Spiritualism, Madame Blavatsky & Theosophy

An Eyewitness View of Occult History : Lectures

Author: Rudolf Steiner

Publisher: SteinerBooks

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 302

View: 826

Selections from the Works of Rudolf Steiner Without the spiritualist movement and the amazing personality of Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, the creator of the Theosophical Society, the spiritual revolution of the twentieth century--the so-called New Age, with all its movers and shakers--would be unimaginable. And the work of Rudolf Steiner, G.I. Gurdjieff, René Guénon, Hazrat Inayat Khan, Sri Aurobindo, R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz, and C.G. Jung could not have become what it was. In this fascinating volume on the Theosophical movement, Rudolf Steiner, one of its primary participants, tells his story in his own words. We are told of the origins of the theosophical movement in spiritualism and somnambulism. We are given Steiner's own version of the relationship between Anthroposophy and Theosophy through his White Lotus Day Lectures, given over several years on the anniversary of Madame Blavatsky's death. Steiner then moves into the realm of occult history, where he relates Theosophy to its historical ground in Western esotericism, especially Rosicrucianism. He reveals events from the seventeenth century that led to the emergence of Freemasonry and other secret societies, as well as the hidden history of the creation of Theosophy in the nineteenth century and the conflicts that still reverberate today between the Anglo-Saxon and Germanic occult streams. CONTENTS Introduction by Christopher Bamford Prologue: A Personal Statement (from "The Barr Document") PART ONE: Spiritualism, Somnambulism, and Theosophy 1. Theosophy and Spiritualism 2. Theosophy and Somnambulism 3. The History of Spiritualism 4. The History of Hypnotism PART TWO: White Lotus Day Lectures in Honor of the Anniversary of the Death of Madame Blavatsky 5. The Return of the Mysteries 6. Remembering Madame Blavatsky 7. Christ and the Further Development of Consciousness 8. Ancient Wisdom and the Heralding of the Christ Impulse PART THREE: Hidden Aspects of Occult History 9. Materialism and Occultism 10. The Founding of the Theosophical Society 11. The Significance of the Eighth Sphere 12. More on the Eight Sphere 13. Some Background to the Role of Madame Blavatsky 14. Occult Brotherhoods 15. Madame Blavatsky's Occult Imprisonment PART FOUR: From Theosophy to Anthroposophy 16. Homeless Souls 17. The Unveiling of Spiritual Truths 18. The Opposition to Spiritual Revelations 19. Spiritual Truths and the Physical World 20. The Decline of the Theosophical Society 21. The Emergence of the Anthroposophical Movement

Madame Blavatsky

The Mother of Modern Spirituality

Author: Gary Lachman

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 352

View: 133

A thoughtful biography of one of the most polarizing pioneers of alternative spirituality, the occult-mystic Helena Petrovna Blavatsky. Pioneer. Visionary. Provocateur. Madame Helena Petrovna Blavatsky—mystic, occult writer, child of Russian aristocrats, spiritual seeker who traveled five continents, and founder (with Henry Steel Olcott) of the Theosophical Society—is still being hailed as an icon and scorned as a fraud more than 120 years after her death. But despite perennial interest in her life, writings, and philosophy, no single biography has examined the controversy and legacy of this influential thinker who helped define modern alternative spirituality—until now. Gary Lachman, the acclaimed spiritual biographer behind volumes such as Rudolf Steiner and Jung the Mystic, brings us an in-depth look at Blavatsky, objectively exploring her unique and singular contributions toward introducing Eastern and esoteric spiritual ideas to the West during the nineteenth century, as well as the controversies that continue to color the discussions of her life and work.

Madame Blavatsky

The Woman Behind the Myth

Author: Marion Meade

Publisher: Open Road Media

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 660

View: 378

The life and times of Helena Blavatsky, the controversial religious guru who cofounded the Theosophical Society and kick-started the New Age movement. Recklessly brilliant, Helena Petrovna Blavatsky scandalized her 19th century world with a controversial new religion that tried to synthesize Eastern and Western philosophies. If her contemporaries saw her as a freak, a charlatan, and a snake oil salesman, she viewed herself as a special person born for great things. She firmly believed that it was her destiny to enlighten the world. Rebelliously breaking conventions, she was the antithesis of a pious religious leader. She cursed, smoked, overate, and needed to airbrush out certain inconvenient facts, like husbands, lovers, and a child. Marion Meade digs deep into Madame Blavatsky’s life from her birth in Russia among the aristocracy to a penniless exile in Europe, across the Atlantic to New York where she became the first Russian woman naturalized as an American citizen, and finally moving on to India where she established the international headquarters of the Theosophical Society in 1882. As she chased from continent to continent, she left in her aftermath a trail of enthralled followers and the ideas of Theosophy that endure to this day. While dismissed as a female messiah, her efforts laid the groundwork for the New Age movement, which sought to reconcile Eastern traditions with Western occultism. Her teachings entered the mainstream by creating new respect for the cultures and religions of the East—for Buddhism and Hinduism—and interest in meditation, yoga, gurus, and reincarnation. Madame Blavatsky was one of a kind. Here is her richly bizarre story told with compassion, insight, and an attempt to plumb the truth behind those astonishing accomplishments.

Madame Blavatsky Revisited

Author: Joseph Howard Tyson

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 192

"If this work is of men it will come to nothing: but if it is of God, you cannot overthrow it " -Rabbi Gamaliel, Acts 5:38?39 Was Theosophical Society founder Helena P. Blavatsky a prophetess or charlatan? Since the 1870's detractors have lambasted both her character and ideas. Yet, H.P.B.'s reputation has continued to grow. Theosophy's non-dogmatic and ecumenical approach to spirituality offers 21st Century seekers a viable alternative to religious fundamentalism. Today thousands of people on every continent belong to the Theosophical Society. All of Madame's books and articles remain in print. The freshness and wit of her letters make them seem as if they were written yesterday. Though controversial, she's withstood time's test. Madame Blavatsky Revisited tells H.P.B.'s remarkable story in an entertaining manner.

Madame Blavatsky refutes arguments against Theosophy

Author: Helena Petrovna Blavatsky

Publisher: Philaletheians UK

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 14

View: 147

The arguments against Theosophy are like a verdant moss, which displays a velvety carpet of green, without roots, and with a deep bog below. Abuse, pure and simple, is the only weapon of partisans. When a man has lived in crime, his astral cadaver which holds him prisoner, seeks again the objects of his passions and desires to resume its earthly life. It torments the dreams of young girls, bathes in the vapour of spilt blood, and wallows about the places where the pleasures of his life flitted by. The term elementary applies not only to one principle or constituent part, i.e., an elementary primary substance, but also embodies the idea which we express by the term elemental — that which pertains to the four elements of the material world. Elementaries are earth-bound incarnated thoughts of evil men who have passed away. In the grain of sand, as in each atom of the human body, spirit is latent, not active. Yet, the atom is vitalized and energized by spirit, without being endowed with distinct consciousness. Spirit and matter co-existent, inseparable, interdependent, and convertible to each other. But European tongues are too materialistic to make room for such metaphysical ideas. A copious vocabulary, indeed, that has but one term for God and for alcohol! In Sanskrit, for instance, there are twenty words or more to render one idea in its various shades of meaning. Christendom, with its boasted civilization, has outgrown the fetishism of the Fijians. The anthropomorphic ideas of Spiritualists concerning spirit are a direct consequence of the anthropomorphic conceptions of Christians as to their Deity. Spirit is abstract light, uncreated, latent in every atom, in whose profound and sacred repose all motion must cease for ever. Spirit is a ray, a fraction of the Whole; and the Whole being Omniscient and Infinite, its fraction must partake, in degree, of the same abstract attributes. The critics of Theosophy refuse to comprehend the philosophical doctrine that every atom is imbued with Divine Light. It is only when this atom, magnetically drawn to its fellow atoms, that is transformed at last, after endless cycles of evolution, into Man — the crown of intellectual and physical evolution on earth.

Blavatsky refutes the assertions of a French Theosophist

Author: Helena Petrovna Blavatsky

Publisher: Philaletheians UK

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 35

View: 733

These study notes are about a Fellow of the Theosophical Society in Paris, who asserted that Theosophy is a doctrine without proof, without authority, and without prestige in its origin; who accused Brother Theosophists of teaching pseudo-Theosophy and preaching annihilation of the spiritual ego; who talked about the yugas like a blind man about colours; who invented apocryphal Codes in order to discredit Oriental Theosophy; who was not aware of the relation between the sacred sound and the ether of space, or that the Yajur-Veda is “black” when recited by whose accent is impure.

Madame Blavatsky against Spiritualism

Author: Helena Petrovna Blavatsky

Publisher: Philaletheians UK

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 79

View: 479

There are Spirits and Spirits; High Planetary Spirits who have been human beings millions of ages since, and upon other besides our own planet; there are the illusionary appearances of these, projected upon the intra-psychic screen of our mediumistic, hence confused, perceptions; and there are seers and mediums, as there are great men of science, willing and sincere, but ignorant tyros. Spiritualism has spawned almost as many books as a herring does eggs. There can be no spiritual intercourse, either with the souls of the living or the dead, unless it is preceded by self-spiritualization, the conquest of selfishness, and the unfoldment of the nobler powers within us. Spiritualism and Theosophy are mere opinions and beliefs, and nothing more. They can no more claim to be regarded as “facts” than any other emotional belief, for the facts of one will be delusion in the eyes of the other. Spiritualists and Theosophists fully agree that there are higher and pure spirits outside the realm of our physical senses. But they entirely disagree as to the nature and causal agency of “communicating intelligences.” The “disembodied spirits,” instead of having become the wiser for being rid of the physiological impediments and the restraints of their gross material senses, would seem to have become far more stupid, far less perspicacious and, in every respect, worse than they were during their earthly life. As nations became restricted by their own tongue, the once-universal Mystery Language is being gradually denied to subsequent generations. While the disciples of Eastern Occultism are trying to purify matter, Western Spiritualists are striving to degrade spirit. Spiritualists and Theosophists travel along a parallel, if not quite identical, path. Yet, to those bereft of a metaphysico-spiritual vocabulary, Eastern Occultism will remain impassable to the babel tower of modern thought, caused by ignorance of the true meaning of words and their synonyms, a skin deep learning leading to mistaken notions, and the tendency of elevating misconceptions to the dignity of dogmas. If people would stop speculating, and would simply stick to substantiated fact, truth would be more readily attained in each and every case. Truth stands higher than any earthly consideration ever will. Let each of us show our facts and give our explanations; and let those who are neither Occultists, Spiritualists, nor sceptics, adjudicate between the contestant parties. The world must learn at last, under the penalty of falling back to superstitious beliefs in the biblical devil, why such phenomena do so happen, and to what cause or causes they are to be attributed. New Dispensation is the latest folly of dogmatic Christianity. We are not acquainted with a god who thinks, plots, rewards, punishes, and repents. The only god whom we serve is humanity, and our only cult is love of our fellow man. This our religion and dogma. Men have done their best to replace the solar rays with the false glare of error and fiction; none more so than the bigoted, narrow-minded theologians and priests of every faith, the sophists and perverters of the Spirit of Truth. Parsifal is the theatrical representation of good and evil in a supreme struggle. It is our universe, saved through atonement; it is sin redeemed through grace, and the triumph of faith and charity. Thus far, Pilate’s “What is truth?” has never been sufficiently answered to the satisfaction of narrow-minded sectarians. The Theosophical Society upholds and advocates only corroborated facts and Truth, and nothing but the Truth, whencesoever and from whomsoever it may come. Our views have to stand or fall upon their own merit, since we claim neither divine revelation nor infallibility. We will not serve Truth and Falsehood at the same time. Our policy is war to death to every unproved dogma, superstition, bigotry, and intolerance.