Loco in Yokohama

Author: Baye McNeil

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ISBN:

Category: African American men

Page: 344

View: 942

Knife-wielding school girls, scrotum-seeking school boys, back-stabbing bimbos...and some of the finest human beings this side of the globe! Yokohama has it all and Loco has lived it and is telling the tale, no holds-barred! Loco in Yokohama is your front row seat to peer through a secret window into the hilarity and the hell that is living, loving and teaching in Japan. If you're looking for a raw, undiluted, unequivocal account of life in the land of the rising sun, you're looking for Loco!

Loco

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Locomotives

Page:

View: 992

Hi! My Name Is Loco and I Am a Racist

Author: Baye McNeil

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: African American men

Page: 392

View: 835

Born to Love - Taught to Loathe In this powerful and controversial debut book, acclaimed blogger turned author, Baye McNeil (a.k.a. Loco), vividly illustrates with unflinching introspection and candor the birth and evolution of a racist and in doing so makes the persuasive argument that the only way to cure this social virus is by first engaging one's own susceptibility. Loco takes us on a scintillating journey from the streets of Brooklyn, where a child's first playground was the front lines of the Pan-African Nationalist and Black Power movements of the 70s, to a period of black militancy, military service, interracial romance and corporate bigotry in the 80s and 90s. Following the earth-shattering events of 9/11/2001, Loco journeys to Japan where he learns the hard way why the old adage: you can't hide from yourself, has hung around so long. He finds the woman he was born to love; only she's a member of a race he has come to loathe! In the name of this love, Loco confronts his dark stowaway with deep roots even as the world is literally falling apart around him, in the form of the Tohoku disaster of 3/11/2011. A book that is both a memoir and an impassioned call to arms, Hi! My Name is Loco and I am a Racist tells us in no uncertain terms that while racism continues to be demonized as a dark aberration that only "evil people," ignorant fools, or people lacking compassion and common decency are subject to, then it will remain at large - hiding in plain sight, in our schools, offices, carpools, living rooms and sometimes even in the mirror.