Literature and the Child

Author: Lee Galda

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 560

View: 734

LITERATURE AND THE CHILD, 9th Edition, offers thorough, concise coverage of the genres and formats of children’s literature and guidance on using literature in the classroom. With a focus on diverse award-winning titles, this market-leading text includes beautifully written and illustrated discussions of exemplary titles for readers in nursery school through middle school. A stunning design features interior illustrations by Lauren Stringer, an award-winning children’s book author and illustrator. Each genre chapter contains criteria for evaluating literary quality, equipping students with a resource to guide text selection in the classroom. Practical, research-based information about teaching appears throughout, including sample teaching ideas and an emphasis on the importance of selecting and teaching complex texts. Extensive booklists provide excellent, ongoing resources and highlight texts that emphasize diversity. This text helps teachers understand how to select books that best serve their curriculum goals as well as the interests and needs of their students. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Literature and the Child

Author: Lee Galda

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 528

View: 105

LITERATURE AND THE CHILD, 8th Edition, covers the two major topical areas of children’s literature: the genres of children’s literature (picturebooks, contemporary realistic fiction, etc.) and the use of children’s literature in the classroom. The book offers succinct yet beautifully written and illustrated discussions that reflect the tone and feel of children’s books. Featuring discussions of the latest works of children’s literature, the book includes coverage of the growing importance of young adult literature as well as emphasis on upper-level children’s literature and adolescent literature. The authors pay careful attention to diversity in children’s literature and equip readers with practical, research-based teaching ideas linked to the Common Core English Language Arts Standards for grades kindergarten through eight. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Literature and the Child

Author: Bernice E. Cullinan

Publisher: Harcourt College Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Children

Page: 577

View: 774

A discussion on how children can read to respond, read to learn, and read to enjoy. This text provides evaluation criteria for selecting superior children's books. Booklists direct readers to quality literature and discussions of selected titles demonstrate the selection criteria. Multicultural literature is discussed throughout the text, with a separate chapter on more specific multicultural issues. The book also features author profiles.

Literature and the Child

Romantic Continuations, Postmodern Contestations

Author: James Holt Mcgavran

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 280

View: 286

The Romantic myth of childhood as a transhistorical holy time of innocence and spirituality, uncorrupted by the adult world, has been subjected in recent years to increasingly serious interrogation. Was there ever really a time when mythic ideals were simple, pure, and uncomplicated? The contributors to this book contend—although in widely differing ways and not always approvingly—that our culture is indeed still pervaded, in this postmodern moment of the very late twentieth century, by the Romantic conception of childhood which first emerged two hundred years ago. In the wake of the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution, western Europe experienced another fin de siècle characterized by overwhelming material and institutional change and instability. By historicizing the specific political, social, and economic conflicts at work within the notion of Romantic childhood, the essayists in Literature and the Child show us how little these forces have changed over time and how enriching and empowering they can still be for children and their parents. In the first section, “Romanticism Continued and Contested,” Alan Richardson and Mitzi Myers question the origins and ends of Romantic childhood. In “Romantic Ironies, Postmodern Texts,” Dieter Petzold, Richard Flynn, and James McGavran argue that postmodern texts for both children and adults perpetuate the Romantic complexities of childhood. Next, in “The Commerce of Children's Books,” Anne Lundin and Paula Connolly study the production and marketing of children's classics. Finally, in “Romantic Ideas in Cultural Confrontations,” William Scheick and Teya Rosenberg investigate interactions of Romantic myths with those of other cultural systems.

The Child Figure in English Literature

Author: Robert Pattison

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 733

Graveyards or wonderlands have more often than firesides and nurseries been the element in which we encounter the child in English literature, and Robert Pattison begins his narrative by asking why literary children are seldom associated with parents and family, but instead repeatedly occur as solitary figures against a background of social and philosophic melancholy. In a skillful fusion of theology, social history, and literature, Pattison isolates and analyzes the repeated conjunction of the literary figure of the child with two fundamental ideas of Western culture--the fall of man and the concept of Original Sin. His study of child figures used in English literature and their antecedents in classical literature and early Christian writing documents the symbiotic development of an idea and an image. Pattison encounters a wide range of literary offspring, among whom are Marvell's little girls, Gray's young Etonians, Blake's children of innocence and experience, the youthful narrators of Dickens and Gosse, the children of George Eliot and Henry James, and the young protagonists in the children's literature of James Janeway, Christina Rossetti, and Lewis Carroll.

Sparing the Child

Grief and the Unspeakable in Youth Literature about Nazism and the Holocaust

Author: Hamida Bosmajian

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 304

View: 209

Bosmajian explores children's texts that have either a Holocaust survivor or a former member of the Hitler Youth as a protagonist.

Chinese Literature and the Child

Children and Childhood in Late-Twentieth-Century Chinese Fiction

Author: K. Foster

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 251

View: 724

Tracking ideas of the child in Chinese society across the twentieth century, Kate Foster places fictional children within the story of the nation in a study of tropes and themes which range from images of strength and purity to the murderous and amoral.

My Mother's Voice

Children, Literature, and the Holocaust

Author: Adrienne Kertzer

Publisher: Broadview Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 201

Named Honor Book of the Year by the Children’s Literature Association Winner: 2003 Canadian Jewish Book Award for scholarship on a Jewish subject Finalist: 2003 Alberta Book Awards Scholarly Book of the Year How do children’s books represent the Holocaust? How do such books negotiate the tension between the desire to protect children, and the commitment to tell children the truth about the world? If Holocaust representations in children’s books respect the narrative conventions of hope and happy endings, how do they differ, if at all, from popular representations intended for adult audiences? And where does innocence lie, if the children’s fable of Roberto Benigni’s Life is Beautiful is marketed for adults, and far more troubling survivor memoirs such as Anita Lobel’s No Pretty Pictures: A Child of War are marketed for children? How should Holocaust Studies integrate discourse about children’s literature into its discussions? In approaching these and other questions, Kertzer uses the lens of children’s literature to problematize the ways in which various adult discourses represent the Holocaust, and continually challenges the conventional belief that children’s literature is the place for easy answers and optimistic lessons.

The Making of the Modern Child

Children's Literature and Childhood in the Late Eighteenth Century

Author: Andrew O'Malley

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 189

View: 811

This book explores how the concept of childhood in the late 18th century was constructed through the ideological work performed by children's literature, as well as pedagogical writing and medical literature of the era. Andrew O'Malley ties the evolution of the idea of "the child" to the growth of the middle class, which used the figure of the child as a symbol in its various calls for social reform.