Inspiration and Incarnation

Evangelicals and the Problem of the Old Testament

Author: Peter Enns

Publisher: Baker Academic

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 224

View: 225

How can an evangelical view of Scripture be reconciled with modern biblical scholarship? In this book Peter Enns, an expert in biblical interpretation, addresses Old Testament phenomena that challenge traditional evangelical perspectives on Scripture. He then suggests a way forward, proposing an incarnational model of biblical inspiration that takes seriously both the divine and the human aspects of Scripture. This tenth anniversary edition has an updated bibliography and includes a substantive postscript that reflects on the reception of the first edition.

Incarnation and Inspiration

John Owen and the Coherence of Christology

Author: Alan Spence

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 164

View: 828

An introduction to the theology of John Owen, and an exposition of the theological dynamic underlying the christology of the Fathers and the Definition of Chalcedon.

Tradition and Incarnation

Foundations of Christian Theology

Author: William L. Portier

Publisher: Paulist Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 380

View: 150

This two-part text for introductory theology courses at the undergraduate level explores foundational concepts dealing with revelation and various christological themes. +

The Promise of the Trinity

The Covenant of Redemption in the Theologies of Witsius, Owen, Dickson, Goodwin, and Cocceius

Author: B. Hoon Woo

Publisher: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 319

View: 925

The doctrine of the pactum salutis (covenant of redemption) offers the idea of a covenant between the very persons of the Trinity for the redemption of humanity. The doctrine received most of its attention in seventeenth-century Reformed theology, and has been criticized and almost totally forgotten in dogmatics since the eighteenth century. Most recent Reformed dogmatics tend to ignore the doctrine or disparage it from biblical, trinitarian, christological, pneumatological, and soteriological perspectives-namely, the doctrine lacks scriptural basis; it is tritheistic; it leads to subordination of the Son; it omits the role of the Holy Spirit; and it applies a deterministic idea for the Christian life. The theologies of Witsius, Owen, Dickson, Goodwin, and Cocceius portray a very robust form of the doctrine. Witsius argues with the help of a peculiar methodology of cross-referencing and collation of related scriptural texts that the doctrine is firmly based on biblical exegesis that was passed on from the patristic era. The doctrine formulated by Owen endorses the doctrines of inseparable operations and terminus operationis so as to give deep insight into the Trinity. In Dickson's doctrine, the Son's voluntary consent and obedience to the will of the Father are highly emphasized. Likewise, Goodwin's depiction of the Holy Spirit secures the divinity of the Spirit as well as his indispensable role for the transaction and accomplishment of the pactum. The doctrine in the theology of Cocceius sheds much light on the vibrant dynamic of the Christian life in accordance with the ordo salutis. The doctrine of the pactum salutis of the five Reformed theologians clearly shows that the doctrine is both promised and promising for theology and the life of faith.

The Presbyterian and Reformed Review

Author: Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Periodicals

Page:

View: 988

Includes section "Reviews of recent theological literature".

Incarnation and Inspiration

John Owen and the Coherence of Christology

Author: Alan John Spence

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Electronic books

Page: 164

View: 205

In Incarnation and Inspiration Alan Spence looks at the theology of John Owen, examining Owen's efforts to integrate the concepts of incarnation and inspiration into one coherent Christology. Owen offers a solution to this most intractable of christological dilemmas through his idea that the divine Son acted on his own human nature indirectly and by means of the Holy Spirit. The foundation of the Spirit's distinctive work is thereby the renewal of the image of God through the humanity of Christ. Spence's study raises such questions as: can a Christology which affirms the distinct operation of Christ's two natures successfully maintain the unity of his personal action? Is nature or ontological language too static to model the dynamic reality of Christ? Can the actions of God be indivisible if the Son relates to the Father as to one who is other than himself? Finally Spence grounds the discussion in more general terms by assessing the significance of Owen's Christology in relation to the Definition of Chalcedon and to modern theology. --From publisher's description.

Historical Theology: An Introduction

Author: Geoffrey W. Bromiley

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 496

View: 758

Introduces the reader to the views of the most outstanding theologians in the history of Christianity. The book's three sections deal with Patristic Theology, Medieval and Reformation Theology, and Modern Theology.

From Plato to Jesus

What Does Philosophy Have to Do with Theology?

Author: C. Marvin Pate

Publisher: Kregel Academic

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 755

Discover philosophy's impact on Christianity in this new theology textbook

Trinity, Revelation, and Reading

A Theological Introduction to the Bible and its Interpretation

Author: Scott R. Swain

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 168

View: 838

A theology of biblical interpretation, treating both topics in light of their relationship to the triune God and the economy of redemption.

The Holy Spirit as Communion

Colin Gunton's Pneumatology of Communion and Frank Macchia's Pneumatology of Koinonia

Author: I. Leon Harris

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 258

View: 150

In The Holy Spirit as Communion, Leon Harris examines the pneumatologies of Colin Gunton and Frank Macchia. For both theologians, the doctrine of the Holy Spirit is foundational to understanding their doctrine of God, Christology, and ecclesiology. Drawing on the theme of communion, The Holy Spirit as Communion expresses the concept that the Holy Spirit is the person who perfects the divine nature and personhood of the Father and Son. It is the Holy Spirit who perfects the eternal communion within the divine Trinity, which is the source of the divine action that also perfects the communion in creation as an expression of the Father’s will through Jesus Christ. The Holy Spirit as Communion explores the essentiality of the Holy Spirit through a unique approach to Spirit Christology: Gunton is represented by a radicalized version of Chalcedon Christology, and Macchia formulates his account through the overarching metaphor of “Spirit baptism.” Therefore, the doctrine of God, Christology, ecclesiology, and eschatology cannot be construed without a proper account of pneumatology that takes into consideration the eschatological perfecting work of the third person of the Trinity—who perfects creation’s koinonia as a gift from the Father through the grace of Jesus Christ.