Jefferson's Pen

The Art of Persuasion

Author: Arthur L. Rizer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 415

This focus of this book is to examine Thomas Jefferson the persuasive writer, and to analyze and extract some of the lessons his life and works offer, so that we might be able to improve in our own careers.

Jefferson on Display

Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation

Author: G. S. Wilson

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 274

When we think of Thomas Jefferson, a certain picture comes to mind for some of us, combining his physical appearance with our perception of his character. During Jefferson’s lifetime this image was already taking shape, helped along by his own assiduous cultivation. In Jefferson on Display, G. S. Wilson draws on a broad array of sources to show how Jefferson fashioned his public persona to promote his political agenda. During his long career, his image shifted from cosmopolitan intellectual to man of the people. As president he kept friends and foes guessing: he might appear unpredictably in old, worn, and out-of-date clothing with hair unkempt, yet he could as easily play the polished gentleman in a black suit, as he hosted small dinners in the President’s House that were noted for their French-inspired food and fine European wines. Even in retirement his image continued to evolve, as guests at Monticello reported being met by the Sage clothed in rough fabrics that he proudly claimed were created from his own merino sheep, leading Americans by example to manufacture their own clothing, free of Europe. By paying close attention to Jefferson’s controversial clothing choices and physical appearance--as well as his use of portraiture, architecture, and the polite refinements of dining, grooming, and conversation--Wilson provides invaluable new insight into this perplexing founder.

The Pen Commandments

Author: Steven Frank

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 336

View: 358

Steven Frank has a new approach to writing: fun first, rules to follow, success for all. In The Pen Commandments, his offbeat and entertaining guide, he's given us a book that all writers can turn to for help and a good laugh. With outrageous anecdotes (how a kid's oral surgery led to the ultimate writing assignment) and irreverent advice (Thou Shalt Not Kill Thy Sentences), Frank shows how to conquer writer's block, make friends with punctuation, and live forever in words. If you want to inspire your kids of just want to brush up on your own skills, The Pen Commandments will change—and enliven—the way you write forever. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: Retirement Series, Volume 16

1 June 1820 to 28 February 1821

Author: Thomas Jefferson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 582

This volume’s 571 documents cover both Jefferson’s opposition to restrictions on slavery in Missouri and his concession that “the boisterous sea of liberty is never without a wave.” Seeking support for the University of Virginia, he fears that southerners who receive New England educations will return with northern values. Calling it “the Hobby of my old age,” Jefferson envisions an institution dedicated to “the illimitable freedom of the human mind.” He infers approvingly from revolutionary movements in Europe and South America that “the disease of liberty is catching.” Constantine S. Rafinesque addresses three public letters to Jefferson presenting archaeological research on Kentucky’s Alligewi Indians, and Jefferson circulates a Nottoway-language vocabulary. Early in 1821 he cites declining health and advanced age as he turns over the management of his Monticello and Poplar Forest plantations to his grandson Thomas Jefferson Randolph. In discussions with trusted correspondents, Jefferson admires Jesus’s morality while doubting his miracles, discusses the materiality of the soul, and shares his thoughts on Unitarianism. Reflecting on the dwindling number of their old friends, he tells Maria Cosway that he is like “a solitary trunk in a desolate field, from which all it’s former companions have disappeared.”

Making America: A History of the United States

Author: Carol Berkin

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 976

View: 421

Shaped with a clear political chronology, MAKING AMERICA reflects the variety of individual experiences and cultures that comprise American society. MAKING AMERICA provides a clear, helpful text that meets students where they are. For instructors whose classrooms mirror the diversity of today’s college students, the strongly chronological narrative, together with an integrated program of learning and teaching aids, makes the historical content vivid and comprehensible to students at all levels of preparedness. Available in the following split options: MAKING AMERICA, Sixth Edition (Chapters 1-29), ISBN: 978-0-495-90979-8; Volume I: To 1877 (Chapters 1-15), ISBN: 978-0-495-91523-2; Volume II: Since 1865 (Chapters 15-29), ISBN: 978-0-495-91524-9. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Thomas Jefferson

a reference biography

Author: Merrill D. Peterson

Publisher: Scribner Book Company

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 513

View: 289

Twenty-five essays discuss Jefferson's accomplishments as a statesman, diplomat, scientist, architect, farmer, and politician

The art of critical reading

brushing up on your reading, thinking, and study skills

Author: Peter Mather

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 559

View: 202

Zealot

The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth

Author: Reza Aslan

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 336

View: 375

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A meticulously researched biography that challenges long-held assumptions about Jesus, from the host of CNN’s Believer NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Good Housekeeping • Booklist • Publishers Weekly • Bookish Two thousand years ago, an itinerant Jewish preacher and miracle worker walked across the Galilee, gathering followers to establish what he called the “Kingdom of God.” The revolutionary movement he launched was so threatening to the established order that he was captured, tortured, and executed as a state criminal. Within decades after his shameful death, his followers would call him God. Sifting through centuries of mythmaking, Reza Aslan sheds new light on one of history’s most influential and enigmatic characters by examining Jesus through the lens of the tumultuous era in which he lived: first-century Palestine, an age awash in apocalyptic fervor. Scores of Jewish prophets, preachers, and would-be messiahs wandered through the Holy Land, bearing messages from God. This was the age of zealotry—a fervent nationalism that made resistance to the Roman occupation a sacred duty incumbent on all Jews. And few figures better exemplified this principle than the charismatic Galilean who defied both the imperial authorities and their allies in the Jewish religious hierarchy. Balancing the Jesus of the Gospels against the historical sources, Aslan describes a man full of conviction and passion, yet rife with contradiction; a man of peace who exhorted his followers to arm themselves with swords; an exorcist and faith healer who urged his disciples to keep his identity a secret; and ultimately the seditious “King of the Jews” whose promise of liberation from Rome went unfulfilled in his brief lifetime. Aslan explores the reasons why the early Christian church preferred to promulgate an image of Jesus as a peaceful spiritual teacher rather than a politically conscious revolutionary. And he grapples with the riddle of how Jesus understood himself, the mystery that is at the heart of all subsequent claims about his divinity. Zealot yields a fresh perspective on one of the greatest stories ever told even as it affirms the radical and transformative nature of Jesus of Nazareth’s life and mission. The result is a thought-provoking, elegantly written biography with the pulse of a fast-paced novel: a singularly brilliant portrait of a man, a time, and the birth of a religion. Praise for Zealot “Riveting . . . Aslan synthesizes Scripture and scholarship to create an original account.”—The New Yorker “A lucid, intelligent page-turner.”—Los Angeles Times “Fascinatingly and convincingly drawn . . . Aslan may come as close as one can to respecting those who revere Jesus as the peace-loving, turn-the-other-cheek, true son of God depicted in modern Christianity, even as he knocks down that image.”—The Seattle Times “[Aslan’s] literary talent is as essential to the effect of Zealot as are his scholarly and journalistic chops. . . . A vivid, persuasive portrait.”—Salon “This tough-minded, deeply political book does full justice to the real Jesus, and honors him in the process.”—San Francisco Chronicle