California Prehistory

Colonization, Culture, and Complexity

Author: Terry L. Jones

Publisher: Rowman Altamira

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 408

View: 890

Reader of original synthesizing articles for introductory courses on archaeology and native peoples of California.

The Oxford Companion to Archaeology

Author: Brian M. Fagan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 844

View: 841

Features articles written by archaeology scholars on such topics as bog bodies, underwater archaeology, the Pyramids of Giza, and the Valley of the Kings

The Way the Wind Blows

Climate Change, History, and Human Action

Author: Roderick J. McIntosh

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 448

View: 369

Scientists and policymakers are beginning to understand in ever-increasing detail that environmental problems cannot be understood solely through the biophysical sciences. Environmental issues are fundamentally human issues and must be set in the context of social, political, cultural, and economic knowledge. The need both to understand how human beings in the past responded to climatic and other environmental changes and to synthesize the implications of these historical patterns for present-day sustainability spurred a conference of the world's leading scholars on the topic. The Way the Wind Blows is the rich result of that conference. Articles discuss the dynamics of climate, human perceptions of and responses to the environment, and issues of sustainability and resiliency. These themes are illustrated through discussions of human societies around the world and throughout history.

The Lifeways of Hunter-Gatherers

The Foraging Spectrum

Author: Robert L. Kelly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page:

View: 955

In this book, Robert L. Kelly challenges the preconceptions that hunter-gatherers were Paleolithic relics living in a raw state of nature, instead crafting a position that emphasizes their diversity, and downplays attempts to model the original foraging lifeway or to use foragers to depict human nature stripped to its core. Kelly reviews the anthropological literature for variation among living foragers in terms of diet, mobility, sharing, land tenure, technology, exchange, male-female relations, division of labor, marriage, descent and political organization. Using the paradigm of human behavioral ecology, he analyzes the diversity in these areas and seeks to explain rather than explain away variability, and argues for an approach to prehistory that uses archaeological data to test theory rather than one that uses ethnographic analogy to reconstruct the past.

Daily Life during the California Gold Rush

Author: Thomas . Maxwell-Long

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 202

View: 262

This comprehensive narrative history of the California Gold Rush describes daily life during this historic period, documenting its wide-reaching effects and examining the significant individuals and organizations of the time. • Contains excerpts from California Gold Rush diaries and California Gold Rush era publications • Provides a chronology of the events leading up to the Gold Rush, the event itself, and the greater outgrowth of historical change afterwards • Includes maps distinguishing the location of the mining towns during the California Gold Rush as well as provocative vintage images from the Gold Rush era • An extensive bibliography provides primary and secondary sources on the Gold Rush • A comprehensive glossary defines Gold Rush terms

Hearing the voices of GRT communities

Inclusive community development

Author: Ryder, Andrew

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 206

Over the past decade, interest in Gypsies, Roma and Travellers (GRT) has risen up the political and media agendas, but they remain relatively unknown. This topical book is the first to chart the history and contemporary developments in GRT community activism, and the community and voluntary organisations and coalitions which support it. Underpinned by radical community development and equality theories, it describes the communities' struggle for rights against a backdrop of intense intersectional discrimination across Europe, and critiques the ambivalent role of community development in fostering these campaigns. Much of it co-written by community activists, it is a vehicle for otherwise marginalised voices, and an essential resource and inspiration for practitioners, lecturers, researchers and members of GRT communities.

Hunter-gatherer Archaeology as Historical Process

Author: Kenneth E. Sassaman

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 341

View: 778

Papers from a seminar held in 2008 at the Amerind Foundation in Dragoon, Ariz.

Human Expeditions

Inspired by Bruce Trigger

Author: Stephen Chrisomalis

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 316

View: 789

In its 2007 obituary of Bruce Trigger (1937–2006), the Times of London referred to the Canadian anthropologist and archaeologist as “Canada’s leading prehistorian” and “one of the most influential archaeologists of his time.” Trained at Yale University and a faculty member at McGill University for more than forty years, he was best known for his History of Archaeological Thought, which the Times called “monumental.” Trigger inspired scholars all over the world through his questioning of assumptions and his engagement with social and political causes. Human Expeditions pays tribute to Trigger’s immense legacy by bringing together cutting edge work from internationally recognized and emerging researchers inspired by his example. Covering the length and breadth of Trigger’s wide-ranging interests – from Egyptology to the history of archaeological theory to North American aboriginal cultures – this volume highlights the diversity of his academic work and the magnitude of his impact in many different areas of scholarship.

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology

Examining Technology Through Production and Use

Author: Jeffrey R. Ferguson

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 609

Designing Experimental Research in Archaeology is a guide for the design of archaeological experiments for both students and scholars. Experimental archaeology provides a unique opportunity to corroborate conclusions with multiple trials of repeatable experiments and can provide data otherwise unavailable to archaeologists without damaging sites, remains, or artifacts. Each chapter addresses a particular classification of material culture-ceramics, stone tools, perishable materials, composite hunting technology, butchering practices and bone tools, and experimental zooarchaeology-detailing issues that must be considered in the development of experimental archaeology projects and discussing potential pitfalls. The experiments follow coherent and consistent research designs and procedures and are placed in a theoretical context, and contributors outline methods that will serve as a guide in future experiments. This degree of standardization is uncommon in traditional archaeological research but is essential to experimental archaeology. The field has long been in need of a guide that focuses on methodology and design. This book fills that need not only for undergraduate and graduate students but for any archaeologist looking to begin an experimental research project.