Journal of Roman Pottery Studies Volume 16

Author: Steven Willis

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 200

View: 107

The Journal of Roman Pottery Studies continues to present a cross-section of recent research not just from the UK but also Europe. Volume 16 carries papers on a variety of subjects from Britain and the Continent, ranging from papers dealing with production sites to those looking at the distribution of types. There are case studies on kiln vessels from Essex, pottery production in Roman Cologne, excavations at Toulouse, as well as an examination of transport routes of samian ware to Britain. Also included are an editorial, obituaries and book reviews.

Journal of Roman Pottery Studies Volume 9

The Roman Pottery Kilns at Rossington Bridge Excavations 1956-1961

Author: P. C. Buckland

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 82

View: 957

Report on the excavations of eight Roman pottery kilns at Rossington Bridge, Lincolnshire Volume Nine of Journal of Roman Pottery Studies, published by Oxbow Books for the Study Group for Romano- British Pottery contains the long-awaited Rossington Bridge report. Rossington Bridge lies next to the Roman road between Doncaster and Lincoln. Excavations between 1956-1961 discovered eight pottery kilns, a site of considerable significance. The kilns and material from the waster heaps excavated lie on a site with at least fifteen other unexcavated kilns and ancillary structures lying either side of the Roman road. The bulk of the finds clearly belong to the main period of activity on the site during the mid-2nd century when the mortarium potter Sarrius and his associates were involved in the production of mortaria, 'parisian' fine wares, black-burnished and grey wares intended for the military markets on the Northern frontier.

Journal of Roman Pottery Studies Volume 19

Author: Steven Willis

Publisher: Oxbow Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 160

View: 585

The main focus of this volume is upon pottery production sites. The major contribution comprises 'Excavations of Roman pottery kiln sites in Cantley Parish, South Yorkshire, 1956-1975' by Paul Buckland and the late John Magilton. Other contributions publish the well-preserved kiln complex and products at Lavenham, Suffolk (Andrew Newton, Andrew Peachey, et al.), mortaria and color-coated production at Newport, Lincoln (Ian Rowlandson and Hugh Fiske), a large typology of Roman pottery from Old Station Yard, York (Rob Perrin), an exploration of actions applied to pottery placed in graves across Kent (Martha Carter), and a review article considering the pottery assemblage from the Saxon Shore Fort at Oudenburg, Belgium, excavated by Sofie Vanhoutte.

A Historical Guide to Roman York

Author: Paul Chrystal

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 658

Considering that York was always an important Roman city there are few books available that are devoted specifically to the Roman occupation, even though it lasted for over 300 years and played a significant role in the politics and military activity of Roman Britain and the Roman Empire throughout that period. The few books that there are tend to describe the Roman era and its events in date by date order with little attention paid either to why things happened as they did or to the consequences of these actions and developments. This book is different in that it gives context to what happened here in the light of developments in Roman Britain generally and in the wider Roman Empire; the author digs below the surface and gets behind the scenes to shed light on the political, social and military history of Roman York (Eboracum), explaining, for example, why Julius Caesar invaded, what indeed was really behind the Claudian invasion, why was York developed as a military fortress, why as one of Roman Britain’s capitals? Why did the emperors Hadrian and Severus visit the fortress? You will also discover how and why Constantine accepted and projected Christianity from here, York’s role in the endless coups and revolts besetting the province, the headless gladiators and wonderful mosaics discovered here and why the Romans finally left York and Roman Britain to its own defence. These intriguing historical events are brought to life by reference to the latest local archaeological and epigraphical evidence, to current research and to evolving theories relating to the city’s Roman treasures, of which can be seen in the Yorkshire Museum in York, or in situ.

People and Spaces in Roman Military Bases

Author: Penelope M. Allison

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 528

View: 732

This study uses artefact distribution analyses to investigate the activities that took place inside early Roman imperial military bases. Focusing especially on non-combat activities, it explores the lives of families and other support personnel who are widely assumed to have inhabited civilian settlements outside the fortification walls. Spatial analyses, in GIS-type environments, are used to develop fresh perspectives on the range of people who lived within the walls of these military establishments, the various industrial, commercial, domestic and leisure activities in which they and combat personnel were involved, and the socio-spatial organisation of these activities and these establishments. The book includes examples of both legionary fortresses and auxiliary forts from the German provinces to demonstrate that more material-cultural approaches to the artefact assemblages from these sites give greater insights into how these military communities operated and demonstrate the problems of ascribing functions to buildings without investigating the full material record.

Gulf in World History

Arabian, Persian and Global Connections

Author: Allen James Fromherz

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 106

Analyses of Ranciere's philosophy and its potential for understanding the conversation between contemporary politics and art cinema

Clash of Cultures?

The Romano-British Period in the West Midlands

Author: Roger White

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 350

View: 835

The general perception of the west midlands region in the Roman period is that it was a backwater compared to the militarized frontier zone of the north, or the south of Britain where Roman culture took root early – in cities like Colchester, London ,and St Albans – and lingered late at cities like Cirencester and Bath with their rich, late Roman villa culture. The west midlands region captures the transition between these two areas of the ‘military’ north and ‘civilized’ south. Where it differed, and why, are important questions in understanding the regional diversity of Roman Britain. They are addressed by this volume which details the archaeology of the Roman period for each of the modern counties of the region, written by local experts who are or have been responsible for the management and exploration of their respective counties. These are placed alongside more thematic takes on elements of Roman culture, including the Roman Army, pottery, coins and religion. Lastly, an overview is taken of the important transitional period of the fifth and sixth centuries. Each paper provides both a developed review of the existing state of knowledge and understanding of the key characteristics of the subject area and details a set of research objectives for the future, immediate and long-term, that will contribute to our evolving understanding of Roman Britain. This is the third volume in a series – The Making of the West Midlands – that explores the archaeology of the English west midlands region from the Lower Palaeolithic onwards.

TRAC 2008

Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference which Took Place at The University of Amsterdam, 4-6 March 2008

Author: Mark Driessen

Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 243

Many papers were given during the annual conference, covering the breadth and length of the Roman world. This volume contains a selection of the papers from all of the sessions.