Letters of Theo. Brown

Author: Theo Brown

Publisher: BiblioBazaar, LLC

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 563

This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.

Annual Report

Author: Lancaster (Mass.). Town Library

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 167

The Yanks Are Coming Over There

Anglo-Saxonism and American Involvement in the First World War

Author: Dino E. Buenviaje

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 438

World War I was a global cataclysm that toppled centuries-old dynasties and launched "the American century." Yet at the outset few Americans saw any reason to get involved in yet another conflict among the crowned heads of Europe. Despite its declared neutrality, the U.S. government gradually became more sympathetic with the Allies, until President Woodrow Wilson asked Congress to declare war on Germany to "make the world safe for democracy." Key to this shift in policy and public opinion was the belief that the English-speaking peoples were inherently superior and fit for world leadership. Just before the war, British and American elites set aside former disputes and recognized their potential for dominating the international stage. By casting Germans as "barbarians" and spreading stories of atrocities, the Wilson administration persuaded the public--including millions of German Americans--that siding with the Allies was a just cause.

Law and Letters in American Culture

Author: Robert A. Ferguson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 417

View: 955

Argues that after the American Revolution lawyers replaced clergy as the dominant intellectual force, and looks at how legal educations affected the aesthetics of early American writers

By More Than Providence

Grand Strategy and American Power in the Asia Pacific Since 1783

Author: Michael J. Green

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 728

View: 976

Soon after the American Revolution, ?certain of the founders began to recognize the strategic significance of Asia and the Pacific and the vast material and cultural resources at stake there. Over the coming generations, the United States continued to ask how best to expand trade with the region and whether to partner with China, at the center of the continent, or Japan, looking toward the Pacific. Where should the United States draw its defensive line, and how should it export democratic principles? In a history that spans the eighteenth century to the present, Michael J. Green follows the development of U.S. strategic thinking toward East Asia, identifying recurring themes in American statecraft that reflect the nation's political philosophy and material realities. Drawing on archives, interviews, and his own experience in the Pentagon and White House, Green finds one overarching concern driving U.S. policy toward East Asia: a fear that a rival power might use the Pacific to isolate and threaten the United States and prevent the ocean from becoming a conduit for the westward free flow of trade, values, and forward defense. By More Than Providence works through these problems from the perspective of history's major strategists and statesmen, from Thomas Jefferson to Alfred Thayer Mahan and Henry Kissinger. It records the fate of their ideas as they collided with the realities of the Far East and adds clarity to America's stakes in the region, especially when compared with those of Europe and the Middle East.

Theodore Roosevelt in the Field

Author: Michael R. Canfield

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 476

View: 877

"Draws extensively on the 26th President's field notebooks, diaries and letters to share insight into how Roosevelt's field expeditions shaped his character and political polices, covering his teen ornithology adventures, Badlands travels and safaris in Africa and South America, "--NoveList.

Toward the Making of Thoreau's Modern Reputation

Selected Correspondence of S. A. Jones, A. W. Hosmer, H. S. Salt, H. G. O. Blake, and D. Ricketson

Author: Samuel Arthur Jones

Publisher: Urbana : University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 413

View: 977

Henry David Thoreau

A Reference Guide, 1835-1899

Author: Raymond R. Borst

Publisher: G K Hall

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 147

View: 201

The Longest Line on the Map

The United States, the Pan-American Highway, and the Quest to Link the Americas

Author: Eric Rutkow

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 271

From the award-winning author of American Canopy, a dazzling account of the world’s longest road, the Pan-American Highway, and the epic quest to link North and South America, a dramatic story of commerce, technology, politics, and the divergent fates of the Americas in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Pan-American Highway, monument to a century’s worth of diplomacy and investment, education and engineering, scandal and sweat, is the longest road in the world, passable everywhere save the mythic Darien Gap that straddles Panama and Colombia. The highway’s history, however, has long remained a mystery, a story scattered among government archives, private papers, and fading memories. In contrast to the Panama Canal and its vast literature, the Pan-American Highway—the United States’ other great twentieth-century hemispheric infrastructure project—has become an orphan of the past, effectively erased from the story of the “American Century.” The Longest Line on the Map uncovers this incredible tale for the first time and weaves it into a tapestry that fascinates, informs, and delights. Rutkow’s narrative forces the reader to take seriously the question: Why couldn’t the Americas have become a single region that “is” and not two near irreconcilable halves that “are”? Whether you’re fascinated by the history of the Americas, or you’ve dreamed of driving around the globe, or you simply love world records and the stories behind them, The Longest Line on the Map is a riveting narrative, a lost epic of hemispheric scale.

The Annual American Catalogue 1886-1900

Being the Full Titles, with Descriptive Notes, of All Books Recorded in the Publishers' Weekly, 1886-1900 with Author, Title, and Subject Index, Publishers' Annual Lists, and Directory of Publishers

Author:

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Category: American literature

Page:

View: 408

Women and Reform in a New England Community, 1815-1860

Author: Carolyn J. Lawes

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 265

View: 329

Interpretations of women in the antebellum period have long dwelt upon the notion of public versus private gender spheres. As part of the ongoing reevaluation of the prehistory of the women's movement, Carolyn Lawes challenges this paradigm and the primacy of class motivation. She studies the women of antebellum Worcester, Massachusetts, discovering that whatever their economic background, women there publicly worked to remake and improve their community in their own image. Lawes analyzes the organized social activism of the mostly middle-class, urban, white women of Worcester and finds that they were at the center of community life and leadership. Drawing on rich local history collections, Lawes weaves together information from city and state documents, court cases, medical records, church collections, newspapers, and diaries and letters to create a portrait of a group of women for whom constant personal and social change was the norm. Throughout Women and Reform in a New England Community, conventional women make seemingly unconventional choices. A wealthy Worcester matron helped spark a women-led rebellion against ministerial authority in the town's orthodox Calvinist church. Similarly, a close look at the town's sewing circles reveals that they were vehicles for political exchange as well as social gatherings that included men but intentionally restricted them to a subordinate role. By the middle of the nineteenth century, the women of Worcester had taken up explicitly political and social causes, such as an orphan asylum they founded, funded, and directed. Lawes argues that economic and personal instability rather than a desire for social control motivated women, even relatively privileged ones, into social activism. She concludes that the local activism of the women of Worcester stimulated, and was stimulated by, their interest in the first two national women's rights conventions, held in Worcester in 1850 and 1851. Far from being marginalized from the vital economic, social, and political issues of their day, the women of this antebellum New England community insisted upon being active and ongoing participants in the debates and decisions of their society and nation.