Living a Feminist Life

Author: Sara Ahmed

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 508

In Living a Feminist Life Sara Ahmed shows how feminist theory is generated from everyday life and the ordinary experiences of being a feminist at home and at work. Building on legacies of feminist of color scholarship in particular, Ahmed offers a poetic and personal meditation on how feminists become estranged from worlds they critique—often by naming and calling attention to problems—and how feminists learn about worlds from their efforts to transform them. Ahmed also provides her most sustained commentary on the figure of the feminist killjoy introduced in her earlier work while showing how feminists create inventive solutions—such as forming support systems—to survive the shattering experiences of facing the walls of racism and sexism. The killjoy survival kit and killjoy manifesto, with which the book concludes, supply practical tools for how to live a feminist life, thereby strengthening the ties between the inventive creation of feminist theory and living a life that sustains it.

Creating Resistances: Pastoral Care in a Postcolonial World

Author: Melinda McGarrah Sharp

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 236

View: 451

In Creating Resistances: Pastoral Care in a Postcolonial World, Melinda McGarrah Sharp studies the concept of resistance to outline what postcolonial pastoral care can look like in practice, particularly for people who feel more removed from the urgency of today’s postcolonial realities.

What's the Use?

On the Uses of Use

Author: Sara Ahmed

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 295

Continuing the work she began in The Promise of Happiness and Willful Subjects by taking up a single word and following its historical, intellectual, and political significance, Sara Ahmed explores how use operates as an organizing concept, technology of control, and tool for diversity work.

Researching Gender, Violence and Abuse

Theory, Methods, Action

Author: Nicole Westmarland

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 279

Feminist research on gender, violence and abuse has been an area of academic study since the late 1970s, and has increased exponentially over this time on a global scale. Although situated in a predominantly qualitative tradition, research in the field has developed to include quantitative and mixed methodologies. This book offers a compendium of research methods on gender and violence, from the traditional to the innovative, and showcases best practice in feminist research and international case studies. Researching Gender, Violence and Abuse covers: The origins of feminist research, Ethical considerations relating to research on gender, violence and abuse, Working in partnership with organisations such as the police or the voluntary sector, A comprehensive range of research methods including interviews and focus groups, surveys, arts-based research and ethnography, The challenges and opportunities of working with existing data, The influence of activism on research and the translation of research into policy and practice. This book is perfect reading for students taking courses on violence against women, domestic violence, gender and crime, as well as advanced students embarking on new research.

Interrogating Postfeminism

Gender and the Politics of Popular Culture

Author: Yvonne Tasker

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 344

View: 528

DIVFeminist essays examining postfeminism in American and British popular culture./div

Living for the Revolution

Black Feminist Organizations, 1968–1980

Author: Kimberly Springer

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 399

The first in-depth analysis of the black feminist movement, Living for the Revolution fills in a crucial but overlooked chapter in African American, women’s, and social movement history. Through original oral history interviews with key activists and analysis of previously unexamined organizational records, Kimberly Springer traces the emergence, life, and decline of several black feminist organizations: the Third World Women’s Alliance, Black Women Organized for Action, the National Black Feminist Organization, the National Alliance of Black Feminists, and the Combahee River Collective. The first of these to form was founded in 1968; all five were defunct by 1980. Springer demonstrates that these organizations led the way in articulating an activist vision formed by the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality. The organizations that Springer examines were the first to explicitly use feminist theory to further the work of previous black women’s organizations. As she describes, they emerged in response to marginalization in the civil rights and women’s movements, stereotyping in popular culture, and misrepresentation in public policy. Springer compares the organizations’ ideologies, goals, activities, memberships, leadership styles, finances, and communication strategies. Reflecting on the conflicts, lack of resources, and burnout that led to the demise of these groups, she considers the future of black feminist organizing, particularly at the national level. Living for the Revolution is an essential reference: it provides the history of a movement that influenced black feminist theory and civil rights activism for decades to come.

Collected Letters of a Renaissance Feminist

Author: Laura Cereta

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 244

View: 204

Renaissance writer Laura Cereta (1469–1499) presents feminist issues in a predominantly male venue—the humanist autobiography in the form of personal letters. Cereta's works circulated widely in Italy during the early modern era, but her complete letters have never before been published in English. In her public lectures and essays, Cereta explores the history of women's contributions to the intellectual and political life of Europe. She argues against the slavery of women in marriage and for the rights of women to higher education, the same issues that have occupied feminist thinkers of later centuries. Yet these letters also furnish a detailed portrait of an early modern woman’s private experience, for Cereta addressed many letters to a close circle of family and friends, discussing highly personal concerns such as her difficult relationships with her mother and her husband. Taken together, these letters are a testament both to an individual woman and to enduring feminist concerns.

A Feminist Perspective on Virtue Ethics

Author: S. Berges

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 199

View: 730

A Feminist Perspective on Virtue Ethics provides of historical survey of feminist virtue ethics, and shows how the ethical theorizing of women in the past can be brought to bear on that of women in the present.

Human Liberation in a Feminist Perspective--a Theology

Author: Letty M. Russell

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 213

View: 417

A feminist theologian relates the New Testament's message of salvation to contemporary struggles to achieve human equality and freedom.

June Cleaver Was a Feminist!

Reconsidering the Female Characters of Early Television

Author: Cary O’Dell

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 244

View: 857

Long dismissed as ciphers, sycophants and “Stepford Wives,” women characters of primetime television during the 1950s through the 1980s are overdue for this careful reassessment. From smart, savvy wives and resilient mothers (including the much-maligned June Cleaver and Donna Reed) to talented working women (long before the debut of “Mary Tyler Moore”) to crimebusters and even criminals, American women on television emerge as a diverse, empowered, individualistic, and capable lot, highly worthy of emulation and appreciation.