Bees and Honey

Or, The Management of an Apiary for Pleasure and Profit

Author: Thomas Gabriel Newman

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bee culture

Page: 158

View: 964

The World History of Beekeeping and Honey Hunting

Author: Ethel Eva Crane

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 720

View: 691

This definitive work by world-renowned bee authority Eva Crane offers a fascinating account of bees and their complex relations with both humans and animals. Comprehensive, absorbing, and lavishly illustrated, this scholarly, yet accessible volume explores how bees, honey and other bee products have been gathered and utilized throughout the world. Beginning with the rock paintings of the Mesolithic cave dwellers, readers will learn about the variety of methods used by human beekeepers, the stratagems used by animal honey-hunters, and the multitude of products humans have derived from bees. The first in-depth book on the subject, the World History of Beekeeping and Honey-Hunting is the ultimate work on bees for scholars in biology and the life sciences, professional and amateur beekeepers, and anyone who is interested in bees or the collection of honey.

Asian Beekeeping in the 21st Century

Author: Panuwan Chantawannakul

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 325

View: 944

From the perspective of local scientists, this book provides insight into bees and bee management of Asia, with a special focus on honey bees. Asia is home to at least nine honey bee species, including the introduced European honey bee, Apis mellifera. Although A. mellifera and the native Asian honey bee, Apis cerana, are the most commonly employed species for commercial beekeeping, the remaining non-managed native honey bee species have important ecological and economic roles on the continent. Species distributions of most honey bee species overlap in Southeast Asia, thus promoting the potential for interspecies transmission of pests and parasites, as well as their spread to other parts of the world by human translocation. Losses of managed A. mellifera colonies is of great concern around the world, including in Asia. Such global colony losses are believed to be caused, in part, by pests and parasites originating from Asia such as the mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, and several bee viruses. Taking advantage of the experience of leading regional bee researchers, this book provides insight into the current situation of bees and bee management in Asia. Recent introductions of honey bee parasites of Asian origin to other parts of the world ensures that the contents of this book are broadly relevant to bee scientists, researchers, government offi cials, and the general public around the world.

Directory of Important World Honey Sources

Author: Eva Crane

Publisher: Northern Bee Books

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 214

"Overzicht van botanische en algemene namen van 467 planten, die een bron vormen voor de produktie van honing, verdeeld in 452 nectar-producerende en 15 honingdauwproducerende planten. Van elke honing-bron worden details beschreven van: plant; economisch nut; bloeiperiode en nectar-(of honingdauw- )vorming; stuifmeel en honingproduktie; chemische samenstelling en fysische eigenschappen van de honing, inclusief smaak, reuk en structuur"--

American Bee Journal

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Bee culture

Page:

View: 861

Includes summarized reports of many bee-keeper associations.

Why Do Bees Buzz?

Fascinating Answers to Questions about Bees

Author: Elizabeth Evans

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 248

View: 625

Twenty-five thousand species of bees certainly create a loud buzz. Yet silence descended a few years ago when domesticated bee populations plummeted. Bees, in particular honey bees, are critical links in the vibrant chain that brings fruits, vegetables, and nuts to markets and dinner tables across the country. Farmers and scientists on the agricultural frontlines quickly realized the impact of this loss, but many others did not see this devastation. Why Do Bees Buzz? reports on the mysterious "colony collapse disorder" that has affected honey bee populations, as well as other captivating topics, such as their complex, highly social lives, and how other species of bees are unique and different from honey bees. Organized in chapters that cover everything from these provocative pollinators' basic biology to the aggressive nature of killer bees, this insightful question and answer guide provides a honeycomb of compelling facts. With clarity and depth, bee biologist Elizabeth Capaldi Evans and coauthor Carol A. Butler examine the lives of honey bees, as well as other species such as orchid bees, bumblebees, and stingless bees. Accessible to readers on every level, and including the latest research and theory for the more sophisticated reader, the authors reveal more than one hundred critical answers to questions about the lives of bees. Concepts about speciation, evolutionary adaptation and pollination, as well as historical details about topics such as Mayan beekeeping and the appearance of bees in rock art, are arranged in easy-to-follow sidebars that highlight the text. Color and black and white photographs and drawings enhance the beauty and usefulness of Why Do Bees Buzz?