Justyna's Narrative

Author: Draenger Gusta Davidson

Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 716

A memoir written in prison

Who Will Write Our History?

Rediscovering a Hidden Archive from the Warsaw Ghetto

Author: Samuel D. Kassow

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 576

View: 224

In 1940, in the Jewish ghetto of Nazi-occupied Warsaw, the Polish historian Emanuel Ringelblum established a clandestine scholarly organization called the Oyneg Shabes to record the experiences of the ghetto's inhabitants. For three years, members of the Oyneb Shabes worked in secret to chronicle the lives of hundereds of thousands as they suffered starvation, disease, and deportation by the Nazis. Shortly before the Warsaw ghetto was emptied and razed in 1943, the Oyneg Shabes buried thousands of documents from this massive archive in milk cans and tin boxes, ensuring that the voice and culture of a doomed people would outlast the efforts of their enemies to silence them. Impeccably researched and thoroughly compelling, Samuel D. Kassow's Who Will Write Our History? tells the tragic story of Ringelblum and his heroic determination to use historical scholarship to preserve the memory of a threatened people.

People of the Holocaust

Author: Linda Schmittroth

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)

Page: 508

View: 590

Profiles sixty women and men who were caught up in the Holocaust, including Nazi perpetrators and their victims, world leaders and policy makers, and those who showed their humanity and courage by resiting Hitler's reign of genocidal terror.

Translation Review

Annotated books received supplement

Author:

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Category: English imprints

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View: 426

Terry Pratchett's Narrative Worlds

From Giant Turtles to Small Gods

Author: Marion Rana

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 575

This book highlights the multi-dimensionality of the work of British fantasy writer and Discworld creator Terry Pratchett. Taking into account content, political commentary, and literary technique, it explores the impact of Pratchett's work on fantasy writing and genre conventions.With chapters on gender, multiculturalism, secularism, education, and relativism, Section One focuses on different characters’ situatedness within Pratchett’s novels and what this may tell us about the direction of his social, religious and political criticism. Section Two discusses the aesthetic form that this criticism takes, and analyses the post- and meta-modern aspects of Pratchett’s writing, his use of humour, and genre adaptations and deconstructions. This is the ideal collection for any literary and cultural studies scholar, researcher or student interested in fantasy and popular culture in general, and in Terry Pratchett in particular.

Boundary

Author: Zofia Nalkowska

Publisher: Northern Illinois University Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 272

View: 595

Available for the first time in English, Zofia Nalkowska's Boundary was originally published as Granica in Poland in 1935. The modernist novel was widely discussed upon its publication and praised for its psychological realism and stylistic and compositional artistry. Over the years, it has been translated into several languages and made into a feature film, and remains a standard text in the Polish secondary school curriculum. Nalkowska was a pioneer of feminist fiction in Central Europe. Her observation of inequality in the treatment of men and women is at the heart of Boundary, which explores a transgressive love affair and its repercussions. She perceived that men--especially of the upper and middle classes--felt free to have sexual relations with lower class women, whereas it was not socially acceptable for women of any class to have sexual relations outside of marriage, or even admit to enjoying sex. This meant that working class women were seduced and then abandoned when they became pregnant, leaving them with the stigma of illegitimate children and the problem of finding work. Meanwhile, the higher class wives found themselves betrayed. While Boundary can be interpreted as a novel about power and its abuses, it contains several dimensions--philosophical, emotional, existential, moral--that render it a consummate piece of social criticism. An elegantly composed work of imaginative fiction, it does not preach or offer solutions. Ursula Phillips's excellent translation will interest readers of early twentieth century novels and scholars and students of Polish literature, feminist studies, and European modernism.

South Atlantic Review

The Publication of the South Atlantic Modern Language Association

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Category: Philology, Modern

Page:

View: 474

NWSA Journal

A Publication of the National Women's Studies Association

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ISBN:

Category: Electronic journals

Page:

View: 507

AB Bookman's Weekly

For the Specialist Book World

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Category: Antiquarian booksellers

Page:

View: 180

Polish National Cinema

Author: Marek Haltof

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 304

View: 348

In the years since World War 2, Poland has developed one of Europe's most distinguished film cultures. This is a comprehensive study of Polish cinema from the end of the 19th century to the present.

The Lullaby of Polish Girls

A Novel

Author: Dagmara Dominczyk

Publisher: Spiegel & Grau

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 256

View: 144

Includes an interview featuring Dagmara Dominczyk and Adriana Trigiani A vibrant, engaging debut novel that follows the friendship of three women from their youthful days in Poland to their complicated, not-quite-successful adult lives Because of her father’s role in the Solidarity movement, Anna and her parents immigrate to the United States in the 1980s as political refugees from Poland. They settle in Brooklyn among immigrants of every stripe, yet Anna never quite feels that she belongs. But then, the summer she turns twelve, she is sent back to Poland to visit her grandmother, and suddenly she experiences the shock of recognition. In her family’s hometown of Kielce, Anna develops intense friendships with two local girls—brash and beautiful Justyna and desperately awkward Kamila—and their bond is renewed every summer when Anna returns. The Lullaby of Polish Girls follows these three best friends from their early teenage years on the lookout for boys in Kielce—a town so rough its citizens are called “the switchblades”—to the loss of innocence that wrecks them, and the stunning murder that reaches across oceans to bring them back together after they’ve grown and long since left home. Dagmara Dominczyk’s assured narrative flashes from the wild summers of the girls’ youth to their years of self-discovery in New York and Europe. Her writing is full of grit and guts, and her descriptions of the emotional experiences of her characters resonate with honesty. The Lullaby of Polish Girls captures the passion and drama of friendship, the immigrant’s yearning to be known, and the exquisite and wistful transformation of young women coming of age. Praise for The Lullaby of Polish Girls “A coming-of-age tale of three young Polish women [that is] brimming with teary epiphanies, betrayal and love, as well as the grit of both New York and Kielce. [It’s] Girls with a Polish accent.”—The New York Times “The Lullaby of Polish Girls will make you swoon. Dagmara Dominczyk has written a glorious debut novel inspired by her own emigration from Poland to Brooklyn with depth, intensity, humor, and grace.”—Adriana Trigiani “An ennui-stricken actress returns to the old country—and to the friends of her youth—in Dagmara Dominczyk’s The Lullaby of Polish Girls, in which solidarity is all about summer evenings under the stars with a vodka bottle and a radio playing ‘Forever Young.’ ”—Vogue “Compelling . . . an original portrait of friendship and identity . . . Dominczyk uses a fresh, confident style.”—People “In this arresting debut novel, Polish American film and TV actress Dominczyk pays homage to her native city of Kielce while capturing the joys, insecurities, and struggles of three girlfriends coming of age. Spanning thirteen years, Dominczyk’s absorbing story is a triptych of tsknota (Polish for a kind of yearning) and a profound desire for acceptance, freedom, and home.”—Booklist (starred review) “The Lullaby of Polish Girls is sexy and sensitive, with a raw, openhearted center. Dominczyk’s love for her complicated characters is apparent from the first page to the last, and by the novel’s end the reader cares for them just as deeply.”—Emma Straub Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader's Circle for author chats and more.