Inexhaustibility

A Non-Exhaustive Treatment

Author: Torkel Franzén

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 251

View: 787

Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. This volume, the sixteenth publication in the Lecture Notes in Logic series, gives a sustained presentation of a particular view of the topic of Gödelian extensions of theories. It presents the basic material in predicate logic, set theory and recursion theory, leading to a proof of Gödel's incompleteness theorems. The inexhaustibility of mathematics is treated based on the concept of transfinite progressions of theories as conceived by Turing and Feferman. All concepts and results are introduced as needed, making the presentation self-contained and thorough. Philosophers, mathematicians and others will find the book helpful in acquiring a basic grasp of the philosophical and logical results and issues.

Alan Turing: His Work and Impact

Author: S. Barry Cooper

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 944

View: 512

In this 2013 winner of the prestigious R.R. Hawkins Award from the Association of American Publishers, as well as the 2013 PROSE Awards for Mathematics and Best in Physical Sciences & Mathematics, also from the AAP, readers will find many of the most significant contributions from the four-volume set of the Collected Works of A. M. Turing. These contributions, together with commentaries from current experts in a wide spectrum of fields and backgrounds, provide insight on the significance and contemporary impact of Alan Turing's work. Offering a more modern perspective than anything currently available, Alan Turing: His Work and Impact gives wide coverage of the many ways in which Turing's scientific endeavors have impacted current research and understanding of the world. His pivotal writings on subjects including computing, artificial intelligence, cryptography, morphogenesis, and more display continued relevance and insight into today's scientific and technological landscape. This collection provides a great service to researchers, but is also an approachable entry point for readers with limited training in the science, but an urge to learn more about the details of Turing's work. 2013 winner of the prestigious R.R. Hawkins Award from the Association of American Publishers, as well as the 2013 PROSE Awards for Mathematics and Best in Physical Sciences & Mathematics, also from the AAP Named a 2013 Notable Computer Book in Computing Milieux by Computing Reviews Affordable, key collection of the most significant papers by A.M. Turing Commentary explaining the significance of each seminal paper by preeminent leaders in the field Additional resources available online

Alan Turing's Systems of Logic

The Princeton Thesis

Author: Andrew W. Appel

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Computers

Page: 160

View: 103

Between inventing the concept of a universal computer in 1936 and breaking the German Enigma code during World War II, Alan Turing (1912-1954), the British founder of computer science and artificial intelligence, came to Princeton University to study mathematical logic. Some of the greatest logicians in the world--including Alonzo Church, Kurt Gödel, John von Neumann, and Stephen Kleene--were at Princeton in the 1930s, and they were working on ideas that would lay the groundwork for what would become known as computer science. This book presents a facsimile of the original typescript of Turing's fascinating and influential 1938 Princeton PhD thesis, one of the key documents in the history of mathematics and computer science. The book also features essays by Andrew Appel and Solomon Feferman that explain the still-unfolding significance of the ideas Turing developed at Princeton. A work of philosophy as well as mathematics, Turing's thesis envisions a practical goal--a logical system to formalize mathematical proofs so they can be checked mechanically. If every step of a theorem could be verified mechanically, the burden on intuition would be limited to the axioms. Turing's point, as Appel writes, is that "mathematical reasoning can be done, and should be done, in mechanizable formal logic." Turing's vision of "constructive systems of logic for practical use" has become reality: in the twenty-first century, automated "formal methods" are now routine. Presented here in its original form, this fascinating thesis is one of the key documents in the history of mathematics and computer science.

The History of Philosophical and Formal Logic

From Aristotle to Tarski

Author: Alex Malpass

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 912

The History of Philosophical and Formal Logic introduces ideas and thinkers central to the development of philosophical and formal logic. From its Aristotelian origins to the present-day arguments, logic is broken down into four main time periods: Antiquity and the Middle Ages (Aristotle and The Stoics) The early modern period (Bolzano, Boole) High modern period (Frege, Peano & Russell and Hilbert) Early 20th century (Godel and Tarski) Each new time frame begins with an introductory overview highlighting themes and points of importance. Chapters discuss the significance and reception of influential works and look at historical arguments in the context of contemporary debates. To support independent study, comprehensive lists of primary and secondary reading are included at the end of chapters, along with exercises and discussion questions. By clearly presenting and explaining the changes to logic across the history of philosophy, The History of Philosophical and Formal Logic constructs an easy-to-follow narrative. This is an ideal starting point for students looking to understand the historical development of logic.

Logical Foundations of Mathematics and Computational Complexity

A Gentle Introduction

Author: Pavel Pudlák

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 695

View: 902

The two main themes of this book, logic and complexity, are both essential for understanding the main problems about the foundations of mathematics. Logical Foundations of Mathematics and Computational Complexity covers a broad spectrum of results in logic and set theory that are relevant to the foundations, as well as the results in computational complexity and the interdisciplinary area of proof complexity. The author presents his ideas on how these areas are connected, what are the most fundamental problems and how they should be approached. In particular, he argues that complexity is as important for foundations as are the more traditional concepts of computability and provability. Emphasis is on explaining the essence of concepts and the ideas of proofs, rather than presenting precise formal statements and full proofs. Each section starts with concepts and results easily explained, and gradually proceeds to more difficult ones. The notes after each section present some formal definitions, theorems and proofs. Logical Foundations of Mathematics and Computational Complexity is aimed at graduate students of all fields of mathematics who are interested in logic, complexity and foundations. It will also be of interest for both physicists and philosophers who are curious to learn the basics of logic and complexity theory.

The Logica Yearbook

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Logic, Symbolic and mathematical

Page:

View: 398

Logic Colloquium 2000

proceedings of the Annual European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, held in Paris, France, July 23-31, 2000

Author: René Cori

Publisher: A K Peters Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Mathematics

Page: 408

View: 145

This compilation of papers presented at the 2000 European Summer Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic marks the centenial anniversery of Hilbert's famous lecture. Held in the same hall at La Sorbonne where Hilbert first presented his famous problems, this meeting carries special significance to the Mathematics and Logic communities. The presentations include tutorials and research articles from some of the world's preeminent logicians. Three long articles are based on tutorials given at the meeting, and present accessible expositions of devloping research in three active areas of logic: model theory, computability, and set theory. The eleven subsequent articles cover seperate research topics in all areas of mathematical logic, including: aspects in Computer Science, Proof Theory, Set Theory, Model Theory, Computability Theory, and aspects of Philosophy.