The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

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Author: Mark Twain

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ISBN:

Category:

Page: 130

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Here is the story of Tom, Huck, Becky, and Aunt Polly; a tale of adventures, pranks, playing hookey, and summertime fun. Written by the author sometimes called "the Lincoln of literature," The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was surprisingly neither a critical nor a financial success when it was first published in 1876. It was Mark Twain's first novel. However, since then Tom Sawyer has become his most popular work, enjoying dramatic, film, and even Broadway musical interpretations.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Large Print

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 190

View: 493

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, is a popular 1876 novel about a young boy growing up in the antebellum South on the Mississippi River in the fictional town of St. Petersburg, Missouri.

Adventures of HUCLKEBERRY FINN - Large Print

Tom Sawyer's Comrade

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 282

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YOU don't know about me without you have read a book by thename of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter. Thatbook was made by Mr. Mark Twain, and he told the truth, mainly.There was things which he stretched, but mainly he told the truth.That is nothing. I never seen anybody but lied one time or another,without it was Aunt Polly, or the widow, or maybe Mary. Aunt Polly-Tom's Aunt Polly, she is-and Mary, and the Widow Douglas is all toldabout in that book, which is mostly a true book, with some stretchers,as I said before.Now the way that the book winds up is this: Tom and me found themoney that the robbers hid in the cave, and it made us rich. We gotsix thousand dollars apiece-all gold. It was an awful sight of moneywhen it was piled up. Well, Judge Thatcher he took it and put it out atinterest, and it fetched us a dollar a day apiece all the year round-more than a body could tell what to do with. The Widow Douglas shetook me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it wasrough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regularand decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn'tstand it no longer I lit out. I got into my old rags and my sugarhogsheadagain, and was free and satisfied. But Tom Sawyer hehunted me up and said he was going to start a band of robbers, and Imight join if I would go back to the widow and be respectable. So Iwent back.The widow she cried over me, and called me a poor lost lamb, andshe called me a lot of other names, too, but she never meant no harmby it. She put me in them new clothes again, and I couldn't do nothingbut sweat and sweat, and feel all cramped up. Well, then, the oldthing commenced again. The widow rung a bell for supper, and youhad to come to time. When you got to the table you couldn't go right toeating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head andgrumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anythingthe matter with them,-that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself. In a barrel of odds and ends it is different; things get mixed up,and the juice kind of swaps around, and the things go better.After supper she got out her book and learned me about Moses andthe Bulrushers, and I was in a sweat to find out all about him; but byand by she let it out that Moses had been dead a considerable longtime; so then I didn't care no more about him, because I don't take nostock in dead people.Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. Butshe wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and Imust try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people.They get down on a thing when they don't know nothing about it.Here she was a-bothering about Moses, which was no kin to her, andno use to anybody, being gone, you see, yet finding a power of faultwith me for doing a thing that had some good in it. And she tooksnuff, too; of course that was all right, because she done it herself.Her sister, Miss Watson, a tolerable slim old maid, with goggles on,had just come to live with her, and took a set at me now with aspelling-book. She worked me middling hard for about an hour, andthen the widow made her ease up. I couldn't stood it much longer.Then for an hour it was deadly dull, and I was fidgety. Miss Watsonwould say, "Don't put your feet up there, Huckleberry;" and "Don'tscrunch up like that, Huckleberry-set up straight;" and pretty soonshe would say, "Don't gap and stretch like that, Huckleberry-whydon't you try to behave?" Then she told me all about the bad place,and I said I wished I was there. She got mad then, but I didn't meanno harm. All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was achange, I warn't particular. She said it was wicked to say what I said;said she wouldn't say it for the whole world; she was going to live soas to go to the good place.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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Author: Mark Twain

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 266

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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (often shortened to Huck Finn) is a novel written by American humorist Mark Twain. It is commonly used and accounted as one of the first Great American Novels. It is also one of the first major American novels written using Local Color Regionalism, or vernacular, told in the first person by the eponymous Huckleberry "Huck" Finn, best friend of Tom Sawyer and hero of three other Mark Twain books.

The Mysterious Stranger and Other Stories

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Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 46

View: 744

The Mysterious Stranger and Other Stories By Mark Twain The Mysterious Stranger, published posthumously in 1916 and belonging to Twain's "dark" period, belies the popular image of the affable American humorist. At the time this work was written, Twain had suffered a series of painful physical, economic, and emotional losses. In this antireligious tale, he denies the existence of a benign Providence, a soul, an afterlife, and even reality itself. As the Stranger in the story asserts, "nothing exists; all is a dream." We are delighted to publish this classic book as part of our extensive Classic Library collection. Many of the books in our collection have been out of print for decades, and therefore have not been accessible to the general public. The aim of our publishing program is to facilitate rapid access to this vast reservoir of literature, and our view is that this is a significant literary work, which deserves to be brought back into print after many decades. The contents of the vast majority of titles in the Classic Library have been scanned from the original works. To ensure a high quality product, each title has been meticulously hand curated by our staff. Our philosophy has been guided by a desire to provide the reader with a book that is as close as possible to ownership of the original work. We hope that you will enjoy this wonderful classic work, and that for you it becomes an enriching experience.

Tom and Huck's Howling Adventure

The Further Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

Author: Tim Champlin

Publisher: Wheeler Publishing, Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 354

View: 859

When modern-day thirteen-year-old Zane wakes from a coma in 1849 Missouri, his plans for adventure in Indian Territory with Tom Sawyer, Huckleberry Finn, and Jim are halted by the kidnapping of Becky Thatcher.

The $30,000 Bequest and Other Short Stories: Large Print

Author: Mark Twain

Publisher: Independently Published

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 276

View: 515

Bringing together 38 tales and sketches, The $30,000 Bequest provides a rare long view of Twain's work, covering virtually his entire career, from "Advice to Young Girls" (a spoof that appeared in 1865, just months before he achieved national acclaim for his "Jumping Frog" tale), to the title story, written in 1904. Whether he is probing the dynamics of a marriage in "The ...

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Author: Edited By S.E. Paces

Publisher: S. Chand Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page:

View: 105

Great Stories in Easy English

Mark Twain's Adventures of Tom Sawyer

The NewSouth Edition

Author: Alan Gribben

Publisher: NewSouth Books

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 186

View: 231

In a radical departure from standard editions, the coming-of-age story that introduces Mark Twain’s two most enduring literary characters—Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn—is published here with its disturbing racial labels translated as “slave” and “Indian.” Everything else is completely intact in a novel that Twain termed a “hymn to boyhood.” Tom and Huck fish and swim in the Mississippi River, search for buried treasure, and hide in a haunted house. Around the edges of this idyllic boy-life, however, loom dangerous events in the fictional village of St. Petersburg: Tom and Huck witness a midnight murder in a graveyard, the killer escapes from the courtroom while Tom is testifying, and two sinister villains plot robbery and revenge against a wealthy widow. Readers can follow the boys’ adventures without confronting the dozens of racial slurs that are available in other editions of the book. The editor supplies a historical and literary introduction as well as a guide to Twain’s satirical targets.