Macmillan’s Magazine, 1859–1907

No Flippancy or Abuse Allowed

Author: George J. Worth

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 586

Macmillan's Magazine has long been recognized as one of the most significant of the many British literary/intellectual periodicals that flourished in the second half of the nineteenth century. Yet the first volume of the Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals (1966) pointed out that 'There is no study of Macmillan's Magazine' - and that lack has been only partially remedied in all the decades since. In this work, George Worth addresses five principal questions. Where did Macmillan's come from, and why in 1859? Who or what was the guiding spirit behind the Magazine, especially in its early, formative years? What cluster of ideas gave it such coherence as it manifested during that period? How did it and its parent firm deal with authors and juggle their periodical work and the books they produced for Macmillan and Co.? And what, finally, accounted for the palpable decline in the quality and fiscal health of Macmillan's during the last 25 years of its life and, ultimately, for its death? Worth includes a treasure trove of original material about the Magazine much of it drawn from unpublished manuscripts and other previously untapped primary sources. Macmillan's Magazine, 1859-1907 contributes to the understanding not only of one significant Victorian periodical but also, more generally, of the literary and cultural milieu in which it originated, flourished, declined, and expired.

Macmillan: A Publishing Tradition, 1843-1970

Author: E. James

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 273

View: 749

For over one hundred and fifty years, since its founding in 1843, Macmillan has been at the heart of British publishing. This collection of essays, representing recent research in the archives at the British library, examines the firms' astute business strategy during the nineteenth century, its successful expansion into overseas markets in America and India, its complex and intriguing relations with authors such as Matthew Arnold, Thomas Hardy, Alfred Lord Tennyson, W.B.Yeats, and J.M.Keynes, with additional chapters on Macmillan Magazine and the work of a modern children's editor.

MacMillan's Magazine -

Author: Macmillan's Magazine

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 552

View: 608

Macmillan's Magazine - Vol. XXXVI by Macmillan's Magazine. This book is a reproduction of the original book published in 1877 and may have some imperfections such as marks or hand-written notes.

The Correspondence of Henry James and the House of Macmillan, 1877–1914

‘All the Links in the Chain’

Author: Rayburn S. Moore

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 256

View: 320

This is the first book to collect nearly all of the extant correspondence between Henry James and Macmillan in London and, to a lesser degree, in New York. The letters, chiefly between James and Frederick Macmillan over a period of thirty-seven years, deal primarily with business matters, but they also include comment on literary and social affairs. The editorial apparatus seeks to provide context and information sufficient to make the letters available to an academic as well as a general audience.

MacMillan's Magazine, 1896 (Classic Reprint)

Author: John Morley

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 524

View: 152

Excerpt from Macmillan's Magazine, 1896 Officers cry loudly for reform in the Military Magazines, but in vain when suddenly the peace of forty years breaks up, and we are face to face with the Crimean War. Our regiment is ordered to embark on foreign service, but, being through no fault of its own unprepared, is obliged to leave two of its six troops behind to form a depot, and, finally sails, even after reinforcement by the usual drafts, with the miserable strength of two hundred and fifty men. Before it reaches the Crimean peninsula these numbers have been reduced by sickness to less than two hundred, and it goes into action at Balaklava, even so not the weakest regiment of its brigade, with less than one hundred and fifty men in the ranks. Having been practically anni hilated in the battle, its establishment is raised to eight troops, and it comes home four hundred strong. There upon it is at once reduced to six troops, and the process Of diminution is in full swing, when it receives orders to prepare for service against the mutineers in India. Up goes the establishment again to ten troops no less than five regiments are drained to bring it up to strength; and thus reinforced by a hundred and thirty-two men, strangers to their officers and to each other, the regi ment sails for Bombay four hundred and fifty strong. There for the pres ent let us leave it. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

MacMillan's Magazine

Author: Anonymous

Publisher: Arkose Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 560

View: 679

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Hereditary Character and Talent: As Found Originally in Macmillan's Magazine in 1865

Author: Francis Galton

Publisher: Suzeteo Enterprises

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 56

View: 588

A half-cousin of Charles Darwin, Francis Galton argued that if physical attributes could be subjected to Darwinian principles of selection, 'mental qualities' could be as well. This edition is based on Galton's influential essay published in MacMillan's Magazine, in 1865.

MacMillan's Magazine, 1874, Vol. 30 (Classic Reprint)

Author: David Masson

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 580

View: 716

Excerpt from Macmillan's Magazine, 1874, Vol. 30 It was during the period in which Fielding was most busily employed upon his literary ventures that he married a second time (having lost a few years before the lady to whom it has been seen he was devotedly attached), and we now find him bending to his work with redoubled energy. But all his as siduity was in vain, and he was com pelled to announce with regret that he could no longer continue the publication of The Covent Garden Journal - a paper he was then editing. The mental and physical strain had been too severe, and there were now added to his other ailments the alarming symptoms of dropsy. The only hope held out by his physician for the prolongation of his life was that he Should go abroad; and this, upon the earnest solicitations Of his friends, Fielding consented to do. Portugal having been recommended, he tore himself from his wife and children, and set sail for Lisbon on the 26th of June, 1754. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.