Jews and the Olympic Games

The Clash Between Sport and Politics : with a Complete Review of Jewish Olympic Medallists

Author: Paul Taylor

Publisher: ISBS

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 788

This unique book documents the history of Jewish Olympic athletes, many of whom suffered under Nazi persecution and the Holocaust, illustrating how they used sport as a mechanism for combating oppression, social prejudice and inequality. There is an unusually rich collection of stories making up the history of the Jews at the Olympic Games. This is partly due to the prodigious -- and widely underestimated -- success of Jewish athletes at the Games, but also owing to the special history of the Jewish people in the twentieth century -- first, as victims of racism in Europe and then, following the establishment of modern Israel in 1948, in the ongoing struggle for peace in the Middle East. Many of the athletes depicted here fought battles both on and off the running track. The personal drama and enduring humanity of their stories goes beyond sport and embraces politics, heroism and resilience. The Olympic Games served to combat persecution -- in sport, the best competitor always wins. On these equal terms, such political and racial interference is rendered impotent. No story so richly illustrates the interaction between sport and politics as the story of Jewish athletes and the Games. Each major event at the Games related to the Jews is covered in-depth, including: the story of the Jewish-Hungarian wrestler Kroly Krpti in Berlin, 1936; the German-Jewish high-jumper Gretel Bergmann, who was callously exploited, then discarded, by the Germans; the American sprinters, Marty Glickman and Sam Stoller; and the legendary Mark Spitz. From the first Olympics in Athens in 1896, through to the disasters and triumphs of Munich 1972 and beyond, this book, which features a list of the more than 250 Jewish medalists at the Games, is a powerful account of the conflict between sport and politics.

Jews and the Olympic Games

Sport : a Springboard for Minorities

Author: Paul Yogi Mayer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 255

View: 504

In the last century young Jews, particularly in Central Europe, found that they had the new and exhilarating opportunity to give expression to their physical talents and energy. How they and their successors grasped it is the theme of this engaging book, the fruits of the author's lifelong research and enthusiasm. Even after the Holocaust, Jews were among the outstanding Olympians, and over 400 Jewish medallists from the first modern Games in Athens in 1896 to the Sydney Millennium Games. However, this is not merely a book of record and records, names and events. Yogi Mayer has drawn on his own memories as an athlete, coach, educator and sports journalist to create a compelling, illustrated eyewitness account. He has known many of the athletes who are featured in the book and he describes their personalities, virtues, weaknesses and, in some cases, tragic fates.

Jews and the Olympic Games

The Clash Between Sport and Politics : with a Complete Review of Jewish Olympic Medallists

Author: Paul Taylor

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 326

On these equal terms, such political and racial interference is rendered impotent. No story so illustrates the interaction between sport and politics as the story of Jewish athletes and the Games." "Each major event at the Games related to the Jews is covered in depth. From the first Olympics in Athens in 1896, through to the disasters and triumphs of Munich 1972 and beyond, Jews and the Olympic Games - which features a list of the more than 250 Jewish medallists at the Games and sixteen pages of pictures of Jewish athletes - is an account of the conflict between sport and politics." -- book jacket.

From the Ghetto to the Games

Jewish Athletes in Hungary

Author: Andrew Handler

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 140

View: 296

Documents the contribution of Hungarian Jews to sporting achievements in Hungary in the 19th-20th centuries. In the 19th century the Jew's interest in sports was part of a process of Magyarization and assimilation, despite antisemitism in Hungarian society. Successful Jewish athletes continued to face discrimination, malicious remarks, etc.

The Nazi Olympics

Author: Richard D. Mandell

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 316

View: 940

This book is an expose of one of the most bizarre festivals in sport history. It provides portraits of key figures including Adolf Hitler, Jesse Owens, Leni Riefenstahl, Helen Stephens, Kee Chung Sohn, and Avery Brundage. It also conveys the charade that reinforced and mobilized the hysterical patriotism of the German masses.

Jews in the Gym

Judaism, Sports, and Athletics

Author: Leonard Jay Greenspoon

Publisher: Purdue University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 289

View: 682

For some, the connection between Jews and athletics might seem far-fetched. But in fact, as is highlighted by the fourteen chapters in this collection, Jews have been participating in -- and thinking about -- sports for more than two thousand years. The articles in this volume scan a wide chronological range: from the Hellenistic period (first century BCE) to the most recent basketball season. The range of athletes covered is equally broad: from participants in Roman-style games to wrestlers, boxers, fencers, baseball players, and basketball stars. The authors of these essays, many of whom actively participate in athletics themselves, raise a number of intriguing questions, such as: What differing attitudes toward sports have Jews exhibited across periods and cultures? Is it possible to be a "good Jew" and a "great athlete"? In what sports have Jews excelled, and why? How have Jews overcome prejudices on the part of the general populace against a Jewish presence on the field or in the ring? In what ways has Jewish participation in sports aided, or failed to aid, the perception of Jews as "good Germans," "good Hungarians," "good Americans," and so forth? This volume, which features a number of illustrations (many of them quite rare), is not only accessible to the general reader, but also contains much information of interest to the scholar in Jewish studies, American studies, and sports history.

Foiled

Hitler's Jewish Olympian : the Helene Mayer Story

Author: Milly Mogulof

Publisher: RDR Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 253

View: 186

Arguably history's most famous woman fencer, named as one of the top 100 athletes of the century by Sports Illustrated, Helene Mayer won the gold for Germany in the 1928 Berlin Olympics. Eight years later, with America poised to boycott the 1936 Berlin Olympics over anti-Semitism, the Nazis brought Mayer home from self-imposed exile in California to be the token Jew on their team. This marvelous book is the story of a beautiful and talented young woman who tries to win back her citizenship by fencing for the Third Reich. The thought-provoking saga of the central figure in the 20th century's most dramatic sports controversy.

The Jews of Windsor, 1790-1990

A Historical Chronicle

Author: Jonathan V. Plaut

Publisher: Dundurn

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 318

Beginning with the first Jewish settler, Moses David, the important role that Windsor Jews played in the development of Ontario’s south is mirrored in this 200-year chronicle. the founding pioneer families transformed their Eastern European shtetl into a North American settlement; many individuals were involved in establishing synagogues, schools, and an organized communal structure in spite of divergent religious, political, and economic interests. Modernity and the growing influences of Zionism and Conservative/Reform Judaism challenged the traditional and leftist leanings of the community’s founders. From the outset, Jews were represented in city council, actively involved in communal organizations, and appointed to judicial posts. While its Jewish population was small, Windsor boasted Canada’s first Jewish Cabinet members, provincially and federally, in David Croll and Herb Gray. As the new millennium approached, jews faced shrinking numbers, forcing major consolidations in order to ensure their survival.

More than Just Games

Canada and the 1936 Olympics

Author: Richard Menkis

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 340

Held in Germany, the 1936 Olympic Games sparked international controversy. Should athletes and nations boycott the games to protest the Nazi regime? More Than Just Games is the history of Canada's involvement in the 1936 Olympics. It is the story of the Canadian Olympic officials and promoters who were convinced that national unity and pride demanded that Canadian athletes compete in the Olympics without regard for politics. It is the story of those Canadian athletes, mostly young and far more focused on sport than politics, who were eager to make family, friends, and country proud of their efforts on Canada's behalf. And, finally, it is the story of those Canadians who led an unsuccessful campaign to boycott the Olympics and deny Nazi Germany the propaganda coup of serving as an Olympic host. Written by two noted historians of Canadian Jewish history, Richard Menkis and Harold Troper, More than Just Games brings to life the collision of politics, patriotism, and the passion of sport on the eve of the Second World War.

Hitler's Games

The 1936 Olympics

Author: Duff Hart-Davis

Publisher: Olympic Marketing Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 630

A detailed, illustrated account of the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games ranges from the early planning from 1933 on to all key events of the games themselves, and covers the political and ideological factors involved

Floodlights and Touchlines: A History of Spectator Sport

Author: Rob Steen

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 256

View: 680

Shortlisted for the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award 2014 Spectator sport is living, breathing, non-stop theatre for all. Focusing on spectator sports and their accompanying issues, tracing their origins, evolution and impact, inside the lines and beyond the boundary, this book offers a thematic history of professional sport and the ingredients that magnetise millions around the globe. It tells the stories that matter: from the gladiators of Rome to the runners of Rift Valley via the innovator-missionaries of Rugby School; from multi-faceted British exports to the Americanisation of professionalism and the Indianisation of cricket. Rob Steen traces the development of these sports which captivate the turnstile millions and the mouse-clicking masses, addressing their key themes and commonalities, from creation myths to match fixing via race, politics, sexuality and internationalism. Insightful and revelatory, this is an entertaining exploration of spectator sports' intrinsic place in culture and how sport imitates life – and life imitates sport.

Nazi Germany And The Jews: The Years Of Persecution

1933-1939

Author: Saul Friedlander

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 860

A magisterial history of the Jews in Nazi Germany and the regime's policies towards them in the years prior to World War II and the Holocaust. Written by arguably the world's leading scholar on the subject. Himself a survivor, Friedlander has been a leading figure in Holocaust studies for decades and this book represents a definitive summing up of his research and that of hundreds of other historians. NAZI GERMANY AND THE JEWS: THE YEARS OF PERSECUTION is perhaps the richest examination of the subject yet written, and, crucially, one that never loses sight of the experiences of individuals in its discussion of Nazi politics and the terrible statistics and technological and administrative sophistication of the Final Solution.

Ellis Island to Ebbets Field

Sport and the American Jewish Experience

Author: Peter Levine

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 218

In Ellis Island to Ebbets Field, Peter Levine vividly recounts the stories of Red Auerbach, Hank Greenberg, Moe Berg, Sid Luckman, Nat Holman, Benny Leonard, Barney Ross, Marty Glickman, and a host of others who became Jewish heroes and symbols of the difficult struggle for American success. From settlement houses and street corners, to Madison Square and Fenway Park, their experiences recall a time when Jewish males dominated sports like boxing and basketball, helping to smash stereotypes about Jewish weakness while instilling American Jews with a fierce pride in their strength and ability in the face of Nazi aggression, domestic anti-Semitism, and economic depression. Full of marvelous stories, anecdotes, and personalities, Ellis Island to Ebbets Field enhances our understanding of the Jewish-American experience as well as the struggles of other American minority groups.

Japanese Women and Sport

Beyond Baseball and Sumo

Author: Robin Kietlinski

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 208

View: 230

In 'Japanese Women and Sport', Robin Kietlinski sets out to problematize the hegemonic image of the delicate Japanese woman, highlighting an overlooked area in the history of modern Japan. Previous studies of gender in the Japanese context do not explore the history of female participation in sport, and recent academic studies of women and sport tend to focus on Western countries. Kietlinski locates the discussion of Japanese women in sport within a larger East Asian context and considers the socio-economic position and history of modern Japan. Reaching from the early 20th century to the present day, Kietlinski traces the progression of Japanese women's participation in sport from the first female school for physical education and the foundations of competitive sport through to their growing presence in the Olympics and international sport.

The Jewish Olympics

The History of the Maccabiah Games

Author: Ron Kaplan

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 312

View: 680

Having grown from 390 athletes from fourteen countries to nine thousand athletes from seventy-eight countries, the Maccabiah Games (or the “Jewish Olympics,” as it has come to be known) continue to gain popularity. The Maccabiah Games, which take place in Israel, first began in 1932, and the latest games took place in July of 2013, with the debut of participants from Cuba, Albania, and Nicaragua. Sports range from table tennis to ice hockey, basketball, chess, and much more. Past participants have included former NBA coach Larry Brown, Olympic swimmers Mark Spitz and Jason Lezak, and Olympic gymnast Mitch Gaylord, among others. The Jewish Olympics details the history of the Maccabiah Games, including how they began, how they have grown in popularity, how they have impacted the Jewish community worldwide, and much more. In addition, it highlights the countless special achievements of the athletes over the course of the nineteen games. The Jewish Olympics is a detailed and fascinating history that will interest any sports fan, as well as individuals interested in cultural events. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Sports Publishing imprint, is proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in sports—books about baseball, pro football, college football, pro and college basketball, hockey, or soccer, we have a book about your sport or your team. In addition to books on popular team sports, we also publish books for a wide variety of athletes and sports enthusiasts, including books on running, cycling, horseback riding, swimming, tennis, martial arts, golf, camping, hiking, aviation, boating, and so much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to publishing books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked by other publishers and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

The Palgrave Dictionary of Anglo-Jewish History

Author: W. Rubinstein

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 1069

View: 316

This authoritative and comprehensive guide to key people and events in Anglo-Jewish history stretches from Cromwell's re-admittance of the Jews in 1656 to the present day and contains nearly 3000 entries, the vast majority of which are not featured in any other sources.

Finland's Holocaust

Silences of History

Author: S. Muir

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 607

Finland's Holocaust considers antisemitism and the figure of the Holocaust in today's Finland. Taking up a range of issues - from cultural history, folklore, and sports, to the interpretation of military and national history - this collection examines how the writing of history has engaged and evaded the figure of the Holocaust.

Hitler's Olympics

The 1936 Berlin Olympic Games

Author: Christopher Hilton

Publisher: History PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 317

View: 902

Published to coincide with the seventieth anniversary of the Berlin games, a vivid account of the 1936 Olympics surveys its disputes, top contributors, and events to discuss the role of propaganda, through which the Nazis claimed that Americans were anti-Semitic while defending their own policies.

The Boys in the Boat

Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics

Author: Daniel James Brown

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 416

View: 329

The #1 New York Times–bestselling story about American Olympic triumph in Nazi Germany and now the inspiration for the PBS documentary “The Boys of ‘36” For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Depression comes an irresistible story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times—the improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant. It was an unlikely quest from the start. With a team composed of the sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the University of Washington’s eight-oar crew team was never expected to defeat the elite teams of the East Coast and Great Britain, yet they did, going on to shock the world by defeating the German team rowing for Adolf Hitler. The emotional heart of the tale lies with Joe Rantz, a teenager without family or prospects, who rows not only to regain his shattered self-regard but also to find a real place for himself in the world. Drawing on the boys’ own journals and vivid memories of a once-in-a-lifetime shared dream, Brown has created an unforgettable portrait of an era, a celebration of a remarkable achievement, and a chronicle of one extraordinary young man’s personal quest. From the Trade Paperback edition.