Jefferson's Pen

The Art of Persuasion

Author: Arthur L. Rizer

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 298

View: 557

This focus of this book is to examine Thomas Jefferson the persuasive writer, and to analyze and extract some of the lessons his life and works offer, so that we might be able to improve in our own careers.

Thomas Jefferson's Education

Author: Alan Taylor

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 170

From a Pulitzer Prize–winning historian comes a brilliant, absorbing study of Thomas Jefferson’s campaign to save Virginia through education. By turns entertaining and tragic, this beautifully written history reveals the origins of a great university in the dilemmas of Virginia slavery. It offers an incisive portrait of Thomas Jefferson set against a social fabric of planters in decline, enslaved black families torn apart by sales, and a hair-trigger code of male honor. A man of “deft evasions” who was both courtly and withdrawn, Jefferson sought control of his family and state from his lofty perch at Monticello. Never quite the egalitarian we wish him to be, he advocated emancipation but shrank from implementing it, entrusting that reform to the next generation. Devoted to the education of his granddaughters, he nevertheless accepted their subordination in a masculine culture. During the revolution, he proposed to educate all white children in Virginia, but later in life he narrowed his goal to building an elite university. In 1819 Jefferson’s intensive drive for state support of a new university succeeded. His intention was a university to educate the sons of Virginia’s wealthy planters, lawyers, and merchants, who might then democratize the state and in time rid it of slavery. But the university’s students, having absorbed the traditional vices of the Virginia gentry, preferred to practice and defend them. Opening in 1825, the university nearly collapsed as unruly students abused one another, the enslaved servants, and the faculty. Jefferson’s hopes of developing an enlightened leadership for the state were disappointed, and Virginia hardened its commitment to slavery in the coming years. The university was born with the flaws of a slave society. Instead, it was Jefferson’s beloved granddaughters who carried forward his faith in education by becoming dedicated teachers of a new generation of women.

The Pen Commandments

Author: Steven Frank

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 336

View: 289

Steven Frank has a new approach to writing: fun first, rules to follow, success for all. In The Pen Commandments, his offbeat and entertaining guide, he's given us a book that all writers can turn to for help and a good laugh. With outrageous anecdotes (how a kid's oral surgery led to the ultimate writing assignment) and irreverent advice (Thou Shalt Not Kill Thy Sentences), Frank shows how to conquer writer's block, make friends with punctuation, and live forever in words. If you want to inspire your kids of just want to brush up on your own skills, The Pen Commandments will change—and enliven—the way you write forever. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Papers of Thomas Jefferson: Retirement Series, Volume 16

1 June 1820 to 28 February 1821

Author: Thomas Jefferson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 413

This volume’s 571 documents cover both Jefferson’s opposition to restrictions on slavery in Missouri and his concession that “the boisterous sea of liberty is never without a wave.” Seeking support for the University of Virginia, he fears that southerners who receive New England educations will return with northern values. Calling it “the Hobby of my old age,” Jefferson envisions an institution dedicated to “the illimitable freedom of the human mind.” He infers approvingly from revolutionary movements in Europe and South America that “the disease of liberty is catching.” Constantine S. Rafinesque addresses three public letters to Jefferson presenting archaeological research on Kentucky’s Alligewi Indians, and Jefferson circulates a Nottoway-language vocabulary. Early in 1821 he cites declining health and advanced age as he turns over the management of his Monticello and Poplar Forest plantations to his grandson Thomas Jefferson Randolph. In discussions with trusted correspondents, Jefferson admires Jesus’s morality while doubting his miracles, discusses the materiality of the soul, and shares his thoughts on Unitarianism. Reflecting on the dwindling number of their old friends, he tells Maria Cosway that he is like “a solitary trunk in a desolate field, from which all it’s former companions have disappeared.”

Jefferson on Display

Attire, Etiquette, and the Art of Presentation

Author: G. S. Wilson

Publisher: University of Virginia Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 566

When we think of Thomas Jefferson, a certain picture comes to mind for some of us, combining his physical appearance with our perception of his character. During Jefferson’s lifetime this image was already taking shape, helped along by his own assiduous cultivation. In Jefferson on Display, G. S. Wilson draws on a broad array of sources to show how Jefferson fashioned his public persona to promote his political agenda. During his long career, his image shifted from cosmopolitan intellectual to man of the people. As president he kept friends and foes guessing: he might appear unpredictably in old, worn, and out-of-date clothing with hair unkempt, yet he could as easily play the polished gentleman in a black suit, as he hosted small dinners in the President’s House that were noted for their French-inspired food and fine European wines. Even in retirement his image continued to evolve, as guests at Monticello reported being met by the Sage clothed in rough fabrics that he proudly claimed were created from his own merino sheep, leading Americans by example to manufacture their own clothing, free of Europe. By paying close attention to Jefferson’s controversial clothing choices and physical appearance--as well as his use of portraiture, architecture, and the polite refinements of dining, grooming, and conversation--Wilson provides invaluable new insight into this perplexing founder.

Thomas Jefferson

A Reference Biography

Author: Merrill D. Peterson

Publisher: Scribner Book Company

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 513

View: 787

Twenty-five essays discuss Jefferson's accomplishments as a statesman, diplomat, scientist, architect, farmer, and politician

Persuasion & Influence in American Life

Author: Gary C. Woodward

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Communication

Page: 418

View: 847

A college-level textbook presenting the nature and process of social influence in various contexts. Examples drawn from advertising, public relations, politics, religion, education, and the mass media are used for illustration. Advice is given on how to become a credible persuader. c. Book News Inc.

The Balance Sheet

A Magazine for Commercial Teachers

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Business education

Page:

View: 825

On Writing

A Process Reader

Author: Wendy Bishop

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: College readers

Page: 583

View: 655

The Jeffersonian Cyclopedia

A Comprehensive Collection of the Views of Thomas Jefferson Classified and Arranged in Alphabetical Order Under Nine Thousand Titles Relating to Government, Politics, Law, Education, Political Economy, Finance, Science, Art, Literature, Religious Freedom, Morals, Etc

Author: Thomas Jefferson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Conduct of life

Page: 1009

View: 732

Niles' Weekly Register

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 323

Containing political, historical, geographical, scientifical, statistical, economical, and biographical documents, essays and facts: together with notices of the arts and manu factures, and a record of the events of the times.