Kew's Teas, Tonics and Tipples

Inspiring Botanical Drinks to Excite Your Tastebuds

Author: Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

Publisher: Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 120

View: 586

Kew's Teas, Tonics and Tipples is a celebration of the huge diversity of flavour, colour and fragrance plants bring to the drinks we consume. Throughout the book are recipes from Kew staff, from curators, to gardeners and botanists, as well as drinks inspired by the great plant hunters and their exotic adventures. With over 60 recipes accompanied with beatiful botanic art from Kew's archives.

The Gardener's Companion to Medicinal Plants

Author: Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

Publisher: Frances Lincoln

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 224

View: 291

The Gardener's Companion to Medicinal Plants is a beautifully illustrated giftable gardening reference book, which combines exquisite botanical illustrations with practical self-help projects. Every day sees a discovery in the press about the new uses of plants, and it's certain that most of our most important drugs are derived from plants. From willow (used to procure aspirin) to periwinkle (used in chemotherapy to treat lymphoma) many common garden plants have provided cures in modern medicine. In this book readers can discover more than 200 life-saving plants and 25 home-grown remedies to make themselves. Each home cure is described and illustrated with step-by-step photographs to show how you can be a gardener and heal yourself.

The Significance of Gardening in British India

Author: Charles Carlton

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Gardening

Page: 107

View: 724

This book is a multi-faceted study of the role of gardening in British India with several accompanying illustrations- it is a study of imperial history, environmental history, cultural history and women's history. First, as a study in imperial history that shows how the British used landscape architecture to convey images of power to both themselves and the Indians. Second, as a study in environmental history, this book traces the way in which the British established a whole series of Botanical gardens centered at Kew in London. Tea and cincinchona (an antidote for malaria) were imported to be grown in India, while opium was forcibly exported to China. Without cincinchona, imperialism would have been medically impossible and without tea or opium, imperialism would have not been immensely profitable. Third, this is a study in cultural history, exploring how the British tried to modify India by creating their own cultural retreat - the hill station. Finally, this book deals with women's history. Gardening became a means by which English women occupied themselves, creating a little England to alleviate the intense homesickness.