Literary Knits

30 Patterns Inspired by Favorite Books

Author: Nikol Lohr

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 208

View: 220

More than 30 projects inspired by classic literature Literary Knits features 30 knitting patterns inspired by beloved characters from classic books; from Pride and Prejudice to Moby Dick, The Catcher in the Rye to The Chronicles of Narnia—and many more in between. Inspired by some of the most beloved characters from favorite books, including an elegant Daisy Cloche inspired by The Great Gatsby and a late '50s-inspired Holly Golightly Dress imagined from Breakfast at Tiffany's, the more than 30 knitting projects in this unique collection will inspire knitters and book lovers alike. Each knitting pattern includes precise instruction and robust information on yarn selection and substitution Beautiful photography throughout offers ideas and inspiration for all ages and skill levels, including supporting photos for tricky or less commonly-known techniques Diagrams, assembly instructions, and schematic illustrations ease completion of each project A generous mix of knitting patterns for women, men, and kids If you're a book lover who knits, or a knitter with an appreciation for vintage patterns, Literary Knits is a timeless collection of one-of-a-kind knitting projects.

Knitting America

A Glorious Heritage from Warm Socks to High Art

Author: Susan M. Strawn

Publisher: Voyageur Press (MN)

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 208

View: 724

Enhanced with more than three hundred images, a comprehensive history of knitting in America includes twenty historical knitting patterns.

Texts and Textiles

Affect, Synaesthesia and Metaphor in Fiction

Author: Diana Mary Eva Thomas

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 260

View: 965

This study shows how fiction that makes use of textiles as an essential element utilizes synaesthetic writing and synaesthetic metaphor to create an affective link to, and response in, the reader. These links and responses are examined using affect theory from Silvan Tomkins and Brian Massumi and work on synaesthesia by Richard Cytowic, Lawrence Marks, and V.S. Ramachandran, among others. Synaesthetic writing, including synaesthetic metaphors, has been explored in poetry since the 1920s and, more recently, in fiction, but these studies have been general in nature. By narrowing the field of investigation to those novels that specifically employ three types of hand-crafted textiles (quilt-making, knitting and embroidery), the book isolates how these textiles are used in fiction. The combination of synaesthesia, memory, metaphor and, particularly, synaesthetic metaphor in fiction with textiles in the text of the case studies selected, shows how these are used to create affect in readers, enhancing their engagement in the story. The work is framed within the context of the history of textile production and the use of textiles in fiction internationally, but concentrates on Australian authors who have used textiles in their writing. The decision to focus on Australian authors was taken in light of the quality and depth of the writing of textile fiction produced in Australia between 1980 and 2005 in the three categories of hand-crafted textiles – quilt-making, knitting and embroidery. The texts chosen for intensive study are: Kate Grenville’s The Idea of Perfection (1999, quilting); Marele Day’s Lambs of God (1997, knitting) and Anne Bartlett’s Knitting (2005, knitting); Jessica Anderson’s Tirra Lirra by the River (1978, embroidery) and Marion Halligan’s Spider Cup (1990, embroidery).

White Civility

The Literary Project of English Canada

Author: Daniel Coleman

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 782

In White Civility Daniel Coleman breaks the long silence in Canadian literary and cultural studies around Canadian whiteness and examines its roots as a literary project of early colonials and nation-builders. He argues that a specific form of whiteness emerged in Canada that was heavily influenced by Britishness. Examining four allegorical figures that recur in a wide range of Canadian writings between 1820 and 1950 - the Loyalist fratricide, the enterprising Scottish orphan, the muscular Christian, and the maturing colonial son - Coleman outlines a genealogy of Canadian whiteness that remains powerfully influential in Canadian thinking to this day. Blending traditional literary analysis with the approaches of cultural studies and critical race theory, White Civility examines canonical literary texts, popular journalism, and mass market bestsellers to trace widespread ideas about Canadian citizenship during the optimistic nation-building years as well as during the years of disillusionment that followed the First World War and the Great Depression. Tracing the consistent project of white civility in Canadian letters, Coleman calls for resistance to this project by transforming whiteness into wry civility, unearthing rather than disavowing the history of racism in Canadian literary culture.

DisPossession

Haunting in Canadian Fiction

Author: Marlene Goldman

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 384

View: 671

Much of Canada's contemporary fiction displays an eerie fascination with the supernatural. In DisPossession, Marlene Goldman investigates the links between spectral motifs and the social and historical influences that have shaped Canada. Incorporating both psychoanalytic and non-traditional methods of literary analysis, Goldman explores the ways in which spectral fictions are an expression of definitive Canadian experiences such as the clashes between invading settler and indigenous populations, the losses incurred by immigration and diaspora, and the alienation of the female body. In so doing, Goldman unearths some of the "ghosts" of Canadian society itself - old tensions and injustices that continue to haunt ethnic and gender relations. An important contribution to the discussion of the challenges posed by the Gothic to dominant literary, political, and social narratives, DisPossession asserts that Canadian spectral fictions have the power to alter accepted versions of Canadian history by invoking and troubling the process of generating collective memories.

Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting

Author: Ann Hood

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Crafts & Hobbies

Page: 294

View: 930

This collection of essays from over twenty different authors, including Elizabeth Berg, Ann Patchett, Andre Dubus III and Sue Grafton, describes their passion for knitting, recalling their triumphs and disasters in their craft projects and lives. 30,000 first printing.

The Literary Gazette

A Weekly Journal of Literature, Science, and the Fine Arts

Author: William Jerdan

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 533