In the Vicinity of the Righteous

Ziyāra and the Veneration of Muslim Saints in Late Medieval Egypt

Author: Christopher Schurman Taylor

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 431

A highly original and accessible study of Muslim saint veneration in medieval Egypt (1200-1500 AD). Exploring various meanings saints held for the contemporary imagination, it convincingly challenges the view of saint veneration as merely an expression of 'popular religion'.

In the Vicinity of the Righteous

Ziyāra and the Veneration of Muslim Saints in Late Medieval Egypt

Author: Taylor

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page:

View: 676

A highly original and accessible study of Muslim saint veneration in medieval Egypt (1200-1500 AD). Exploring various meanings saints held for the contemporary imagination, it convincingly challenges the view of saint veneration as merely an expression of 'popular religion'.

Muslim and Catholic Pilgrimage Practices

Explorations Through Java

Author: Albertus Bagus Laksana

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 270

View: 113

Exploring the distinctive nature and role of local pilgrimage traditions among Muslims and Catholics, Muslim and Catholic Pilgrimage Practices draws particularly on south central Java, Indonesia. In this area, the hybrid local Muslim pilgrimage culture is shaped by traditional Islam, the Javano-Islamic sultanates, and the Javanese culture with its strong Hindu-Buddhist heritage. This region is also home to a vibrant Catholic community whose identity formation has occurred in a way that involves complex engagements with Islam as well as Javanese culture. In this respect, local pilgrimage tradition presents itself as a rich milieu in which these complex engagements have been taking place between Islam, Catholicism, and Javanese culture. Employing a comparative theological and phenomenological analysis, this book reveals the deeper religio-cultural and theological import of pilgrimage practice in the identity formation and interaction among Muslims and Catholics in south central Java. In a wider context, it also sheds light on the larger dynamics of the complex encounter between Islam, Christianity and local cultures.

Altruism in World Religions

Author: Jacob Neusner

Publisher: Georgetown University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 216

View: 191

In 1830 philosopher Auguste Comte coined the term altruism to provide a general definition for the act of selflessly caring for others. But does this modern conception of sacrificing one's own interests for the well-being of others apply to the charitable behaviors encouraged by all world religions? In Altruism in World Religions prominent scholars from an array of religious perspectives probe the definition of altruism to determine whether it is a category that serves to advance the study of religion. Exploring a range of philosophical and religious thought from Greco-Roman philia to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, from Hinduism in India to Buddhism and the religions of China and Japan, the authors find that altruism becomes problematic when applied to religious studies because it is, in fact, a concept absent from religion. Chapters on Judaism, Christianity, and Islam reveal that followers of these religions cannot genuinely perform self-sacrificing acts because God has promised to reward every good deed. Moreover, the separation between the self and the other that self-sacrifice necessarily implies, runs counter to Buddhist thought, which makes no such distinction. By challenging our assumptions about the act of self-sacrifice as it relates to religious teachings, the authors have shown altruism to be more of a secular than religious notion. At the same time, their findings highlight how charitable acts operate with the values and structures of the religions studied.

The Canonization of al-Bukhārī and Muslim

The Formation and Function of the Sunnī Ḥadīth Canon

Author: Jonathan Brown

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 456

View: 954

Drawing on canon studies, this book investigates the origins, development and functions of the core of the Sunni ?ad?th canon, the 'Authentic' ?ad?th collections of al-Bukh?r? and Muslim, from the time of their authors to the modern period.

Revival from Below

The Deoband Movement and Global Islam

Author: Brannon D. Ingram

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 322

View: 613

The Deoband movement—a revivalist movement within Sunni Islam that quickly spread from colonial India to Pakistan, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and even the United Kingdom and South Africa—has been poorly understood and sometimes feared. Despite being one of the most influential Muslim revivalist movements of the last two centuries, Deoband’s connections to the Taliban have dominated the attention it has received from scholars and policy-makers alike. Revival from Below offers an important corrective, reorienting our understanding of Deoband around its global reach, which has profoundly shaped the movement’s history. In particular, the author tracks the origins of Deoband’s controversial critique of Sufism, how this critique travelled through Deobandi networks to South Africa, as well as the movement’s efforts to keep traditionally educated Islamic scholars (`ulama) at the center of Muslim public life. The result is a nuanced account of this global religious network that argues we cannot fully understand Deoband without understanding the complex modalities through which it spread beyond South Asia.

The Cult of Saints among Muslims and Jews in Medieval Syria

Author: Josef W. Meri

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 342

View: 736

This accessible study is the first critical investigation of the cult of saints among Muslims and Jews in medieval Syria and the Near East. Through case studies of saints and their devotees, discussion of the architecture of monuments, examination of devotional objects, and analysis of ideas of 'holiness', Meri depicts the practices of living religion and explores the common heritage of all three monotheistic faiths. Critical readings of a wide range of contemporary sources - travel writing, geographical works, pilgrimage guides, legal writings, historical sources, hagiography, and biography - reveal a vibrant religious culture in which the veneration of saints and pilgrimage to tombs and shrines were fundamental.

Timurids in Transition

Turko-Persian Politics and Acculturation in Medieval Iran

Author: Maria Subtelny

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 411

View: 552

Applying the Weberian concept of the routinization of charisma, the book examines the transformation of the nomadic empire of Tamerlane into a sedentary polity based on the Perso-Islamic model by focusing on the reign of the last Timurid ruler Sul n-?usain Bayqara in fifteenth-century Iran.

Marriage, Money and Divorce in Medieval Islamic Society

Author: Yossef Rapoport

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 233

High rates of divorce, often taken to be a modern and western phenomenon, were also typical of medieval Islamic societies. By pitting these high rates of divorce against the Islamic ideal of marriage,Yossef Rapoport radically challenges usual assumptions about the legal inferiority of Muslim women and their economic dependence on men. He argues that marriages in late medieval Cairo, Damascus and Jerusalem had little in common with the patriarchal models advocated by jurists and moralists. The transmission of dowries, women's access to waged labour, and the strict separation of property between spouses made divorce easy and normative, initiated by wives as often as by their husbands. This carefully researched work of social history is interwoven with intimate accounts of individual medieval lives, making for a truly compelling read. It will be of interest to scholars of all disciplines concerned with the history of women and gender in Islam.