Isaiah: 40-66

Author: Walter Brueggemann

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 276

View: 294

Enthält: Vol. 1: Isaiah 1-39; Vol. 2: Isaiah 40-66.

Isaiah 40-66

Author: Walter Brueggemann

Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 274

View: 169

In this volume, Walter Brueggemann focuses on Second Isaiah (Isaiah 40-55), believed to be written by a second exilic poet, and Third Isaiah (Isaiah 56-66), a third group of texts that rearticulate Isaianic theology in yet another faith situation. Brueggemann discusses both the distinctiveness of the texts and their canonical relatedness. Books in the Westminster Bible Companion series assist laity in their study of the Bible as a guide to Christian faith and practice. Each volume explains the biblical book in its original historical context and explores its significance for faithful living today. These books are ideal for individual study and for Bible study classes and groups.

Isaiah 40-66

Author: Gary V. Smith

Publisher: B&H Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 782

View: 349

The widely heralded New American Commentary series continues with this second volume on the Old Testament book of Isaiah, detailing God’s intimacy and grandeur.

Isaiah 40-66

Author: Michael E. W. Thompson

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 222

View: 430

This commentary explores some of the most thrilling chapters of the Old Testament. The Israelites' exile is at an end, and in Isaiah 40-55 the prophet calls them to leave Babylon. Chapters 55-66 are about how these people deal with aspects of restored life in Jerusalem, the old political and religious centre, but now so different. Here also are significant passages about a Servant of the Lord, and the challenging call to servanthood on the part of God's people. Michael Thompson examines these chapters both against their original backgrounds and also as scripture for God's people today.

Isaiah 40-66

A Commentary

Author: Shalom M. Paul

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 714

View: 925

This volume presents Shalom Paul's comprehensive study of the oracles of the anonymous prophet known as Second Isaiah. In his commentary Paul offers thorough exegesis of the historical, linguistic, literary, and theological aspects of Isiah 40-66.

Isaiah 34-66, Volume 25

Revised Edition

Author: John D. W. Watts

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 432

View: 918

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship. Overview of Commentary Organization Introduction—covers issues pertaining to the whole book, including context, date, authorship, composition, interpretive issues, purpose, and theology. Each section of the commentary includes: Pericope Bibliography—a helpful resource containing the most important works that pertain to each particular pericope. Translation—the author’s own translation of the biblical text, reflecting the end result of exegesis and attending to Hebrew and Greek idiomatic usage of words, phrases, and tenses, yet in reasonably good English. Notes—the author’s notes to the translation that address any textual variants, grammatical forms, syntactical constructions, basic meanings of words, and problems of translation. Form/Structure/Setting—a discussion of redaction, genre, sources, and tradition as they concern the origin of the pericope, its canonical form, and its relation to the biblical and extra-biblical contexts in order to illuminate the structure and character of the pericope. Rhetorical or compositional features important to understanding the passage are also introduced here. Comment—verse-by-verse interpretation of the text and dialogue with other interpreters, engaging with current opinion and scholarly research. Explanation—brings together all the results of the discussion in previous sections to expose the meaning and intention of the text at several levels: (1) within the context of the book itself; (2) its meaning in the OT or NT; (3) its place in the entire canon; (4) theological relevance to broader OT or NT issues. General Bibliography—occurring at the end of each volume, this extensive bibliographycontains all sources used anywhere in the commentary.

Violence, Otherness and Identity in Isaiah 63:1-6

The Trampling One Coming from Edom

Author: Dominic S. Irudayaraj

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 155

Violence disturbs. And violent depictions, when encountered in the biblical texts, are all the more disconcerting. Isaiah 63:1-6 is an illustrative instance. The prophetic text presents the "Arriving One" in gory details ('trampling down people'; 'pouring out their lifeblood' v.6). Further, the introductory note that the Arriving One is “coming from Edom” (cf. v.1) may suggest Israel's unrelenting animosity towards Edom. These two themes: the "gory depiction" and "coming from Edom" are addressed in this book. Irudayaraj uses a social identity reading to show how Edom is consistently pictured as Israel's proximate and yet 'other'-ed entity. Approaching Edom as such thus helps situate the animosity within a larger prophetic vision of identity construction in the postexilic Third Isaian context. By adopting an iconographic reading of Isaiah 63:1-6, Irudayaraj shows how the prophetic portrayal of the 'Arriving One' in descriptions where it is clear that the 'Arriving One' is a marginalised identity correlates with the experiences of the "stooped" exiles (cf 51:14). He also demonstrates that the text leaves behind emphatic affirmations ('mighty' and 'splendidly robed' cf. v.1; “alone” cf. v.3), by which the relegated voice of the divine reasserts itself. It is in this divine reassertion that the hope of the Isaian community's reclamation of its own identity rests.

The Followers of Jesus as the 'Servant'

Luke’s Model from Isaiah for the Disciples in Luke-Acts

Author: Holly Beers

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 208

View: 817

Luke models his portrayal both of Jesus and his disciples in Luke-Acts after the human agent of the Isaianic New Exodus in Isaiah 40-66, the servant. In the Isaianic New Exodus the servant is integral to the restoration; the servant's mission being embodied is, to a great extent, how the New Exodus comes to fruition. The servant connection is at times explicit, as Jesus is identified with the servant in Luke 4:18-19 (quoting Isa 61:1-2 [with 58:6]); Luke 22:37 (citing Isa 53:12); and Acts 8:32-33 (Isa 53:7-8). Regarding the disciples, Isa 49:6 is quoted by Paul in Acts 13:47 in reference to himself and Barnabas, though a focus only on quotations is too limiting. Allusions to servant passages abound. This work argues that Luke sees Jesus fulfilling the servant role in an ultimate sense, but that his followers, modelled after him in Acts, also embody it. This can be seen in Luke's use of Isaianic servant imagery, including suffering, lack of violent response (to unjust treatment) and language in the disciples' characterization.

The Significance of Complexity

Approaching a Complex World Through Science, Theology, and the Humanities

Author: Kees van Kooten Niekerk

Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 243

View: 501

Thanks to computer simulations science is beginning to understand complex natural processes such as the weather, earthquakes and the evolution of life. The Significance of Complexity deals with the importance of the sciences of complexity - for the humanities and theology.First, three scientists explain the science of complexity and illustrate it with concrete examples. Second, two scholars consider the concept of complexity and possible applications of complexity theory within the humanities, e.g. as a tool to understand the interplay between the artist, the work of art and the user in interactive art. Finally, three theologians ask what can be learned from the science of complexity for a religious understanding of humankind and the world.The Significance of Complexity is a pioneering work exploring the importance of a fascinating new branch of science for human self-understanding. It caters for all those who are interested in relating science to the quest for the meaning of life.