London Irish Fictions

Narrative, Diaspora and Identity

Author: Tony Murray

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 222

View: 469

Examines the specific role that the metropolis plays in literary portrayals of Irish migrant experience as an arena for the performance of Irishness, as a catalyst in the transformations of Irishness and as an intrinsic component of second generation Irish identities.

An Unconsidered People

The Irish in London

Author: Catherine Dunne

Publisher: New Island Books

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 243

View: 874

Before the `Ryanair Generation', leaving home was for good. Half a million Irish men and women left these shores in the nineteen-fifties, forced by decades of economic stagnation to make their lives elsewhere. For many of these emigrants, mostly youn

Irish Crime Fiction

Author: Brian Cliff

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 203

View: 333

This book examines the recent expansion of Ireland's literary tradition to include home-grown crime fiction. It surveys the wave of books that use genre structures to explore specifically Irish issues such as the Troubles and the rise and fall of the Celtic Tiger, as well as Irish experiences of human trafficking, the supernatural, abortion, and civic corruption. These novels are as likely to address the national regulation of sexuality through institutions like the Magdalen Laundries as they are to follow serial killers through the American South or to trace international corporate conspiracies. This study includes chapters on Northern Irish crime fiction, novels set in the Republic, women protagonists, and transnational themes, and discusses Irish authors’ adaptations of a well-loved genre and their effect on assumptions about the nature of Irish literature. It is a book for readers of crime fiction and Irish literature alike, illuminating the fertile intersections of the two.

Irish Women Writers

An A-to-Z Guide

Author: Alexander G. Gonzalez

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 348

View: 587

Surveys the lives and works of roughly 75 Irish women writers active in a range of genres and periods.

Irish Childhoods

Children’s Fiction and Irish History

Author: Pádraic Whyte

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 220

View: 196

While much has been written about Irish culture’s apparent obsession with the past and with representing childhood, few critics have explored in detail the position of children’s fiction within such discourses. This book serves to redress these imbalances, illuminating both the manner in which children’s texts engage with complex cultural discourses in contemporary Ireland and the significant contribution that children’s novels and films can make to broader debates concerning Irish identity at the end of the twentieth and beginning of the twenty-first centuries. Through close analysis of specific books and films published or produced since 1990, Irish Childhoods offers an insight into contrasting approaches to the representation of Irish history and childhood in recent children’s fiction. Each chapter interrogates the unique manner in which an author or filmmaker engages with twentieth century Irish history from a contemporary perspective, and reveals that constructions of childhood in Irish children’s fiction are often used to explore aspects of Ireland’s past and present.

The Irish in Britain, 1815-1939

Author: Roger Swift

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 947

This work is a sequel to The Irish Victorian City. As a collection of national and regional studies, it reflected the consensus view of the subject by describing both the degree of the demoralization of the Irish immigrants into Britain for the early and mid-Victorian period, when they figured so largely in the official parliamentary and social reportage of the day; and then, in spite of every obvious difficulty posed by poverty, crime, disease, and prejudice, the positive aspect of the Irish Catholic achievement in the creation of enduring religious and political communities towards the end of the nineteenth century.

The Irish Diaspora

Author: Andrew Bielenberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 791

This book brings together a series of articles which provide an overview of the Irish Diaspora from a global perspective. It combines a series of survey articles on the major destinations of the Diaspora; the USA, Britian and the British Empire. On each of these, there is a number of more specialist articles by historians, demographers, economists, sociologists and geographers. The inter-disciplinary approach of the book, with a strong historical and modern focus, provides the first comprehensive survey of the topic.

Anglo-Irish Autobiography

Class, Gender, and the Forms of Narrative

Author: Elizabeth Grubgeld

Publisher: Syracuse University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 204

View: 635

As a volatile meeting point of personal and public experience, autobiography exists in a mutually influential relationship with the literature history, private writings, and domestic practices of a society. This book illuminates the ways evolving class and gender identities interact with these inherited forms of narrative to produce the testimony of a culture confronting its own demise. Elizabeth Grubgeld places Irish autobiography within the ever-widening conversation about the nature of autobiographical writing and contributes to contemporary discussions regarding Irish identity. Her emphasis on women's autobiographies provides a further reexamination of gender relations in lreland. While serving as the first critical history of its subject, this book also offers a theoretical and interpretive reading of Anglo-Irish culture that gives full attention to class, gender, and genre analysis. It examines autobiographies, letters, and diaries from the late eighteenth century though the present, with primary attention to works produced since World War I. By examining many previously neglected texts, Grubgeld both recovers lost voices and shows their work can revise our understanding of s

Irish Children's Literature and Culture

New Perspectives on Contemporary Writing

Author: Keith O'Sullivan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 214

View: 740

Irish Children’s Literature and Culture looks critically at Irish writing for children from the 1980s to the present, examining the work of many writers and illustrators and engaging with major genres, forms, and issues, including the gothic, the speculative, picturebooks, ethnicity, and globalization. It contextualizes modern Irish children’s literature in relation to Irish mythology and earlier writings, as well as in relation to Irish writing for adults, thereby demonstrating the complexity of this fascinating area. What constitutes a "national literature" is rarely straightforward, and it is especially complex when discussing writing for young people in an Irish context. Until recently, there was only a slight body of work that could be classified as "Irish children’s literature" in comparison with Ireland’s contribution to adult literature in the twentieth century. The contributors to the volume examine a range of texts in relation to contemporary literary and cultural theory, and children’s literature internationally, raising provocative questions about the future of the topic. Irish Children’s Literature and Culture is essential reading for those interested in Irish literature, culture, sociology, childhood, and children’s literature. Valerie Coghlan, Church of Ireland College of Education, Dublin, is a librarian and lecturer. She is a former co-editor of Bookbird: An International Journal of Children's Literature. She has published widely on Irish children's literature and co-edited several books on the topic. She is a former board member of the IRSCL, and a founder member of the Irish Society for the Study of Children's Literature, Children's Books Ireland, and IBBY Ireland. Keith O’Sullivan lectures in English at the Church of Ireland College of Education, Dublin. He is a founder member of the Irish Society for the Study of Children’s Literature, a former member of the board of directors of Children’s Books Ireland, and past chair of the Children’s Books Ireland/Bisto Book of the Year Awards. He has published on the works of Philip Pullman and Emily Brontë.

The Great War in Irish Poetry

W. B. Yeats to Michael Longley

Author: Fran Brearton

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 315

View: 320

The Great War in Irish Poetry explores the impact of the First World War on the work of W. B. Yeats, Robert Graves, and Louis MacNeice in the period 1914-45, and on three contemporary Northern Irish poets, Derek Mahon, Seamus Heaney, and Michael Longley. Its concern is to place their work, and memory of the Great War, in the context of Irish culture and politics in the twentieth century. The historical background to Irish involvement in the Great War is explained, as are the ways in which some of the events of 1912-1920--the Home Rule crisis, the loss of the Titanic, the Battle of the Somme, the Easter Rising--still reverberate in the politics of remembrance in Northern Ireland. While the Great War is perceived as central to English culture, and its literature holds a privileged position in the English literary canon, the centrality of the Great War to Irish writing has seldom been acknowledged. This book is concerned with the extent to which recognition of the importance of the Great War in Irish writing has become a casualty of competing versions of the literary canon. It shows that, despite complications in Irish domestic politics which led to the repression of "official memory" of the Great War in Ireland, Irish poets, particularly those writing in the "troubled" Northern Ireland of the last thirty years, have been drawn throughout the century to the events and images of 1914-18.

Mere Irish & Fíor-Ghael

Studies in the idea of Irish nationality, its literary expression and development

Author: J. Th. Leerssen

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 543

View: 337

The aim of this investigation is to reconsider the cultural confrontation between England and Ireland from a new methodological perspective, and to trace how this confrontation resulted in a particular notion, literary as well as political, of Irish nationality.

The Irish Theatre

Author: Lennox Robinson

Publisher: Ardent Media

ISBN:

Category: Irish drama

Page: 229

View: 555

Irish Political Prisoners, 1848-1922

Theatres of War

Author: Seán McConville

Publisher: Psychology Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 820

View: 372

This is a wide-ranging study of political violence and the punishment of Irish political prisoners from 1848 to the founding of the Irish Free State in 1922. Those who chose violence to advance their Irish nationalist beliefs ranged from gentlemen revolutionaries to those who openly embraced terrorism or even full-scale guerilla war. Sean McConville provides a comprehensive survey of Irish revolutionary struggle, matching chapters on punishment of offenders with descriptions and analysis of their campaigns. Government's response to political violence was determined by a number of factors, including not only the nature of the offences but also interest and support from the United States and Australia, as well as current objectives of Irish policy. Drawing on archives and special collections, many of them hitherto unused by historians, McConville also looks at the part played by punishment in the development of Anglo-Irish relations.

The Irish Times

150 Years of Influence

Author: Terence Brown

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 951

The Irish Times is a pillar of Irish society. Founded in 1859 as the paper of the Irish Protestant Middle Class, it now has a position in Irish political, social and cultural life which is incomparable. In fact this history of the Irish Times is also a history of the Irish people. Always independent in ownership and political view and never entwined in any way with the Roman Catholic Church, it has become the weather vane, the barometer of Irish life and society followed by people of all religious and political persuasions and none. The paper is politically liberal and progressive as well as being centre right on economic issues. This history is peopled by all the great figures of Irish history - Daniel O`Connell, W.B. Yeats, Garret FitzGerald, Conor Cruise O`Brien and the paper has numbered among its internationally renowned columnists Mary Holland, Fintan O'Toole, Nuala O'Faolain, John Waters and Kevin Myers . Its influence on Irish Society is beyond question. In his book, Terence Brown tells the story of the paper with narrative skill, wit and perception. Analysis of the stance of the Times during events ranging from The Easter Rising, The Civil War, the Troubles and the recent economic recession make the book essential reading for students of Irish history, be they the general reader, the academic or amateur historian. The book will be seen as crucial to our understanding of Irish history in the past century and a half.

Irish Poetry Since 1950

From Stillness Into History

Author: John Goodby

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 362

View: 852

Irish Poetry since 1950 is a survey of poetry, from Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Britain, and the US, covering the 1950s, the 1960s, the early period of the Troubles up to 1976, the 1980s and the 1990s.

Irish Imperial Networks

Migration, Social Communication and Exchange in Nineteenth-Century India

Author: Barry Crosbie

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 545

This is an innovative study of the role of Ireland and the Irish in the British Empire which examines the intellectual, cultural and political interconnections between nineteenth-century British imperial, Irish and Indian history. Barry Crosbie argues that Ireland was a crucial sub-imperial centre for the British Empire in South Asia that provided a significant amount of the manpower, intellectual and financial capital that fuelled Britain's drive into Asia from the 1750s onwards. He shows the important role that Ireland played as a centre for recruitment for the armed forces, the medical and civil services and the many missionary and scientific bodies established in South Asia during the colonial period. In doing so, the book also reveals the important part that the Empire played in shaping Ireland's domestic institutions, family life and identity in equally significant ways.