National Infrastructure Advisory Council Intelligence Information Sharing Final Report and Recommendations

Author:

Publisher: Jeffrey Frank Jones

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 997

Executive Summary The National Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) set out to determine whether the right people are receiving the right intelligence information at the right time to support robust protection and resilience of the Nation’s critical infrastructure. More than 200 interviews and extensive open-source research uncovered a wealth of insights on this complex problem. First, there have been marked improvements in the sharing of intelligence information within the Federal Intelligence Community, and between the Federal Government and regions, States, and municipalities. However, this level of improvement has not been matched in the sharing of intelligence information between the Federal Government and private sector owners and operators of critical infrastructure. Despite some notable successes, this bi-directional sharing is still relatively immature, leaving a large gap between current practices and an optimal system of effective public-private intelligence information sharing. We observe that trust is the essential glue to make this public-private system work. Trust results when partner capabilities are understood and valued, processes are tailored to leverage these capabilities, and these processes are tested and proven valuable to all partners. When breakdowns in information sharing occur, it erodes trust and is counterproductive to risk management. Information sharing is perhaps the most important factor in the protection and resilience of critical infrastructure. Information on threats to infrastructure and their likely impact underlies nearly every security decision made by owners and operators, including which assets to protect, how to make operations more resilient, how to plan for potential disasters, when to ramp up to higher levels of security, and how to respond in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. We looked at intelligence information flowing from the Federal Government to critical infrastructure owners and operators as well as risk information flowing from critical infrastructure owners and operators to the government. Our study reveals the complex ways information is gathered, analyzed, packaged, and shared among government and the owners and operators of critical infrastructures. In tackling this complex subject, we examined the different stages of the intelligence cycle, including requirements generation, information collection, analysis, and dissemination. To gather a variety of perspectives, we conducted extensive interviews with security directors, chief executives, subject matter experts, and government executives and managers. Recognizing that distinct sector characteristics shape information sharing needs, we conducted case studies of five sectors: Commercial Facilities, Healthcare and Public Health, Energy (Oil and Natural Gas), Banking and Finance, and Chemical. While we found some information sharing approaches to be effective, others were not. As a result, we adopted a “capability maturity approach,” which acknowledges that different Federal agencies have different abilities to share information effectively, and we sought to build on what is working.

Intelligence and Security Informatics for International Security

Information Sharing and Data Mining

Author: Hsinchun Chen

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 182

View: 405

Reflects a decade of leading-edge research on intelligence and security informatics. Dr Chen is researcher at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the NSF COPLINK Center for Homeland Security Information Technology Research. Describes real-world community situations. Targets wide-ranging audience: from researchers in computer science, information management and information science via analysts and policy makers in federal departments and national laboratories to consultants in IT hardware, communication, and software companies.

Data Mining for Intelligence, Fraud & Criminal Detection

Advanced Analytics & Information Sharing Technologies

Author: Christopher Westphal

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN:

Category: Law

Page: 440

View: 828

In 2004, the Government Accountability Office provided a report detailing approximately 200 government-based data-mining projects. While there is comfort in knowing that there are many effective systems, that comfort isn’t worth much unless we can determine that these systems are being effectively and responsibly employed. Written by one of the most respected consultants in the area of data mining and security, Data Mining for Intelligence, Fraud & Criminal Detection: Advanced Analytics & Information Sharing Technologies reviews the tangible results produced by these systems and evaluates their effectiveness. While CSI-type shows may depict information sharing and analysis that are accomplished with the push of a button, this sort of proficiency is more fiction than reality. Going beyond a discussion of the various technologies, the author outlines the issues of information sharing and the effective interpretation of results, which are critical to any integrated homeland security effort. Organized into three main sections, the book fully examines and outlines the future of this field with an insider’s perspective and a visionary’s insight. Section 1 provides a fundamental understanding of the types of data that can be used in current systems. It covers approaches to analyzing data and clearly delineates how to connect the dots among different data elements Section 2 provides real-world examples derived from actual operational systems to show how data is used, manipulated, and interpreted in domains involving human smuggling, money laundering, narcotics trafficking, and corporate fraud Section 3 provides an overview of the many information-sharing systems, organizations, and task forces as well as data interchange formats. It also discusses optimal information-sharing and analytical architectures Currently, there is very little published literature that truly defines real-world systems. Although politics and other factors all play into how much one agency is willing to support the sharing of its resources, many now embrace the wisdom of that path. This book will provide those individuals with an understanding of what approaches are currently available and how they can be most effectively employed.

Intelligence Information Sharing: Final Report and Recommendations

Author: National Advisory Council

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 236

View: 282

The National Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) set out to determine whether the right people are receiving the right intelligence information at the right time to support robust protection and resilience of the Nation's critical infrastructure. More than 200 interviews and extensive open-source research uncovered a wealth of insights on this complex problem. First, there have been marked improvements in the sharing of intelligence information within the Federal Intelligence Community, and between the Federal Government and regions, States, and municipalities. However, this level of improvement has not been matched in the sharing of intelligence information between the Federal Government and private sector owners and operators of critical infrastructure. Despite some notable successes, this bidirectional sharing is still relatively immature, leaving a large gap between current practices and an optimal system of effective public-private intelligence information sharing. We observe that trust is the essential glue to make this public-private system work. Trust results when partner capabilities are understood and valued, processes are tailored to leverage these capabilities, and these processes are tested and proven valuable to all partners. When breakdowns in information sharing occur, it erodes trust and is counterproductive to risk management. Information sharing is perhaps the most important factor in the protection and resilience of critical infrastructure. Information on threats to infrastructure and their likely impact underlies nearly every security decision made by owners and operators, including which assets to protect, how to make operations more resilient, how to plan for potential disasters, when to ramp up to higher levels of security, and how to respond in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. We looked at intelligence information flowing from the Federal Government to critical infrastructure owners and operators as well as risk information flowing from critical infrastructure owners and operators to the government. Our study reveals the complex ways information is gathered, analyzed, packaged, and shared among the owners and operators of critical infrastructures. In tackling this complex subject, we examined the different stages of the intelligence cycle, including requirements generation, information collection, analysis, and dissemination. To gather a variety of perspectives, we conducted extensive interviews with security directors, chief executives, subject matter experts, and government executives and managers. Recognizing that distinct sector characteristics shape information sharing needs, we conducted case studies of five sectors: Commercial Facilities, Healthcare and Public Health, Energy (Oil and Natural Gas), Banking and Finance, and Chemical. While we found some information sharing approaches to be effective, others were not. As a result, we adopted a "capability maturity approach," which acknowledges that different Federal agencies have different abilities to share information effectively, and we sought to build on what is working. The Administration requested that the NIAC examine three specific topics in this study: Review the overall progress and status of bi-directional intelligence information sharing. Examine ways to improve the private sector role in counterintelligence. Assess the role of fusion centers as a mechanism for sharing intelligence information with the private sector.

National Strategy for Information Sharing

Successes and Challenges in Improving Terrorism-Related Information Sharing

Author: Barry Leonard

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 16

View: 762

Contents: (1) The Need for a Nat. Strategy; Guiding Principles; Linkage with Other Nat. Strategies; (2) Background and the Current Environment: What Has Been Accomplished Since 9/11?; Continuing Challenges; Legislative and Regulatory Background; (3) Sharing Info. at the Fed. Level; (4) Sharing Info. with State and Local Gov¿ts.; Interagency Threat Assessment and Coordination Group; State and Major Urban Area Fusion Centers; (4) Sharing Info. with the Private Sector; (5) Sharing Info. with Foreign Partners; (6) Protecting Privacy and Other Legal Rights in the Sharing of Info.: Core Privacy Principles; Privacy Governance; (7) Institutionalizing the Strategy for Long-Term Success: Protecting the Info. Privacy and Legal Rights of Amer.

A Report Card on Homeland Security Information Sharing

Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives, One Hundred Tenth Congress, Second Session, September 24, 2008

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Homeland Security. Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Government publications

Page: 71

View: 398

Intelligence Information

Need-To-Know Vs. Need-to-Share

Author: Richard A. Best, Jr.

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 15

View: 921

Unauthorized disclosures of classified intelligence are seen as doing significant damage to U.S. security. This is the case whether information is disclosed to a foreign government or published on the Internet. On the other hand, if intelligence is not made available to government officials who need it to do their jobs, enormous expenditures on collection, analysis, and dissemination are wasted. These conflicting concerns require careful and difficult balancing.Investigations of the 9/11 attacks concluded that both technical and policy barriers had limited sharing of information collected by different agencies that, if viewed together, could have provided useful insight into the unfolding plot. A consensus emerged that U.S. intelligenceagencies should share information more widely in order that analysts could integrate clues acquired by different agencies in order to "connect the dots." This report focuses on information acquired, analyzed, and disseminated by agencies of the U.S. Intelligence Community, but these concerns also affect classified information outside the Intelligence Community. Contents: (1) Background; (2) Changes Undertaken in Response to 9/11: The Information Sharing Environment; (3) Limitations and Risks of Information Sharing: Detroit Bomb Attempt; Fort Hood Shooting; WikiLeaks; (4) Conclusion. This is a print on demand report.

Information Sharing Among Intelligence, Law Enforcement, and Other Federal, State, and Local Agencies

Author: Bruce H. Perry

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Information services

Page: 28

View: 699

"Without a doubt, the terrorist events of 9/11 have forever changed the security posture of the United States of America. In today's society, the need for improved information sharing of terrorist-related information across all levels of Federal, State, and local government is a critical challenge. Though the United States (U.S.) has made much progress in this area, there still remains a great deal of work to be performed in order to ensure the wide-spread and timely coordination and dissemination of terrorist-related information. On October 2007, the U.S. published the National Strategy for Information Sharing that emphasized the challenges in improving terrorist-related information sharing. As America grapples with the transformation and reshaping of its local law enforcement and military services to better deal with terrorist operations and threats being imposed on American civil liberties, so to most Americans adapt their way of thinking with regard to performing intelligence information sharing to avert terrorist-related threats directed at the U.S. homeland. As stressed within the U.S. National Strategy for Information Sharing, the success of an improved information sharing environment must be constructed upon a foundation of trusted partnerships among all levels of government, the private sector, and our allies based on a shared commitment to detect, prevent, disrupt, preempt, and mitigate the effects of terrorism."--Abstract from web site.

Terrorism Information Sharing and the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Report Initiative

Background and Issues for Congress

Author: Mark A. Randol

Publisher: DIANE Publishing Inc.

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 23

View: 879

The 9/11 Commission cited breakdowns in info. sharing and the failure to fuse pertinent intelligence as key factors in the failure to prevent the 9/11 attacks. Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) contain info. about criminal activity that may also reveal terrorist pre-operational planning. The Nationwide SAR Initiative (NSI) is an effort to have most law enforcement org. participate in a standardized, integrated approach to gathering, documenting, processing, and analyzing terrorism-related SARs. This report describes the NSI, the rationale for the sharing of terrorism-related SARs, and how the NSI seeks to achieve this objective. It also examines the privacy and civil liberties concerns raised by the initiative.

State and Local Intelligence in the War on Terrorism

Author: K. Jack Riley

Publisher: Rand Corporation

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 90

View: 560

Examines how state and local law enforcement agencies conducted and supported counterterrorism intelligence activities after 9/11. The report analyzes data from a 2002 survey of law enforcement preparedness in the context of intelligence, shows how eight local law enforcement agencies handle intelligence operations, and suggests ways that the job of gathering and analyzing intelligence might best be shared among federal, state, and local agencies.

Building a Partnership Strategy

Improving Information Sharing with State and Local Law Enforcement and the Private Sector : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives, One Hundred Tenth Congress, First Session, May 25, 2007

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Homeland Security. Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic books

Page: 61

View: 267

Federal Support for Homeland Security Information Sharing

Role of the Information Sharing Program Manager : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives, One Hundred Ninth Congress, First Session, November 8, 2005

Author: United States

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic government information

Page: 58

View: 485

Homeland Security Intelligence

Its Relevance and Limitations : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eleventh Congress, First Session, March 18, 2009

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Homeland Security. Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Intelligence service

Page: 66

View: 407

Information Sharing Environment

Definition of the Results to Be Achieved in Improving Terrorism-Related Info. Sharing Is Needed to Guide Implementation and Assess Progress

Author: Eileen R. Larence

Publisher: DIANE Publishing

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 57

View: 327

The attacks on 9/11 underscored the fed. government¿s need to facilitate terrorism-related info. sharing among gov¿t., private sector, and foreign stakeholders. In response, the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act mandated the creation of the Info. Sharing Environment (ISE), which is an approach for the sharing of terrorism-related info. A Program Manager oversees ISE development with assistance from the Info. Sharing Council, a forum for 16 info. sharing officials from fed. agencies and dep¿ts. This is a report on: (1) what actions have been taken to guide the design and implementation of the ISE; and (2) what efforts have been made to report on progress in implementing the ISE. Includes recommendations. Illustrations.

Responding Terrorism

Through Better Coordination and Information Sharing Between Intelligence Agencies

Author: Serkan Tatil

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 69

View: 213

Homeland Security and Intelligence, 2nd Edition

Author: Keith Gregory Logan

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 365

View: 891

Now updated and expanded for its second edition, this book investigates the role intelligence plays in maintaining homeland security and emphasizes that effective intelligence collection and analysis are central to reliable homeland security. • Addresses the most recent changes in homeland security and intelligence, explains the dynamics and structure of the intelligence community, and assesses the effectiveness of new intelligence processes • Focuses on the evolving structure of the intelligence community and its processes in the age of ISIS and organized, widespread terrorist threats as witnessed by the events in Boston, San Bernardino, and Paris • Contains seven new chapters as well as revisions and updates throughout this second edition • Underscores how intelligence can work—and needs to function—across homeland security efforts at the federal, state, and local levels

Information Sharing Mechanisms Prior to the September 11 Attack. Evaluation of Effectiveness and Subsequent Reforms

Author: Caroline Mutuku

Publisher: GRIN Verlag

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 10

View: 267

Seminar paper from the year 2018 in the subject Politics - International Politics - Topic: Peace and Conflict Studies, Security, grade: 1.2, , language: English, abstract: September 11, 2001, a terrorist attack on the U.S cities occurred to the Americans and the world at large. This attack was regarded as one of the most disastrous failure of the U.S. intelligence, which caused 3,000 deaths. This failure was attributable to the unprecedented ineffectiveness of information sharing mechanisms. Therefore, this case study will give an evaluation of the effectiveness of information sharing regarding the 9/11 attack and the subsequent reforms.

A DHS Intelligence Enterprise

Still Just a Vision Or Reality? : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eleventh Congress, Second Session, May 12, 2010

Author: United States. Congress. House. Committee on Homeland Security. Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Intelligence service

Page: 32

View: 239

The Homeland Security Information Network

An Update on DHS Information-sharing Efforts : Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Intelligence, Information Sharing, and Terrorism Risk Assessment of the Committee on Homeland Security, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Ninth Congress, Second Session, September 13, 2006

Author: United States

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Communication in law enforcement

Page: 53

View: 373