Avant-garde Performance

Author: Günter Berghaus

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 352

View: 575

How did the concept of the avant-garde come into existence? How did it impact on the performing arts? How did the avant-garde challenge the artistic establishment and avoid the pull of commercial theatre, gallery and concert-hall circuits? How did performance artists respond to new technological developments? Placing key figures and performances in their historical, social and aesthetic context, Günter Berghaus offers an accessible introduction to post-war avant-garde performance. Written in a clear, engaging style, and supported by text boxes and illustrations throughout, this volume explains the complex ideas behind avant-garde art and evocatively brings to life the work of some of its most influential performance artists. Covering hot topics such as multi-media and body art performances, this text is essential reading for students of theatre studies and performance.

Virtual Art

From Illusion to Immersion

Author: Oliver Grau

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 416

View: 639

Although many people view virtual reality as a modern phenomenon, it has its foundations in a history of immersive images. The search for illusionary visual space can be traced back to antiquity. This text shows how virtual art fits into the art history of illusion and immersion.

The Art of the Body

Antiquity and its Legacy

Author: Michael Squire

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 828

The art of the human body is arguably the most important and wide-ranging legacy bequeathed to us by Classical antiquity. Not only has it directed the course of western image-making, it has shaped our collective cultural imaginary - as ideal, antitype, and point of departure. This book is the first concerted attempt to grapple with that legacy: it explores the complex relationship between Graeco-Roman images of the body and subsequent western engagements with them, from the Byzantine icon to Venice Beach (and back again). Instead of approaching his material chronologically, Michael Squire faces up to its inherent modernity. Writing in a lively and accessible style, and supplementing his text with a rich array of pictures, he shows how Graeco-Roman images inhabit our world as if they were our own. The Art of the Body offers a series of comparative and thematic accounts, demonstrating the range of cultural ideas and anxieties that were explored through the figure of the body both in antiquity and in the various cultural landscapes that came afterwards. If we only strip down our aesthetic investment in the corpus of Graeco-Roman imagery, Squire argues, this material can shed light on both ancient and modern thinking. The result is a stimulating process of mutual illumination - and an exhilarating new approach to Classical art history.

Body Dialectics in the Age of Goethe

Author: Marianne Henn

Publisher: Rodopi

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 437

View: 435

In opposition to an essentialist conceptualization, the social construct of the human body in literature can be analyzed and described by means of effective methodologies that are based on Discourse Theory, Theory of Cultural Transmission and Ecology, System Theory, and Media Theory. In this perspective, the body is perceived as a complex arrangement of substantiation, substitution, and omission depending on demands, expectations, and prohibitions of the dominant discourse network. The term Body-Dialectics stands for the attempt to decipher – and for a moment freeze – the web of such discursive arrangements that constitute the fictitious notion of the body in the framework of a specific historic environment, here in the Age of Goethe.

Art and Obscenity

Author: Kerstin Mey

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 192

View: 389

Explicit material is more widely available in the internet age than ever before, yet the concept of ‘obscenity’ remains as difficult to pin down as it is to approach without bias: notions of what is ‘obscene’ shift with societies’ shifting mores, and our responses to explicit or disturbing material can be highly subjective. In this intelligent and sensitive book, Kerstin Mey grapples with the work of twentieth-century artists practising at the edges of acceptability, from Hans Bellmer through to Nobuyoshi Araki, from Robert Mapplethorpe to Annie Sprinkle, and from Hermann Nitsch to Paul McCarthy. Mey refuses sweeping statements and ‘knee-jerk’ responses, arguing with dexterity that some works, regardless of their ‘high art’ context, remain deeply problematic, whilst others are both groundbreaking and liberating.