Lady Sings the Blues

Author: Billie Holiday

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 192

View: 963

"I've been told that no one sings the word 'hunger' like I do. Or the word 'love'." Lady Sings the Blues is the inimitable autobiography of one of the greatest icons of the twentieth century. Born to a single mother in 1915 Baltimore, Billie Holiday had her first run-in with the law at aged 13. But Billie Holiday is no victim. Her memoir tells the story of her life spent in jazz, smoky Harlem clubs and packed-out concert halls, her love affairs, her wildly creative friends, her struggles with addiction and her adventures in love. Billie Holiday is a wise and aphoristic guide to the story of her unforgettable life.

Lady Sings the Blues [book & CD]

Author: Billie Holiday

Publisher: Three Rivers Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 227

View: 651

Billie Holiday describes her early childhood in an East Baltimore ghetto, her career as an internationally-acclaimed jazz vocalist, and her years spent battling a drug habit.

Billie Holiday

Lady Sings the Blues

Author: Billie Holiday

Publisher: Hal Leonard Publishing Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Blues (Music)

Page: 67

View: 265

(Piano/Vocal/Guitar Artist Songbook). 18 hits featuring 'The Man I Love, ' 'Lover, Come Back to Me' and 'Body and Soul.'

Lady Sings the Blues

Screenplay

Author: Sidney J. Furie

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Feature films

Page: 192

View: 569

Lady Sings the Blues

Brimstone Lords MC

Author: Sarah Zolton Arthur

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 378

View: 361

Elise Manning was called a traitor. A bitch. And a whore. Logan had been her first love, but first loves are no match for the pain of infidelity and drug abuse. With no one else to turn to Elise sought comfort in the arms of his cousin, the town's "golden boy," Beau Hollister. Until Logan took his own life, and Elise found herself blamed for his death. As if she'd been the unfaithful one? Hated by the people of Thornbriar, and abandoned by Beau, Elise had no choice but to leave, to try and rebuild what was left of her miserable life. Five years later finds Elise back, and it's not a happy reunion. First stop, a bar and a stiff drink. Elise's run-in with the hot, tatted, joke cracking bartender sparks a connection she hasn't felt in years. But this man who seems oddly familiar, has secrets. He's a biker. As a child, she'd had a run-in with bikers. They're criminals. So why does he pique her interest? Mark, or Bossman, as his MC brothers call him, is kind. Sexy. They have a chemistry Elise can't deny, though he's doesn't fit the plan. Get in. Bury her father. Get out. Despite the danger, Elise finds herself falling for him. But he still hides something. Something bigger than motorcycle clubs. Enter Houdini, a master of trickery. The rival biker has had it out for Bossman for years... until he sets his sights on Elise. She's the game changer, the one who will lead him to victory over his enemy. Use Elise to bring Bossman low, the plan is perfection, and he will do whatever it takes to win... even if to use her, means to destroy her. Packed with action, mystery, and heat, Lady Sings the Blues is a thrilling romantic suspense novel full of twists, turns, and surprises. Readers will enjoy this shocking love story featuring hot bikers and a strong heroine by author Sarah Zolton Arthur.

Preacher Woman Sings the Blues

The Autobiographies of Nineteenth-century African American Evangelists

Author: Richard J. Douglass-Chin

Publisher: University of Missouri Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 240

View: 342

Hollywood Shot by Shot

Alcoholism in American Cinema

Author: Norman K. Denzin

Publisher: Transaction Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 292

View: 806

To what extent have Hollywood feature films shaped the meanings that Americans attach to alcoholics, their families, and the alcoholic condition? To what extent has the mass culture of the movie industry itself been conceptually shaped by a broad, external societal discourse? Norman Denzin brings to his life-long study of alcoholism a searching interest in how cultural texts signify and lend themselves to interpretation within a social nexus. Both historical and diachronic in his approach, Denzin identifies five periods in the alcoholism films made between 1932 and the end of the 1980s, and offers a detailed critical reading of thirty-seven films produced during these six decades. "Professor Denzin has produced a searching and provocative interpretation of more than a half-century of Hollywood's social and personal construction of the problem drinker in America. Readable by both lay persons and specialists, Denzin's book provides us with the most comprehensive understanding of this topic to date."--Stanford M. Lyman, Robert J. Morrow Eminent Scholar in Social Science, Florida Atlantic University "An eminent sociologist and leading authority on alcoholism, Denzin also writes skillfully about films as films and is comfortable with postmodern interpretive theoryà a genuinely interdisciplinary work of the first order." --Robert L. Carringer, author, The Making of Citizen Kane "Denzin has gone on an exhaustive bar-crawl through hundreds of movies, returning with evidence that the film about drinking is a genre of its own. He writes from sound knowledge about alcoholism--which, unlike other diseases, is frequently viewed with bittersweet romanticism."--Roger Ebert Norman K. Denzin is professor of sociology, cinema studies, and interpretive theory at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He was awarded the George Herbert Mead Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction. He is the author of several books, including Screening Race: Hollywood and a Cinema of Racial Violence, The Recovering Alcoholic, Interpretive Ethnography, Images of Postmodernism: Social Theory and Contemporary Cinema, and Interpretive Interactionism.

Billie Holiday

Wishing On The Moon

Author: Donald Clarke

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Music

Page: 508

View: 598

Certainly no singer has been more mythologized and more misunderstood than Billie Holiday, who helped to create much of the mystique herself with her autobiography, Lady Sings the Blues. "Now, finally, we have a definitive biography," said Booklist of Donald Clarke's Billie Holiday, "by a deeply compassionate, respectful, and open-minded biographer [whose] portrait embraces every facet of Holiday's paradoxical nature, from her fierceness to her vulnerability, her childlikeness to her innate elegance and amazing strength." Clarke was given unrivaled access to a treasure trove of interviews from the 1970s—interviews with those who knew Lady Day from her childhood in the streets and good-time houses of Baltimore through the early days of success in New York and into the years of fame, right up to her tragic decline and death at the age of forty-four. Clarke uses these interviews to separate fact from fiction and, in the words of the Seattle Times, "finally sets us straight. . .evoking her world in all its anguish, triumph, force and irony." Newsday called this "a thoroughly riveting account of Holiday and her milieu." The New York Times raved that it "may be the most thoroughly valuable of the many books on Holiday," and Helen Oakley Dance in JazzTimes said, "We should probably have to wait a long time for another life of Billie Holiday to supersede Donald Clarke's achievement."