Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale, Third Edition

Author: Thelma Harms

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 96

View: 876

This revised and updated assessment tool focuses on the full range of needs of infants and toddlers up to 36 months of age and provides a framework for improving program quality. ITERS-3 assesses both environmental provisions and teacher-child interactions that affect the broad developmental milestones of infants and toddlers, including: language, cognitive, social-emotional and physical development as well as concern for health and safety.

Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale (ITERS-3)

Author: Thelma Harms

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 104

View: 980

Building on extensive feedback from the field as well as vigorous new research on how best to support infant and toddler development and learning, the authors have revised and updated the widely used Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale. ITERS-3 is the next-generation assessment tool for use in center-based child care programs for infants and toddlers up to 36 months of age. ITERS-3 focuses on the full range of needs of infants and toddlers and provides a framework for improving program quality. Further, the scale assesses both environmental provisions and teacher-child interactions that affect the broad developmental milestones of infants and toddlers, including: language, cognitive, social-emotional and physical development, as well as concern for health and safety. ITERS-3 is appropriate for state- and district-wide QRIS and continuous quality improvement, program evaluation by directors and supervisors, teacher self-evaluation, monitoring by agency staff, and teacher training programs. The established reliability and validity of the scale make it particularly useful for research and program evaluation. While the approach to assessing quality and the scoring process remain the same for the new ITERS-3, users will find the following improvements informed by extensive use of the ITERS in the field and by the most recent research: Enhanced focus on interactions and the role of the teacher. Six new language and literacy Items. A new Item on beginning math experiences. Expanded age range to include children from birth to 36 months. A new approach to scoring based solely on observation of ongoing classroom activity (3-hour time sample). The elimination of the parents/staff subscale and teacher interviews, freeing up time for observing more actual classroom practice. Improved indicator scaling, providing more precise and useful scores for use in professional development and self-improvement. Reduced emphasis on the number of materials, along with greater emphasis on how materials are used to encourage learning. Suitable for use in inclusive and culturally diverse programs, ITERS-3 subscales evaluate: Space and Furnishings Personal Care Routines Language and Books Activities Interaction Program Structure

Open-Ended Art for Young Children

Author: Tracy Galuski

Publisher: Redleaf Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 154

View: 682

Open-ended art is defined as art activity where children are free to use their imagination as they explore a variety of materials without a planned outcome. When teachers embrace open-ended art, they emphasize the process of creating, and observe the developmental growth being experienced by the children. Open-ended art provides children an important opportunity to think about, feel, and express ideas. It helps teachers slow down the pace of the activity in order to observe and feel the environment all around. There are many books available to educators that include art ideas and projects, but Open-Ended Art for Young Children goes beyond the basics to highlight why the field of early childhood education advocates for open-ended art, and explain how to adapt to new ways of thinking about art. Authors Dr. Tracy Galuski and Dr. Mary Ellen Bardsley present, chapter by chapter, the challenges teachers encounter when faced with best practices and expectations related art process and product. Each chapter begins with a classroom vignette that describes the challenge, followed by a plethora of solutions, grounded in research and illustrated through practical examples. Each chapter includes full color pictures and photos, and ends with an activity or investigation for reflection.

Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS-R)

Revised Edition

Author: Thelma Harms

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 86

View: 896

Featuring a spiral binding, the updated Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale, ® ECERS-R, offers more practical assistance in the form of an Expanded Score Sheet (which contains a worksheet) and additional notes for clarification to improve accuracy in scoring. However, the items and indicators remain the same as in the original ECERS-R. Designed for preschool, kindergarten, and child care classrooms serving children 21⁄2 through 5 years of age, this widely used program quality assessment instrument can be used by program directors for supervision and program improvement, by teaching staff for self-assessment, by agency staff for monitoring, and in teacher training programs. The established reliability and validity of the ECERS-R make it particularly useful for research and program evaluation. Convenient Organization in seven subscales Space and Furnishings Personal Care Routines Language-Reasoning Activities Interaction Program Structure Parents and Staff Each of the 43 items is expressed as a 7-point scale with indicators for 1 (inadequate), 3 (minimal), 5 (good), and 7 (excellent). Notes for clarification and sample questions are included to improve accuracy in scoring. An introductory section gives detailed information about the rationale for the ECERS-R, the process of revision, and the reliability and validity of the scale. Full instructions for administration and scoring, as well as an Expanded Scoresheet and Profile that may be photocopied, are included with the scale.

Family Child Care Environment Rating Scale (FCCERS-3)

Author: Thelma Harms

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 104

View: 482

Building on feedback from the field, as well as current research on supporting young children’s development and learning, the authors have revised and updated the widely used Family Child Care Environment Rating Scale®. FCCERS-3 is the next-generation assessment tool for use in home-based child care programs for children from infancy through school age (birth to age 12). FCCERS-3 focuses on the full range of needs of the wide age-range of children often found in family child care programs. Further, the scale assesses both environmental provisions and provider-child interactions that contribute to children’s learning and development, including language, cognitive, social-emotional, and physical development, as well as concerns for health and safety. FCCERS-3 is appropriate for state- and district-wide QRIS and continuous quality improvement, for provider self-assessment, and as a learning or monitoring tool within networks of family providers. The established reliability and validity of the scale make it particularly useful for research and program evaluation with family child care programs. While the approach to assessing quality and the scoring process remain the same for the new FCCERS-3, users will find the following improvements informed by extensive use of the FCCERS in the field and by the most recent research: Enhanced focus on interactions and the role of the provider.Six new language and literacy Items.A new Item on math experiences.A new approach to scoring based solely on observation of ongoing program activity (3-hour time sample).The elimination of the Parents and Provider subscale and provider interview, freeing up time for observing more actual programming.Improved indicator scaling, providing more precise and useful scores for use in self-improvement and professional development.Reduced emphasis on the number of materials, along with greater emphasis on how materials are used to encourage learning. Suitable for use in inclusive and culturally diverse programs, FCCERS-3 subscales evaluate: Space and Furnishings Personal Care RoutinesLanguage and BooksActivitiesInteractionProgram Structure

Supporting Play in Early Childhood: Environment, Curriculum, Assessment

Author: Dorothy Justus Sluss

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 368

View: 655

Every preschool, kindergarten, and primary teacher should have SUPPORTING PLAY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD: ENVIRONMENT, CURRICULUM, ASSESSMENT, 3rd Edition, in their personal library. Readable yet thorough, this book and supporting materials provide a comprehensive approach to designing, implementing, and evaluating play-based programs for young children. The first two chapters situate play in the context of historical and current theory while providing information about the role of play in the growth and development of the child. Current topics such as connections to neurological research, culture and diversity, play for children with special needs, outdoor learning settings, STEM, Reggio Emilia, and the importance of interactions with adults are addressed. Symbols throughout the text show the alignment of the content with NAEYC and CEC/DEC standards. Sample lesson plans are in the appendix. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Child Maltreatment in Residential Care

History, Research, and Current Practice

Author: Adrian V. Rus

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 555

View: 924

This data-rich volume reviews short- and long-term consequences of residential or institutional care for children across the globe as well as approaches to reducing maltreatment. Up-to-date findings from a wide range of developing and developed countries identify forms of abuse and neglect associated with institutionalization and their effects on development and pathology in younger children, adolescents, and alumni. The sections on intervention strategies highlight the often-conflicting objectives facing professionals and policymakers balancing the interests of children, families, and facilities. But despite many national and regional variations, two themes stand out: the universal right of children to live in safety, and the ongoing need for professionals and community to ensure this safety. Included among the topics: Maltreatment and living conditions in long-term residential institutions for children Outcomes from institutional rearing Recommendations to improve institutional living Historical, political, socio-economic, and cultural influences on Child Welfare Systems Latin American and the Caribbean, African, Asian, Middle-Eastern, Western and Eastern European countries and the United States of America are presented. Child Maltreatment in Residential Care will inform psychology professionals interested in the role of residential care in the lives of children, and possibilities for improved outcomes. It will also interest social workers and mental health practitioners and researchers seeking evidence-based interventions for families adopting children from residential care.

For Our Babies

Ending the Invisible Neglect of America's Infants

Author: J. Ronald Lally

Publisher: Teachers College Press

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 192

View: 288

For the last forty years, J. Ronald Lally has worked with state and federal agencies to improve services for infants and toddlers in the United States and abroad. In this new book, Lally paints a stark picture of how our babies have been forced to shoulder the fallout of massive societal changes over the past 60 years—changes that have resulted in less access to their parents, longer time spent in child care, and substandard child care and services. For Our Babies features the resonant voices of American parents speaking of their hopes, worries, and frustrations living in a country with too few parental and child supports. It describes American parents’ general lack of awareness about how little they receive from their state and federal governments compared to parents living in other countries. This important book includes crucial testimony from developmental psychologists, child care providers, health and mental health professionals, economists, specialists in brain development, and early learning educators about how policy and practices must change in the United States if parents are to raise children who will become healthy, productive members of society. This book is part of the For Our Babies initiative. Visit the website, which includes an author blog, at www.forourbabies.org. J. Ronald Lally is the co-director of the Center for Child and Family Studies at WestEd, an educational research and development laboratory in San Francisco. He created the Program for Infant and Toddler Care and is one of the founders of Zero to Three: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families. “Lally is right. Our economy and our society will be stronger if public policies do more to help raise healthy babies. I applaud his tireless efforts to increase national awareness about the critical importance of improving early childhood development for all families.” —U.S. Congressman George Miller (D-CA-11) “Dr. Lally’s book sensitively captures the tension in knowing that infants at birth are both full of unlimited developmental potential and at the same time desperately dependent on their surroundings. And, thankfully, it is filled with ways to act on his informed and urgent plea for action to change policy and practice.” —Carol Brunson Day, President, Brunson Phillips & Day, Inc. “Professor Lally draws on a lifetime of working with infants to review and synthesize the research about the importance of the first 3 years of life, and what babies need—especially from their relationships with parents and caregivers—to thrive developmentally and socially. He then paints a disturbing picture of how present policies are failing young children—the invisible neglect. This book is a ‘must read’ for all who care about young children and their future.” —Frank Oberklaid, Director, Centre for Community Child Health, Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne “This is a clarion and moving call on behalf of our most vulnerable and valuable citizens, our amazing babies. It gathers together the freshest and broadest knowledge of what they need to flourish and contrasts this to the myriad ways our policies and practices consistently fail them. For Our Babies is an energizing, enlightening, and wholly loving book.” —Jeree Pawl, Clinical Pyschologist, Board of Directors, Zero to Three “Lally and others, including some of the economists cited in this book, have shown how investments in quality early education and preventive healthcare will more than pay for themselves when children reach adulthood. . . . This book is a starting place for urgently needed dialogue that will finally lead to action.” —From the Foreword by T. Berry Brazelton and Joshua Sparrow, Harvard University