Lines in the Sand

Nationalism and Identity on the Peruvian-Chilean Frontier

Author: William E. Skuban

Publisher: UNM Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 671

Following the War of the Pacific (1879-1883), Chile and Peru signed the Treaty of Ancón (1884) that, in part, dealt with settling a territorial dispute over the provinces of Tacna and Arica along the countries' new common border. The treaty allowed Chile to administer the two provinces for a period of ten years, after which a plebiscite would allow the region's inhabitants to determine their own nationality. At the end of the prearranged decade, however, the Chilean and the Peruvian governments had failed to conduct the vote that would determine the fate of the people. Over a quarter of a century later, and after attempts by the U.S. government to mediate the dispute, the two countries in 1929 decided simply to divide the area, with Arica becoming a part of Chile and Peru reincorporating Tacna. Against the backdrop of this contested frontier, William Skuban explores the processes of nationalism and national identity formation in the half century that followed the War of the Pacific. He first considers the national projects of Peru and Chile in the disputed territories and then moves on to how these efforts were received among the diverse social strata of the region. Skuban's study highlights the fabricated nature of national identity in what became one of the most contentious frontier situations in South American history.

A Line in the Sand

Canadians at War in Kandahar

Author: Ray Wiss

Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 393

View: 946

In 2007–08, Dr. Ray Wiss, a former infantry officer, served with the Canadian Forces at forward operating bases in Khandahar's Panjwayi valley, the area experiencing the most intense combat in Afghanistan. He spent more time in the combat area than any other Canadian physician, and his successful first book, FOB Doc, was the diary of his time “outside the wire” during that tour of duty. Captain Wiss' experience in Afghanistan convinced him that this conflict was a rare example of a moral war. When asked to return for an even longer tour of duty in the combat zone, he readily agreed. Once again, he kept a diary, writing with passion about the efforts, sacrifices and achievements of those Canadians who served with such distinction. Illustrated with over 100 colour photographs, A Line in the Sand tells us about virtually every kind of soldier fighting in Afghanistan: the bomb technician, the engineer, the combat medic, the “grunt” as well as about the Afghans, from whom we are seemingly so different yet with whom we share so much. It is an impassioned insider’s view of the war in Afghanistan and a convincing testament to why it matters.

Lines in the Sand

Collected Journalism

Author: A.A. Gill

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 675

'By miles the most brilliant journalist of our age' Lynn Barber 'A golden writer' Andrew Marr A. A. Gill was rightly hailed as one of the greatest journalists of our time. This selection of some of his recent pieces, which he made himself before his untimely death, spans the last five years from all corners of the world. It shows him at his most perceptive, brilliant and funny. His subjects range from the controversial - fur - to the heartfelt - a fantastic crystallisation of what it means to be European. He tackles life drawing, designs his own tweed, considers boyhood through the prism of the Museum of Childhood, and spends a day at Donald Trump's university. In his final two articles he wrote with characteristic wit and courage about his cancer diagnosis - 'the full English - and the limits of the NHS. But more than any other subject, a recurring theme emerges in the overwhelming story of our times: the refugee crisis. In the last few years A. A. Gill wrote with compassion and anger about the refugees' story, giving us both its human face and its appalling context. The resulting articles are journalism at its finest and fiercest.

Lines in the Sand

Author: Lyn Gala

Publisher: Dreamspinner Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 144

View: 620

Three years ago, Carl Ragar turned on the mob. His conscience couldn’t handle the murder of an innocent bystander, and he had to turn his back on his mentor, Petroc “Pete” Barbu, a man he’d admired and lusted after. Pete made no apologies for his job as an enforcer, but he’d never planned to get himself or Carl involved in the murder of a reporter. When Carl turned state’s evidence, Pete couldn’t even pretend to be surprised.

Lines in the Sand

An American Soldier's Personal Journey in Iraq

Author: F. Scott Service

Publisher: Hillcrest Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 442

View: 691

Faced with the dichotomy of his moral opposition to war and an innate sense of duty to his fellow soldiers little did F. Scott Service realize when he was called for deployment in Iraq that his tour of duty was destined to change him forever. Witnessing the violence of a country ravaged by chaos and facing the disintegration of his life back home, his sojourn in Iraq forced him to fight a new battle within himself and to question everything he had come to believe. What had once been a noble intention became a struggle to salvage what was left of his humanity, an excursion into the darkest recesses of the human mind. Pushed to the edge, only then would he discover what lay within. Author F. Scott Service recounts his wartime experience within an artfully lyrical epistolary composition transcribed from the handwritten journals he kept in Iraq. Lines in the Sand: An American Soldier's Personal Journey in Iraq is a powerful exercise in self-exploration amid heartwrenching loss and anguish.

Shifting Lines in the Sand

Kuwait's Elusive Frontier with Iraq

Author: David H. Finnie

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 221

View: 407

During the 1991 Gulf War, pundits and experts scrambled unsuccessfully to explain Iraq's âeoeclaimâe to Kuwait. In a lucid and measured account of a complex historical and geographic drama that culminated in Operation Desert Storm, David Finnie elucidates the long Kuwaiti-Iraqi border dispute and lays Saddam Hussein's dubious claim to rest. He also raises larger questions about European colonialism and about the creation of new nation-states in the Middle East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Finnie vividly portrays how arbitrary the drawing of frontiers can be, and how they come to serve internal, regional, and international rivalries and ambitions. This history begins in the eighteenth century, when Kuwait was first settled by nomads from the Arabian desert. Finnie describes the country's growing prosperity under a merchant oligarchy, then shows how the Kuwaitis, seeking British protection from the sprawling Ottoman Empire, came to serve England's imperial strategy. He details the ways in which Britain parlayed its mandatory control of Iraq and its protectorate over Kuwait to curb the larger nation's ambitions and to ensure Kuwait's independence under British auspices. A fresh look at British diplomatic documents reveals how Whitehall covered its tracks, heading off the Iraqis, obfuscating League of Nations proceedings, and confounding scholars and researchers down to the present day. Pursuing his story through Britain's withdrawal from the Persian Gulf and Iraq's 1963 recognition of Kuwait's boundaries, Finnie examines the U.N. post-war measures to secure the frontier in the face of Iraq's continuing pressure for better access to Gulf waters.

Lines in the Sand

Race and Class in Lowcountry Georgia, 1750-1860

Author: Timothy James Lockley

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 734

Lines in the Sandis Timothy Lockley’s nuanced look at the interaction between nonslaveholding whites and African Americans in lowcountry Georgia from the introduction of slavery in the state to the beginning of the Civil War. The study focuses on poor whites living in a society where they were dominated politically and economically by a planter elite and outnumbered by slaves. Lockley argues that the division between nonslaveholding whites and African Americans was not fixed or insurmountable. Pulling evidence from travel accounts, slave narratives, newspapers, and court documents, he reveals that these groups formed myriad kinds of relationships, sometimes out of mutual affection, sometimes for mutual advantage, but always in spite of the disapproving authority of the planter class. Lockley has synthesized an impressive amount of material to create a rich social history that illuminates the lives of both blacks and whites. His abundant detail and clear narrative style make this first book-length examination of a complicated and overlooked topic both fascinating and accessible.

Lines in the Sand

Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom DeLay

Author: Steve Bickerstaff

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 484

View: 211

The events of 2003 in Texas were important to the political history of this country. Congressman Tom DeLay led a Republican effort to gerrymander the state's thirty-two congressional districts to defeat all ten of the Anglo Democratic incumbents and to elect more Republicans; Democratic state lawmakers fled the state in an effort to defeat the plan. The Lone Star State uproar attracted attention worldwide. The Republicans won this showdown, gaining six additional seats from Texas and protecting the one endangered Republican incumbent. Some of the methods used by DeLay to achieve this result, however, led to his criminal indictment and ultimately to his downfall. With its eye-opening research, readable style, and insightful commentary, Lines in the Sand provides a front-line account of what happened in 2003, often through the personal stories of members of both parties and of the minority activist groups caught in a political vortex. Law professor Steve Bickerstaff provides much-needed historical perspective and also probes the aftermath of the 2003 redistricting, including the criminal prosecutions of DeLay and his associates and the events that led to DeLay's eventual resignation from the U.S. House of Representatives. As a result, Bickerstaff graphically shows a dark underside of American politics—the ruthless use of public institutional power for partisan gain.

Lines in the Sand

Author: Anne Deveson

Publisher: Penguin Books

ISBN:

Category: Relationships

Page: 330

View: 159

In 1975, at the age of twenty, Hannah Coady thinks she can change the world. Fiery and idealistic, she proves her mettle as a journalist in the terrible famine in Ethiopia, and is changed forever by the experience. But it's not just the starvation and the politics that change her, it's the beginning of a great love for two remarkable men: Waldo, a cynical but endearing British filmmaker, and Ezekiel, a Rwandan radical whose fervour is a match for Hannah's own. Over the decades Hannah's commitment is frequently tested in the international disaster zones she covers. She moves in a world of sometimes comic absurdity, where people struggle to make sense of some of the major political issues of our time. Her connections with Waldo and Ezekiel ebb and flow, until in 1994, in the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda, the unthinkable happens ...