The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln

Author: Abraham Lincoln

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 568

View: 594

The collected letters, speeches, etc. written by Abraham Lincoln.

LIFE & WORKS OF ABRAHAM LINCOL

Author: Abraham 1809-1865 Lincoln

Publisher: Wentworth Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 354

View: 336

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The True Mary Todd Lincoln

A Biography

Author: Betty Boles Ellison

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 300

View: 306

This new biography provides a startlingly different picture of Mary Lincoln, President Abraham Lincoln’s wife. Preconceived myths about the former first lady are factually disproved. At times her judgment was faulty; in other instances it was brilliant. After her 1861 refurbishing of the Executive Mansion, she made no further furnishings purchases, only replacement items. The furniture she purchased is still in use and the Lincoln bed is well known. Committed to an insane asylum by her only surviving son, she organized, while under constant scrutiny, her friends in a skillfully successful scheme to obtain her freedom and resume control of her life and money. Mary Todd Lincoln had a brilliant mind, a caring heart and an exuberant personality and she was, in every aspect, a true partner to Abraham Lincoln.

Abraham Lincoln

A History

Author: John George Nicolay

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Presidents

Page:

View: 99

The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln – Volume 7: 1863-1865

Author: Abraham Lincoln

Publisher: Litres

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 330

View: 346

Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865) is one of the most famous Americans in history and one of the country’s most revered presidents. Schoolchildren can recite the life story of Lincoln, the “Westerner” who educated himself and became a self made man, rising from lawyer to leader of the new Republican Party before becoming the 16th President of the United States. Lincoln successfully navigated the Union through the Civil War but didn’t live to witness his own accomplishment, becoming the first president assassinated when he was killed at Ford’s Theater by John Wilkes Booth. As impressive as his presidency was, one of his most lasting legacies was his writing. In addition to masterful writing for everything from orders to his generals and condolences to the aggrieved Mrs. Bixby, his Second Inaugural Address and Gettysburg Address are considered masterpieces that rate among the greatest writings in American history. Perhaps Lincoln’s most impressive feat is that he was able to convey so much with so few words; after famous orator Edward Everett spoke for hours at Gettysburg, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address only took a few minutes. In the generation after the Civil War, Lincoln became an American deity and one of the most written about men in history. Understandably, all of his writings and papers were intently scoured and collected, and they’ve been preserved in seven volumes of Papers and Writings.

McClellan and the Union High Command, 1861äóñ1863

Leadership Gaps That Cost a Timely Victory

Author: Jeffrey W. Green

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 494

With Washington’s proximity to the Confederate capital of Richmond, Union military operations in the first two years of the Civil War focused mainly on the Eastern Theater, where General McClellan commanded the Army of the Potomac. McClellan’s “On to Richmond” battle cry dominated strategic thinking in the high command. When he failed and was sacked by President Lincoln, a coterie of senior officers sought his return. This re-examination of the high command and McClellan’s war in the East provides a broader understanding of the Union’s inability to achieve victory in the first two years, and takes the debate about the Union’s leadership into new areas.

Union General John A. McClernand and the Politics of Command

Author: Christopher C. Meyers

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 495

John A. McClernand was a career politician, and those ambitions and qualities continued during his Civil War service. A member of the Illinois General Assembly and a U.S. Representative for 10 years, McClernard was connected to other prominent figures of the time such as Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas. However, he is best known for his rivalry with Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, and this biography balances McClernard’s political career with his military leadership and his place in the Union command structure.

Lincolnites and Rebels

A Divided Town in the American Civil War

Author: Robert Tracy McKenzie

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 662

At the start of the Civil War, Knoxville, Tennessee, with a population of just over 4,000, was considered a prosperous metropolis little reliant on slavery. Although the surrounding countryside was predominantly Unionist in sympathy, Knoxville itself was split down the middle, with Union and Confederate supporters even holding simultaneous political rallies at opposite ends of the town's main street. Following Tennessee's secession, Knoxville soon became famous (or infamous) as a stronghold of stalwart Unionism, thanks to the efforts of a small cadre who persisted in openly denouncing the Confederacy. Throughout the course of the Civil War, Knoxville endured military occupation for all but three days, hosting Confederate troops during the first half of the conflict and Union forces throughout the remainder, with the transition punctuated by an extended siege and bloody battle during which nearly forty thousand soldiers fought over the town. In Lincolnites and Rebels, Robert Tracy McKenzie tells the story of Civil War Knoxville-a perpetually occupied, bitterly divided Southern town where neighbor fought against neighbor. Mining a treasure-trove of manuscript collections and civil and military records, McKenzie reveals the complex ways in which allegiance altered the daily routine of a town gripped in a civil war within the Civil War and explores the agonizing personal decisions that war made inescapable. Following the course of events leading up to the war, occupation by Confederate and then Union soldiers, and the troubled peace that followed the war, Lincolnites and Rebels details in microcosm the conflict and paints a complex portrait of a border state, neither wholly North nor South.

Indispensable

When Leaders Really Matter

Author: Gautam Mukunda

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 272

View: 477

Will your next leader be insignificant—or indispensable? The importance of leadership and the impact of individual leaders has long been the subject of debate. Are they made by history, or do they make it? In Indispensable, Harvard Business School professor Gautam Mukunda offers an enticingly fresh look at how and when individual leaders really can make a difference. By identifying and analyzing the hidden patterns of their careers, and by exploring the systems that place these leaders in positions of power, Indispensable sheds new light on how we may be able to identify the best leaders and what lessons we can learn, from both the process and the result. Profiling a mix of historic and modern figures—from Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln to Winston Churchill and Judah Folkman—and telling the stories of how they came to power and how they made the most important decisions of their lives, Indispensable reveals how, when, and where a single individual in the right place at the right time can save or destroy the organization they lead, and even change the course of history. Indispensable will also help you understand this new model so you can use it in your own life—whether you’re a citizen casting a ballot, an executive choosing your next CEO, or a leader trying to make your mark.

The Abraham Lincoln Quarterly, Vol. 7, No. 2

Author: Abraham Lincoln Association

Publisher: Wildside Press LLC

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 52

View: 967

The June 1952 issue reports the annual meeting of The Abraham Lincoln Association on February 12, 1952, including A presentation by Adlai Stevenson, then-governor of Illinois, on Lincoln as a Political Leader.

1824-1848

Index

Author: Abraham Lincoln

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Presidents

Page:

View: 747

The Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864

Author: Gary W. Gallagher

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 282

"The eleven essays in this volume re-examine common assumptions about the campaign, its major figures, and its significance. Taking advantage of the most recent scholarship and a wide range of primary sources, contributors examine strategy and tactics, the performances of key commanders on each side, the campaign's political repercussions, and the experiences of civilians caught in the path of the armies. The authors do not always agree with one another, but, taken together, their essays highlight important connections between the home front and the battlefield, as well as ways in which military affairs, civilian experience, and politics played off one another during the campaign."--BOOK JACKET.

McClellan's War

Author: Ethan S. Rafuse

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 545

View: 274

“An important book that rescues George B. McClellan’s military reputation.” —Chronicles Bold, brash, and full of ambition, George Brinton McClellan seemed destined for greatness when he assumed command of all the Union armies before he was 35. It was not to be. Ultimately deemed a failure on the battlefield by Abraham Lincoln, he was finally dismissed from command following the bloody battle of Antietam. To better understand this fascinating, however flawed, character, Ethan S. Rafuse considers the broad and complicated political climate of the earlier 19th Century. Rather than blaming McClellan for the Union’s military losses, Rafuse attempts to understand his political thinking as it affected his wartime strategy. As a result, Rafuse sheds light not only on McClellan’s conduct on the battlefields of 1861-62 but also on United States politics and culture in the years leading up to the Civil War. “Any historian seriously interested in the period will come away from the book with useful material and a better understanding of George B. McClellan.” —Journal of Southern History “Exhaustively researched and lucidly written, Rafuse has done an excellent job in giving us a different perspective on ‘Little Mac.’” —Civil War History “Rafuse’s thoughtful study of Little Mac shows just how enthralling this complex and flawed individual continues to be.” —Blue & Gray magazine

Negro Labor in the United States, 1850-1925

A Study in American Economic History

Author: Charles Harris Wesley

Publisher: New York : Russell

ISBN:

Category: African Americans

Page: 343

View: 473

A sympathetic history of African American workers from 1850-1925. The author traces the attempts to organize themselves or to join white labor unions; also includes many statistics on numbers of skilled & unskilled workers, workers having savings accounts, movement from south to north, occupations, etc.

Lincoln and McClellan

The Troubled Partnership between a President and His General

Author: John C. Waugh

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 320

There was no more remarkable pair in the Civil War than Abraham Lincoln and George McClellan. At only 35 years old, McClellan commanded the Ohio troops early in the war, and won skirmishes for the Union in western Virginia. After the disastrous Union defeat at Bull Run in the summer of 1861, Lincoln sent word for McClellan to come to Washington, and soon elevated him to commander-in-chief of the Union army. But in the late summer and fall of 1861, things took a turn for the worst. Meticulous in his planning and preparations, McClellan began to delay attacking the enemy and developed a penchant for vastly overestimating the Confederate forces he faced. All of this hampered his ability to lead an aggressive force in a fast-moving battlefield environment. Finally losing his patience, Lincoln was famously quoted as saying, "If General McClellan does not want to use the army, I would like to borrow it for a time." Lincoln and McClellan takes an in-depth look at this fascinating relationship, from the early days of the Civil War to the 1864 presidential election when McClellan ran against Lincoln on an anti-war platform and lost. Here, award-winning author John C. Waugh weaves a tale of hubris, paranoia, failure, and triumph, illuminating as never before this unique and complicated alliance.

This Unhappy Country

The Turn of the Civil War, 1863

Author: James R. Arnold

Publisher: Lerner Publications

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 72

View: 596

Discusses the Battles of Vicksburg, Gettysburg, Chancellorsville, and Chattanooga, all of which had a major impact on the outcome of the Civil War.

Myths and Nationhood

Author: George Schopflin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 256

View: 283

First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Age of Lincoln and the Art of American Power, 1848-1876

Author: William Nester

Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 392

View: 404

Although Abraham Lincoln was among seven presidents who served during the tumultuous years between the end of the Mexican War and the end of the Reconstruction era, history has not been kind to the others: Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, Andrew Johnson, and Ulysses S. Grant. In contrast, history sees Abraham Lincoln as a giant in character and deeds. During his presidency, he governed brilliantly, developed the economy, liberated four million people from slavery, reunified the nation, and helped enact the Homestead Act, among other accomplishments. He proved to be not only an outstanding commander in chief but also a skilled diplomat, economist, humanist, educator, and moralist. Lincoln achieved that and more because he was a master of the art of American power. He understood that the struggle for hearts and minds was the essence of politics in a democracy. He asserted power mostly by appealing to peopleÆs hopes rather than their fears. All along he tried to shape rather than reflect prevailing public opinions that differed from his own. To that end, he was brilliant at bridging the gap between progressives and conservatives by reining in the former and urging on the latter. His art of power ultimately reflected his unswerving devotion to the Declaration of IndependenceÆs principles and the ConstitutionÆs institutions, or as he so elegantly expressed it, ôto a government of the people, by the people, and for the people.ö