Little Witch Academia, Vol. 1 (manga)

Author: Yoh Yoshinari

Publisher: Yen Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 176

View: 890

"Reach out your hand, and your story will begin!" Those words changed young Atsuko "Akko" Kagari forever, sparking in her a lifelong dream of becoming a real witch. Now she's been accepted to the same school as her childhood hero, Shiny Chariot-the prestigious Luna Nova Witchcraft Academy. As the only student to come from a non-magical family, Akko finds herself surrounded by prodigies from around the world, but giving up isn't in her vocabulary. Whether it's making friends, proving the doubters wrong, or just flying on a broom, Akko is going to make her fantasy a reality!

Little Witch Academia (light novel)

The Nonsensical Witch and the Country of the Fairies

Author: Momo Tachibana

Publisher: JY

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 176

View: 190

An original story based on the hit anime! To fulfill her dream of becoming a witch, Atsuko Kagari has been working hard at Luna Nova Magical Academy. But after a trip to a magical hilltop--rumored to be a popular spot for fairies--dogs and cats start going missing, and it's up to Akko, Lotte, and Sucy to get to the bottom of it!

Little Witch Academia, Vol. 3 (manga)

Author: Yoh Yoshinari

Publisher: JY

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 192

View: 794

"Don't give up, and your feelings will reach!" It's time for the famous inter-school flying broom race, and everyone is betting on Diana to win! But when she falls ill, who's going to take her place? And what will become of Akko and Luna Nova?! The mirthful magical fantasy series concludes!

Graphic Novels: A Guide to Comic Books, Manga, and More, 2nd Edition

Author: Michael Pawuk

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 719

View: 807

Covering genres from action/adventure and fantasy to horror, science fiction, and superheroes, this guide maps the vast and expanding terrain of graphic novels, describing and organizing titles as well as providing information that will help librarians to build and balance their graphic novel collections and direct patrons to read-alikes. • Introduces users to approximately 1,000 currently popular graphic novels and manga • Organizes titles by genre, subgenre, and theme to facilitate finding read-alikes • Helps librarians build and balance their graphic novel collections

The Templars, the Witch, and the Wild Irish

Vengeance and Heresy in Medieval Ireland

Author: Maeve Brigid Callan

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 905

Early medieval Ireland is remembered as the "Land of Saints and Scholars," due to the distinctive devotion to Christian faith and learning that permeated its culture. As early as the seventh century, however, questions were raised about Irish orthodoxy, primarily concerning Easter observances. Yet heresy trials did not occur in Ireland until significantly later, long after allegations of Irish apostasy from Christianity had sanctioned the English invasion of Ireland. In The Templars, the Witch, and the Wild Irish, Maeve Brigid Callan analyzes Ireland’s medieval heresy trials, which all occurred in the volatile fourteenth century. These include the celebrated case of Alice Kyteler and her associates, prosecuted by Richard de Ledrede, bishop of Ossory, in 1324. This trial marks the dawn of the "devil-worshipping witch" in European prosecutions, with Ireland an unexpected birthplace. Callan divides Ireland’s heresy trials into three categories. In the first stand those of the Templars and Philip de Braybrook, whose trial derived from the Templars’, brought by their inquisitor against an old rival. Ledrede’s prosecutions, against Kyteler and other prominent Anglo-Irish colonists, constitute the second category. The trials of native Irishmen who fell victim to the sort of propaganda that justified the twelfth-century invasion and subsequent colonization of Ireland make up the third. Callan contends that Ireland’s trials resulted more from feuds than doctrinal deviance and reveal the range of relations between the English, the Irish, and the Anglo-Irish, and the church’s role in these relations; tensions within ecclesiastical hierarchy and between secular and spiritual authority; Ireland’s position within its broader European context; and political, cultural, ethnic, and gender concerns in the colony.