Deco LAndmarks

Art Deco Gems of Los Angeles

Author: Arnold Schwartzman

Publisher: Princeton Architectural Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 155

View: 217

Three hundred full-color photographs celebrate the finest examples of Art Deco style in Los Angeles, examining dozens of monuments and structures from across the L.A. Basin that exemplify the streamlined design aesthetic that marked the 1920s and 1930s. Original. 12,500 first printing.

Los Angeles Art Deco

Author: Suzanne Tarbell Cooper

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 125

Art Deco made its formal appearance in Paris at the 1925 L'Exposition Internationale des Arts Dâecoratifs et Industriels Modernes, a showcase for art, architecture, and design that promoted progress, modernity, and the present. The greatest export from this exhibition was a style that has since been recognized as one of the great design movements of the 20th century. Art Deco's growing recognition coincided with the growth of Los Angeles as the entertainment capital. Between the world wars, the city's architecture sprouted characteristic signs of Art Deco: the interplay of vertical and horizontal features, geometric shapes, use of exotic and modern materials, as well as simplified streamlined forms. This volume's collection of images celebrates Los Angeles's Art Deco heritage, showcasing such structures as Bullock's Wilshire, Sunset Tower, the Oviatt Penthouse, the Wiltern and Pantages Theatres, and many more.--From publisher description.

Long Beach Art Deco

Author: John W. Thomas

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 127

View: 175

At 5:55 p.m. on March 10, 1933, Southern California was rocked by a massive earthquake. Wood-frame bungalows lost their chimneys, and engineered concrete buildings suffered minimal damage. But unreinforced masonry buildings near the epicenter failed catastrophically, and Long Beach was particularly hard hit. Nearly three-quarters of the school buildings, as well as many other structures, were rendered unusable until repaired or rebuilt. The Art Deco style, in addition to being fashionably modern in 1933, met the criteria of earthquake safety, and many new structures showed its influence. Both the Zigzag Moderne style of the 1920s, which boasted many structures that survived the earthquake, and the Streamline Moderne style that came into vogue in the 1930s relied on sleek lines with decoration incorporated into the design. This volume celebrates, in both word and image, the Long Beach that rose from the rubble to become a premier Art Deco city. At 5:55 p.m. on March 10, 1933, Southern California was rocked by a massive earthquake. Wood-frame bungalows lost their chimneys, and engineered concrete buildings suffered minimal damage. But unreinforced masonry buildings near the epicenter failed catastrophically, and Long Beach was particularly hard hit. Nearly three-quarters of the school buildings, as well as many other structures, were rendered unusable until repaired or rebuilt. The Art Deco style, in addition to being fashionably modern in 1933, met the criteria of earthquake safety, and many new structures showed its influence. Both the Zigzag Moderne style of the 1920s, which boasted many structures that survived the earthquake, and the Streamline Moderne style that came into vogue in the 1930s relied on sleek lines with decoration incorporated into the design. This volume celebrates, in both word and image, the Long Beach that rose from the rubble to become a premier Art Deco city.

Art Deco

A Mode of Mobility

Author: Michael Windover

Publisher: Puq

ISBN:

Category: ART

Page: 289

View: 741

Theatres in Los Angeles

Author: Suzanne Tarbell Cooper

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 969

Los Angeles and the movies grew up together, and a natural extension of the picture business was the premium presentation of the product--the biggest, best, and brightest theatres imaginable. The magnificent movie palaces along Broadway in downtown Los Angeles still represent the highest concentration of vintage theatres in the world. With Hollywood and the movies practically synonymous, the theatres in the studios' neighborhood were state-of-the-art for showbiz, whether they were designed for film, vaudeville, or stage productions. From the elegant Orpheum and the exotic Grauman's Chinese to the modest El Rey, this volume celebrates the architecture and social history of Los Angeles's unique collection of historic theatres past and present. The common threads that connect them all, from the grandest movie palace to the smallest neighborhood theatre, are stories and the ghosts of audiences past waiting in the dark for the show to begin.

Art Deco

The Twentieth Century's Iconic Decorative Style from Paris, London, and Brussels to New York, Sydney, and Santa Monica

Author: Arnold Schwartzman

Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 224

View: 506

Arnold Schwartzman's stunning photographs of the finest examples of Art Deco from all over the world are collected here as a celebration of one of the world's most popular decorative styles. Art deco is the 20th century's most glamorous architectural style, and the one that shaped popular ideas of modern luxury. With over 200 photographs, this is a visual celebration of this very popular style. Unlike most other books on the subject that tend to be regionally specific, this book highlights Art Deco buildings from all over the world, from Australia to South America, with an emphasis on London, Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, Miami, and Paris. Art Deco features much careful and exacting detail, and of special interest in this book are photos that zoom in on murals, mosaics, flooring, ironwork, and other ornamental flourishes. Art Deco began in 1925 and quickly swept the globe becoming the style epitomizing Jazz Age glamor and sophistication. It drew from a variety of influences including ancient Egyptian, Moorish, and Mayan motifs but also modernist movements like Cubism, Fauvism, and De Stijl. Its influence was felt everywhere, from the skylines of New York to Shanghai, and it gained prominence not only with architects and designers but enjoyed a passionate following among the public as well.

New York, Chicago, Los Angeles

America's Global Cities

Author: Janet L. Abu-Lughod

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 580

View: 485

New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles -- for all their differences, they are quintessentially American cities. They are also among the handful of cities on the earth that can be called "global". Janet L. Abu-Lughod's book is the first to compare them in an ambitious in-depth study that takes into account each city's unique history, following their development from their earliest days to their current status as players on the global stage.

The Dream Endures

California Enters the 1940s

Author: Kevin Starr

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 508

What we now call "the good life" first appeared in California during the 1930s. Motels, home trailers, drive-ins, barbecues, beach life and surfing, sports from polo and tennis and golf to mountain climbing and skiing, "sportswear" (a word coined at the time), and sun suits were all a part of the good life--perhaps California's most distinctive influence of the 1930s. In The Dream Endures, Kevin Starr shows how the good life prospered in California--in pursuits such as film, fiction, leisure, and architecture--and helped to define American culture and society then and for years to come. Starr previously chronicled how Californians absorbed the thousand natural shocks of the Great Depression--unemployment, strikes, Communist agitation, reactionary conspiracies--in Endangered Dreams, the fourth volume of his classic history of California. In The Dream Endures, Starr reveals the other side of the picture, examining the newly important places where the good life flourished, like Los Angeles (where Hollywood lived), Palm Springs (where Hollywood vacationed), San Diego (where the Navy went), the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena (where Einstein went and changed his view of the universe), and college towns like Berkeley. We read about the rich urban life of San Francisco and Los Angeles, and in newly important communities like Carmel and San Simeon, the home of William Randolph Hearst, where, each Thursday afternoon, automobiles packed with Hollywood celebrities would arrive from Southern California for the long weekend at Hearst Castle. The 1930s were the heyday of the Hollywood studios, and Starr brilliantly captures Hollywood films and the society that surrounded the studios. Starr offers an astute discussion of the European refugees who arrived in Hollywood during the period: prominent European film actors and artists and the creative refugees who were drawn to Hollywood and Southern California in these years--Igor Stravinsky, Arnold Schoenberg, Man Ray, Bertolt Brecht, Christopher Isherwood, Aldous Huxley, Thomas Mann, and Franz Werfel. Starr gives a fascinating account of how many of them attempted to recreate their European world in California and how others, like Samuel Goldwyn, provided stories and dreams for their adopted nation. Starr reserves his greatest attention and most memorable writing for San Francisco. For Starr, despite the city's beauty and commercial importance, San Francisco's most important achievement was the sense of well-being it conferred on its citizens. It was a city that "magically belonged to everyone." Whether discussing photographers like Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, "hard-boiled fiction" writers, or the new breed of female star--Marlene Dietrich, Jean Harlow, Bette Davis, Carole Lombard, and the improbable Mae West--The Dream Endures is a brilliant social and cultural history--in many ways the most far-reaching and important of Starr's California books.

Art deco

Los Angeles : photographs

Author: Ave Pildas

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 64

View: 596

The Historic Core of Los Angeles

Author: Curtis C. Roseman

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Photography

Page: 128

View: 545

In the early 20th century, there was no better example of a classic American downtown than Los Angeles. Since World War II, Los Angeles's Historic Core has been "passively preserved," with most of its historic buildings left intact. Recent renovations of the area for residential use and the construction of Disney Hall and the Staples Center are shining a new spotlight on its many pre-1930s Beaux Arts, Art Deco, and Spanish Baroque buildings.