Justice before Reconciliation

Negotiating a ‘New Normal’ in Post-riot Mumbai and Ahmedabad

Author: Dipankar Gupta

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 863

The book explores how Muslims in Mumbai and Ahmedabad coped with the aftermath of the violence directed against them in 1993 and 2002 respectively, and how they responded to the ethnic carnages of which they were the victims, highlighting the importance of the context and the history of the place where such violence occurred. Unlike other studies on ethnic violence which have a short-term focus, in dealing with its immediate aftermath, this book examines what happens to the victims over time and how they negotiate a ‘new normal’ and get on with their lives. Using empirical material based on field work in Mumbai and Ahmedabad, the book shows that while poverty, education and employment remain important elements in the recovery process, the most crucial issue is that of justice and the need to reclaim citizenship. A significant section of the book is devoted to the relationship between Muslim faith-based organisations and the victims of ethnic violence.

Margins of Citizenship

Muslim Experiences in Urban India

Author: Anasua Chatterjee

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: HISTORY

Page: 202

View: 918

Part of the ‘Religion and Citizenship’ series, this book is an ethnographic study of marginality of Muslims in urban India. It explores the realities and consequences of socio-spatial segregation faced by Muslim communities and the various ways in which they negotiate it in the course of their everyday lives. By narrating lived experiences of ordinary Muslims, the author attempts to construct their identities as citizens and subjects. What emerges is a highly variegated picture of a group (otherwise viewed as monolithic) that resides in very close quarters, more as a result of compulsion than choice, despite wide differences across language, ethnicity, sect and social class. The book also looks into the potential outcomes that socio-spatial segregation spelt on communal lines hold for the future of the urban landscape in South Asia. Rich in ethnographic data and accessible in its approach, this book will be useful for scholars and researchers of sociology, social anthropology, human geography, political sociology, urban studies, and political science.

Questioning the ‘Muslim Woman’

Identity and Insecurity in an Urban Indian Locality

Author: Nida Kirmani

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 432

The marginalisation of Muslims in India has recently been the subject of heated public debate. In these discussions, however, Muslim women are often either overlooked or treated as a homogenous group with a common set of interests. Focusing on the narratives of women living in a predominantly Muslim colony in South Delhi, this book attempts to demonstrate the complexity of their lives and the multiple levels of insecurity they face. Unlike other studies on Indian Muslims that focus on Islam as a defining factor, this book highlights the ways in which religious identity intersects with other identities including class/status, regional affiliation and gender. The author also sheds light on the impact of such events as the Babri Masjid demolition in 1992 and the subsequent riots, the Gujarat communal carnage in 2002, and the anti-Sikh violence in New Delhi in 1984, along with the rise of Hindutva, and growing Islamophobia experienced worldwide in the post-9/11 period — on the articulation of identities at the local level and increasing religion-based spatial segregation in Indian cities. The study highlights how these incidents combine in different ways to increase the sense of marginalisation experienced by Muslims at the level of the locality. Understanding the need to look beyond preconceived religious categories, this book will serve as essential reading for those interested in sociology, anthropology, gender, religious and urban studies, as well as policymakers and organisations concerned with issues related to religious minorities in India.