Law, Disorder and the Colonial State

Corruption in Burma c.1900

Author: J. Saha

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 166

View: 675

In this original study British rule in Burma is examined through quotidian acts of corruption. Saha outlines a novel way to study the colonial state as it was experienced in everyday life, revealing a complex world of state practices where legality and illegality were inseparable: the informal world upon which formal colonial power rested.

Law and Disorder in Cyberspace

Abolish the FCC and Let Common Law Rule the Telecosm

Author: Peter William Huber

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 265

View: 878

When the U.S. Congress created the Federal Radio Commission in 1927, what we now call cyberspace was just "ether." Broadcasting had only begun to carry tinny human voices and music across the fields and prairies, while Sunday afternoon phone calls to Aunt Mabel snaked through wires below, courtesy of an army of operators who switched each circuit by hand. It didn't take long, though, for the wires and airwaves to fill up with untrammeled chatter, so much so that by 1934 after complaints by the Navy that ship to shore communications had become hopelessly chaotic, and under the unproved but widely held belief that the broadcast spectrum was a finite natural resource all federal authority over electronic communications was forged into a new, powerful Federal Communications Commission. The amount of information traversing the airwaves has increased a million fold since 1927, but has the FCC changed along with the technology? The answer, according to Peter W. Huber, in Law and Disorder in Cyberspace: Abolish the FCC and Let Common Law Rule the Telecosm, is an emphatic No. In this well researched, lively, even witty polemic, Huber recounts the history of telecommunications over the last century to argue that the FCC "should have been extinguished years ago." With scarcity of communications channels no longer an issue, and the virtual elimination of distinctions between carriage and broadcast,the Commission's anachronistic laws have no basis for existence, and have in fact impeded growth and progress to the tune of billions of lost dollars. Today, the "telecosm," that complex universe of invisible communications traffic, has expanded, supplanted, and subdivided itself many times over with each new technological breakthrough. Cable television, direct broadcast satellite, cell phones, the V chip, Caller ID, personal computers, and the Internet have transformed the world. Huber argues that large bureaucratic entities like the FCC fail to adjust to such rapidly changing technologies because they see their mission as maintaining the status quo, and that instead of preserving the rights of common citizens they actually favor rich monopolies. Addressing charged points of conflict such as free speech vs. censorship, privacy vs. right to know, and market vs. controlled pricing, Law and Disorder in Cyberspace energetically proposes that sensible national telecommunications policies evolve through common law--the accretion of decisions arrived at in specific cases where basic principles such as private property and fair business practice are challenged and upheld--and not through the top down, government imposition of inflexible regulatory mandates created in the vacuum of uninformed, theoretical disussion. Given the heated climate on Capitol Hill surrounding debate over ways to reduce federal spending, Peter Huber's arguments are timely, urgent, and meticulously documented. Law and Disorder in Cyberspace is not only informative and entertaining, but will be one of those rare books that will influences public policy before the end of this decade.

Law & Disorder:

Inside the Dark Heart of Murder

Author: John Douglas

Publisher: Pinnacle Books

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 416

View: 251

"Fascinating." --Douglas Preston John Douglas is. . . "The FBI's pioneer and master of investigative profiling." –Patricia Cornwell "At his best describing terrible crimes." –Houston Chronicle "A real genius." –Entertainment Weekly "At the top of his form." –James Patterson It is mankind's most abominable crime: murder. No one is better acquainted with the subject and its wrenching challenges than John Douglas, the FBI's pioneer of criminal profiling, and the model for Agent Jack Crawford in The Silence of the Lambs. In this provocative and deeply personal book, the most prominent criminal investigator of our time offers a rare look into the workings not only of the justice system--but of his own heart and mind. Writing with award-winning partner Mark Olshaker, Douglas opens up about his most notorious and baffling cases--and shows what it's like to confront evil in its most monstrous form. "Douglas can claim a rare authenticity regarding the evil that men do." --Kirkus Reviews "A fascinating and, at times, graphic tour of the criminal mind." --Library Journal Includes dramatic photos

Law and Disorder in the Postcolony

Author: Jean Comaroff

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 233

Are postcolonies haunted more by criminal violence than other nation-states? The usual answer is yes. In Law and Disorder in the Postcolony, Jean and John Comaroff and a group of respected theorists show that the question is misplaced: that the predicament of postcolonies arises from their place in a world order dominated by new modes of governance, new sorts of empires, new species of wealth—an order that criminalizes poverty and race, entraps the “south” in relations of corruption, and displaces politics into the realms of the market, criminal economies, and the courts. As these essays make plain, however, there is another side to postcoloniality: while postcolonies live in states of endemic disorder, many of them fetishize the law, its ways and itsmeans. How is the coincidence of disorder with a fixation on legalities to be explained? Law and Disorder in the Postcolony addresses this question, entering into critical dialogue with such theorists as Benjamin, Agamben, and Bayart. In the process, it also demonstrates how postcolonies have become crucial sites for the production of contemporary theory, not least because they are harbingers of a global future under construction.

Law & Disorder

The Chaotic Birth of the NYPD

Author: Bruce Chadwick

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 691

Nineteenth-century New York City was one of the most magnificent cities in the world, but also one of the most deadly. Without any real law enforcement for almost 200 years, the city was a lawless place where the crime rate was triple what it is today and the murder rate was five or six times as high. The staggering amount of crime threatened to topple a city that was experiencing meteoric growth and striving to become one of the most spectacular in America. For the first time, award-winning historian Bruce Chadwick examines how rampant violence led to the founding of the first professional police force in New York City. Chadwick brings readers into the bloody and violent city, where race relations and an influx of immigrants boiled over into riots, street gangs roved through town with abandon, and thousands of bars, prostitutes, and gambling emporiums clogged the streets. The drive to establish law and order and protect the city involved some of New York’s biggest personalities, including mayor Fernando Wood, police chief Fred Tallmadge, and journalist Walt Whitman. Law and Disorder is a must read for fans of New York history and those interested in how the first police force, untrained and untested, battled to maintain law and order.

Law and disorder

poems & pictures : remarks by sparrows, chimney sweeps, generals, old kings, madmen, poets, dancers, law enforcers & others

Author: Günter Bruno Fuchs

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 77

View: 424

Law and Disorder: Absurdly Funny Moments from the Courts

Author: Charles M. Sevilla

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 192

View: 356

More hilarious, unbelievable-but-true stories from our nation’s courts, from the author of Disorder in the Court and Disorderly Conduct. Charles M. Sevilla finds comic gems in court transcripts—and now brings readers a delightful, all-new collection. Starting with a chapter on the defendants (one of whom, when asked his marital status, replies after a long pause, "Adequate") and following with sections on lawyers, experts, witnesses, evidence, and even one called "Malaprops" (DA: The status of the boat has no relevance to this case at all. This is a total fishing expedition). Stories from Sevilla's previous books have become viral Internet sensations, priming readers for more legal disorder, such as: Clerk: Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to given in the cause now pending before this court shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? Witness: Yes, I swear. I’ll say anything but the truth, nothing but the truth.

Stanley Fish on Philosophy, Politics and Law

How Fish Works

Author: Michael Robertson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page:

View: 837

Fish's writings on philosophy, politics and law comprise numerous books and articles produced over many decades. This book connects those dots in order to reveal the overall structure of his argument and to demonstrate how his work in politics and law flows logically from his philosophical stands on the nature of the self, epistemology and the role of theory. Michael Robertson considers Fish's political critiques of liberalism, critical theory, postmodernism and pragmatism before turning to his observations on political substance and political practice. The detailed analysis of Fish's jurisprudence explores his relationships to legal positivism, legal formalism, legal realism and critical legal studies, as well as his debate with Ronald Dworkin. Gaps and inconsistencies in Fish's arguments are fully explored, and the author provides a description of Fish's own positive account of law and deals with the charge that Fish is an indeterminacy theorist who undermines the rule of law.

Sociology of Mental Disorder

Author: William C. Cockerham

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 591

The tenth edition of Sociology of Mental Disorder presents the major issues and research findings on the influence of race, social class, gender, and age on the incidence and prevalence of mental disorder. The text also examines the institutions that help those with mental disorders, mental health law, and public policy. Many important updates are new to this edition: -More first-person accounts of individuals who suffer from mental illness are included. -The new DSM-5 is now thoroughly covered along with the controversy surrounding it. -A new section on on social class and its components. -Updated assessment of the relationship between mental health and gender. - A revised and in-depth discussion of mental health and race. -New material on public policy, mental disorder, and the Affordable Health Care Act. -Updates of research and citations throughout.

Law and disorder

the legitimation of direct action as an instrument of social policy

Author: Samuel I. Shuman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 236

View: 852