The Legendary Norden Bombsight

Author: Albert L. Pardini

Publisher: Schiffer Military History

ISBN:

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: 352

View: 990

A detailed volume covering the famous Norden Bombsight (NBS) which was one of the most secret weapons used before and during World War II by the United States in its bomber aircraft. The NBS was again called to duty in 1967-67 during the Vietnam War.

The Sound of Freedom

Naval Weapons Technology at Dahlgren, Virginia, 1918-2006

Author: James P. Rife

Publisher: Department of the Navy

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 468

View: 775

Tells the story of the evolution of the Dahlgren Laboratory from a proof and test facility into a modern research and development center crucial to the technological evolution of the United States Navy.

"The Three Musketeers of the Army Air Forces"

From Hitler's Fortress Europa to Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Author: Robert O. Harder

Publisher: Naval Institute Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 403

While scores of books have been published about the atomic bombings that helped end World War II, little has been written about the personal lives and relationship of the three men that led the raid. Paul Tibbets, Tom Ferebee, and Ted “Dutch” Van Kirk exemplified what Life Magazine meant when in 1942 it called the B-17 pilot, bombardier, and navigator “the three musketeers of the Army Air Forces.” A former navigator-bombardier and pilot himself, Harder brings a fresh perspective to an otherwise well-known narrative. He provides a rare insider’s look at exactly who these three fellows were, how they were trained, what they meant to each other, and finally how everything coalesced into the Hiroshima and Nagasaki attacks.

Birth of a Legend

The Bomber Mafia and the Y1b-17

Author: Capt Arthur H. Wagner Uscg (Ret)

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 544

Competition for Army acquisition funding in the betrween wars depression years was fierce. The opposing camps of Fighter Supremacy versus Strategic Bombing played out at the Air Corps Tactical School (ACTS), at GHQ, before Congress and in the media. Military exercises pitted the Navy and the Air Corps in operations with real cloak and dagger background gambits, each trying to gain the upper hand. When leaders such as Benjamin Foulois, Billy Mitchell, and Frank Andrews eventually were able to foster a bomber competition to replace the Martin B-10, Boeing's four-engined Model 299 was a clear winner; but then it crashed at Dayton, and the Army opted for the Douglas B-18. Somehow, Frank Andrews had enough faith in his convictions and managed to have 13 Y1B-17s produced and sent to the 2nd Bombardment Group at Langley Field, VA. There Robert Olds and his three squadrons enthralled the country with long range goodwill flights, transcontinental speed runs with an obscure 1st Lt Curtis leMay navigating the way, and a thrilling movie "Test Pilot" starring Clark Gable, Myrna Loy, and Spencer Tracy. Fortunately for the trials of WWII, these daring young men of the Army Air Corps put their careers on the line, and made the B-17 one of the iconic weapons of that conflict. This is the untold story of the aircraft development and the men who made it happen.

Birth of a Legend

The Bomber Mafia and the Y1b-17

Author: LtCol Leon E. Braxton USAF

Publisher: Trafford Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 312

View: 685

Competition for Army acquisition funding in the betrween wars depression years was fierce. The opposing camps of Fighter Supremacy versus Strategic Bombing played out at the Air Corps Tactical School (ACTS), at GHQ, before Congress and in the media. Military exercises pitted the Navy and the Air Corps in operations with real cloak and dagger background gambits, each trying to gain the upper hand. When leaders such as Benjamin Foulois, Billy Mitchell, and Frank Andrews eventually were able to foster a bomber competition to replace the Martin B-10, Boeing's four-engined Model 299 was a clear winner; but then it crashed at Dayton, and the Army opted for the Douglas B-18. Somehow, Frank Andrews had enough faith in his convictions and managed to have 13 Y1B-17s produced and sent to the 2nd Bombardment Group at Langley Field, VA. There Robert Olds and his three squadrons enthralled the country with long range goodwill flights, transcontinental speed runs with an obscure 1st Lt Curtis leMay navigating the way, and a thrilling movie "Test Pilot" starring Clark Gable, Myrna Loy, and Spencer Tracy. Fortunately for the trials of WWII, these daring young men of the Army Air Corps put their careers on the line, and made the B-17 one of the iconic weapons of that conflict. This is the untold story of the aircraft development and the men who made it happen.

Weston Fulton in Tennessee: Edison of the South

Author: Dewaine A. Speaks

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 584

Being an inventor at the dawning of the twentieth century was an exciting time for Weston Fulton, Tennessee's most prolific. The Industrial Revolution was well underway, and technology was changing rapidly. Because of Fulton's numerous inventions and patent requests, the U.S. Patent Office dedicated a room solely to his applications, and the press began calling him the "Edison of the South." His most important invention, the seamless metal bellows, has gone to the bottom of the sea as the triggering device for the U.S. Navy's depth charges and to the surface of the Moon to help supply drinking water for the astronauts. Dewaine Speaks, a longtime employee of the company founded by Fulton, gives a detailed description of the many ways Fulton's inventions have influenced mankind.

East Tennessee in World War II

Author: Dewaine A. Speaks

Publisher: Arcadia Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 427

Like every other red-blooded American, East Tennessee residents did all they could to help end World War II. Locals like "Petie" Siler signed up for service, despite having fought in World War I. Oak Ridge residents worked expeditiously on the Manhattan Project, gathering uranium-235 to fuel the first atomic bomb. Knoxville's Rohm & Haas Chemical Company branch furnished Plexiglas for aircraft. Military veterans Dewaine A. Speaks and Dr. Ray Clift detail the unified sacrifices and contributions of East Tennessee's honorable soldiers and civilians.

The Bomber Mafia

A Story Set in War

Author: Malcolm Gladwell

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 256

View: 621

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER 'A parable written for the age of technological disruption . . . brilliantly told' Sunday Times The international bestselling author returns with an exploration of one of the grandest obsessions of the twentieth century 'The Bomber Mafia is a case study in how dreams go awry. When some shiny new idea drops from the heavens, it does not land softly in our laps. It lands hard, on the ground, and shatters.' In the years before the Second World War, in a sleepy air force base in central Alabama, a small group of renegade pilots put forth a radical idea. What if we made bombing so accurate that wars could be fought entirely from the air? What if we could make the brutal clashes between armies on the ground a thing of the past? This book tells the story of what happened when that dream was put to the test. The Bomber Mafia follows the stories of a reclusive Dutch genius and his homemade computer, Winston Churchill's forbidding best friend, a team of pyromaniacal chemists at Harvard, a brilliant pilot who sang vaudeville tunes to his crew, and the bomber commander, Curtis Emerson LeMay, who would order the bloodiest attack of the Second World War. In this tale of innovation and obsession, Gladwell asks: what happens when technology and best intentions collide in the heat of war? And what is the price of progress?

Lectures of the Air Corps Tactical School and American Strategic Bombing in World War II

Author: Phil Haun

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 797

Following the cataclysmic losses suffered in World War I, air power theorists in Europe advocated for long-range bombers to overfly the trenches and strike deep into the enemy's heartland. The bombing of cities was seen as a means to collapse the enemy's will to resist and bring the war to a quick end. In the United States, airmen called for an independent air force, but with the nation's return to isolationism, there was little appetite for an offensive air power doctrine. By the 1930s, however, a cadre of officers at the US Army Air Corps Tactical School (ACTS) had articulated an operational concept of high-altitude daylight precision bombing (HADPB) that would be the foundation for a uniquely American vision of strategic air attack. In Lectures of the Air Corps Tactical School and American Strategic Bombing in World War II editor Phil Haun brings together nine ACTS lecture transcripts, which have been preserved in Air Force archives, exactly as delivered to the airmen destined to lead the US Army Air Forces in World War II. Presented is a distinctive American strategy of high-altitude daylight precision bombing as told through lectures given at the ACTS during the interwar period and how these airmen put the theory to the test. The book examines the Air Corps theory of HADPB as compared to the reality of combat in World War II by relying on recent, revisionist histories that have given scholars a deeper understanding of the impact of strategic bombing on Germany.

Man and Machine

The Best of Stephan Wilkinson

Author: Stephan Wilkinson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Transportation

Page: 208

View: 981

"They sit on a spur of test track outside General Electric's locomotive factory in Erie, Pennsylvania, panting and grumbling like two old lions half asleep. The ominous, muttering rumble is the idle of 8,800 horsepower--24 cylinders with pistons big as buckets, turbochargers the size of washing machines, two V12 engines driving alternators five feet in diameter. For here are two units of the most advanced diesel-electric locomotives in the world: a pair of GE Evolutions."--Excerpt from "Do the Locomotion" in Man and Machine Stephan Wilkinson--a longtime expert on the ways men entertain themselves when no one is telling them what to do--takes readers into the high-speed, high-risk world of restored jets, fast boats, and Formula 1 cars. Wilkinson visits a factory where Amish men build custom ambulances, flies an airliner from the glory days of air travel, meets a bird that is a killing machine, and has a hot date with a handgun. In another chapter, Wilkinson relates the hazards of flying purely on instruments, and why being able to do so can make the difference between life and death. He draws from his own misadventures in flight and explains exactly why the high-end Beech Bonanza is known as “the doctor killer.” And dissecting the finely tuned instrument that is the Formula 1 car, Wilkinson relates how the engine's connecting rods actually stretch at 19,000 rpm, even though they're made of titanium, and what can happen when a racecar brakes at 6Gs. Always entertaining, Wilkinson takes men, and maybe even a few women, where they love to go--under the hood, over the mechanic's shoulder, and behind the wheel.