conductors approach a piece of music (a calculated combination of personal interpretation, imagination, and insight into the composer's intent); what it takes to communicate solely through gesture, with sometimes hundreds of performers at once; and the occasionally glamorous, often challenging life of the itinerant maestro. Mauceri, who worked closely with Leonard Bernstein for eighteen years, studied with Leopold Stokowski, and was on the faculty of Yale University for fifteen years, is the perfect guide to the allure and theater, passion and drudgery, rivalries and relationships of the conducting life.

For the Love of Music

A Conductor's Guide to the Art of Listening

Author: John Mauceri

Publisher: Knopf

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 224

View: 452

With a lifetime of experience, profound knowledge and understanding, and heartwarming appreciation, an internationally celebrated conductor and teacher answers the questions: Why should I listen to classical music? How can I get the most from the listening experience? A protégée of Leonard Bernstein--his colleague for eighteen years--and an eminent conductor who has toured and recorded all over the world, John Mauceri helps us to reap the joys and pleasures classical music has to offer. Briefly, we learn the way a musical tradition born in ancient Greece, embraced by the Roman Empire, and subsequently nurtured by influences from across the globe, gave shape to the classical music that came to be embraced by cultures from Japan to Bolivia. Then Mauceri examines the music itself, helping us understand what it is we hear when we listen to classical music: how, by a kind of sonic metaphor, it expresses the deepest recesses of human feeling and emotion; how each piece bears the traces of its history; how the concert experience--a unique one each and every time--allows us to discover music anew. Unpretentious, graceful, instructive, this is a book for the aficionado, the novice, and anyone looking to have the love of music fired within them.

Music as Alchemy

Journeys with Great Conductors and their Orchestras

Author: Tom Service

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 304

View: 851

How are conductors' silent gestures magicked into sound by a group of more than a hundred brilliant but belligerent musicians? The mute choreography of great conductors has fascinated and frustrated musicians and music-lovers for centuries. Orchestras can be inspired to the heights of musical and expressive possibility by their maestros, or flabbergasted that someone who doesn't even make a sound should be elevated to demigod-like status by the public. This is the first book to go inside the rehearsal rooms of some of the most inspirational orchestral partnerships in the world - how Simon Rattle works at the Berlin Philharmonic, how Mariss Jansons deals with the Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam, and how Claudio Abbado creates the world's most luxurious pick-up band every year with the Lucerne Festival Orchestra. From London to Budapest, Bamberg to Vienna, great orchestral concerts are recreated as a collection of countless human and musical stories.

Classical Seattle

Maestros, Impresarios, Virtuosi, and Other Music Makers

Author: Melinda Bargreen

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 368

View: 719

The past 50 years have seen a tremendous arts boom in Seattle, which has given the city not only internationally recognized classical music institutions but also great performance halls to showcase their work and that of visiting artists. From Igor Stravinsky’s presence as guest conductor at the World’s Fair in 1962, to Speight Jenkins’s masterly production of Wagner’s Ring cycle, to the work of benefactors such as Jack and Becky Benaroya, Seattle is deservingly well known as a city of the musical arts. In Classical Seattle, Melinda Bargreen documents the lives of prominent figures in the local classical music world. Informed by Bargreen’s experience as a music critic and drawing on interviews she conducted over several decades, the 35 biographical profiles presented here illuminate the conductors, performing artists, composers, arts organizers, and arts leaders who have shaped Seattle’s classical music community and made world-class performances possible. Among the individuals featured are University of Washington virtuosi, Seattle Symphony maestros and musicians, and Seattle Opera directors.

Music and Maestros

The Story of the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra

Author: John K. Sherman

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 372

View: 125

Music and Maestros was first published in 1952. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. Music lovers all over the United States as well as in other countries have heard the music of the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra under the direction of such noted conductors as Dimitri Mitropoulos and Eugene Ormandy. Now they can enjoy the story behind those concerts, records, and radio broadcasts through this intimate history of the men and music that have made the orchestra famous. The story begins with the lively musical activities of a frontier town, the antecedents of the symphony orchestra that took shape at the turn of the century. From the early years of the organization under the batons of Emil Oberhoffer and Henri Verbrugghen, the chronicle rises to the period of the great contemporaries, Ormandy, Mitropoulos, and Antal Dorati. There is a wealth of detail on the career of Mitropoulos, the renowned New York Philharmonic conductor who reached his present stature during his leadership of the Minneapolis orchestra.The extensive concert tours that have earned for the Minneapolis symphony the nickname of "orchestra on wheels" are recalled in anecdotes that will evoke many a chuckle and plenty of amazement. Accounts of early recording sessions offer fascinating sidelights on this aspect of musical history. A complete list of the works performed by the orchestra during the past fifty years provides a significant record of changing trends in musical tastes. A roster of al the players who have been members of the orchestra is given, and the reference section also includes a complete list of out-of-town engagements and a list of the orchestra's recordings which are available.

Music, Madness, and the Unworking of Language

Author: John T Hamilton

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 272

View: 948

In the romantic tradition, music is consistently associated with madness, either as cause or cure. Writers as diverse as Kleist, Hoffmann, and Nietzsche articulated this theme, which in fact reaches back to classical antiquity and continues to resonate in the modern imagination. What John Hamilton investigates in this study is the way literary, philosophical, and psychological treatments of music and madness challenge the limits of representation and thereby create a crisis of language. Special focus is given to the decidedly autobiographical impulse of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, where musical experience and mental disturbance disrupt the expression of referential thought, illuminating the irreducible aspects of the self before language can work them back into a discursive system. The study begins in the 1750s with Diderot's Neveu de Rameau, and situates that text in relation to Rousseau's reflections on the voice and the burgeoning discipline of musical aesthetics. Upon tracing the linkage of music and madness that courses through the work of Herder, Hegel, Wackenroder, and Kleist, Hamilton turns his attention to E. T. A. Hoffmann, whose writings of the first decades of the nineteenth century accumulate and qualify the preceding tradition. Throughout, Hamilton considers the particular representations that link music and madness, investigating the underlying motives, preconceptions, and ideological premises that facilitate the association of these two experiences. The gap between sensation and its verbal representation proved especially problematic for romantic writers concerned with the ineffability of selfhood. The author who chose to represent himself necessarily faced problems of language, which invariably compromised the uniqueness that the author wished to express. Music and madness, therefore, unworked the generalizing functions of language and marked a critical limit to linguistic capabilities. While the various conflicts among music, madness, and language questioned the viability of signification, they also raised the possibility of producing meaning beyond significance.

Sounding Indigenous

Authenticity in Bolivian Music Performance

Author: M. Bigenho

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 289

View: 842

Sounding Indigenous explores the relations between music, people, and places through analysis of Bolivian music performances: by a non-governmental organization involved in musical activities, by a music performing ensemble, and by the people living in two rural areas of Potosi. Based on research conducted between 1993 and 1995, the book frames debates of Bolivian national and indigenous identities in terms of different attitudes people assume towards cultural and artistic authenticity. The book makes unique contributions through an emphasis on music as sensory experience, through its theorization of authenticity in relation to music, through its combined focus on different kinds of Bolivian music (indigenous, popular, avant-garde), through its combined focus on music performance and the Bolivian nation, and through its interpretation of local, national, and transnational fieldwork experiences.

Maestros in America

Conductors in the 21st Century

Author: Roderick L. Sharpe

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 384

View: 194

This volume presents biographical and critical essays of the leading orchestral conductors of US nationality, or of non-US citizens holding permanent appointments in the US, during the twenty-first century.

Mahayk and the Barber of Lyle

Book I the Night Tokyo Burned

Author: Norman S. deLisle

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 183

View: 441

Synopsis MAHAYK AND THE BARBER OF LYLE This literary novel is about a twelve-year-old Japanese violinist, who has lost everything when 360 B-29 bombers have burned Tokyo in 1945, becomes a Gamigaze pilot. During his mission, US Task Force 78 shot him down in Korea Strait. General Ma Halbin who survived Tragic Long March of the Red Army and fought the Japanese all his life until being fatally wounded and disabled by the Japanese attacks in Yenan, saves this enemy boy. The boy fights Korean War; becomes a commander; and exiles to America accused of plotting a coup detat.

Music and Culture in Eighteenth-Century Europe

A Source Book

Author: Enrico Fubini

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 421

View: 568

This book collects key writings about eighteenth century music . It brings together for the first time in one place, a wide selection of essential documents not only about music theory and practice, but about the historical, philosophical, aesthetic, ideological, and literary debates which held sway during a century when musical thought and criticism gained a privileged position in the culture of Europe. Enrico Fubini offers a sampling of English, French, German, and Italian writings on topics ranging from Enlightenment rationalism and the theories of harmony to German musical culture and the polemics on J. S. Bach. Organized by topic and historical period these selections go beyond writings dealing exclusively with specific musical works to larger issues of theory and the reception of musical ideas in the culture at large. The selections are from books, journals, newspapers, pamphlets, and letters; the contributors include Diderot, Rousseau, Voltaire, Grimm, Alfieri, Rameau, Quantz, Gluck, Tartini, Leopold and W. A. Mozart, and C. P .E. Bach. Many are translated here for the first time. With general and chapter introductions, restored footnotes, and other valuable annotations, and a biographical appendix, this anthology will interest music scholars, students, and teachers.