Italian Cuisine

A Cultural History

Author: Alberto Capatti

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 348

View: 682

This magnificent new book demonstrates the development of a distinctive, unified culinary tradition throughout the Italian peninsula. Thematically organized and beautifully illustrated, Italian Cuisine is a rich history of the ingredients, dishes, techniques, and social customs behind the Italian food we know and love today.

Medieval Arab Cookery

Author: Arthur John Arberry

Publisher: Prospect Books (UK)

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 527

View: 757

"The French scholar, Maxime Rodinson's contributions are legendary, yet have only been seen in translation in Petits Propos Culinaires. We include those already published there, together with the text of his longest paper, 'Recherches sur les documents Arabes relatifs a la cuisine', translated by Barbara Yeomans. The American scholar Charles Perry has been entertaining participants at the Oxford Symposium with regular gleanings from his researches into medieval Arab cookery, and several of his papers are gathered here, together with a new study of fish recipes, and other items previously published in PPC. Subjects include grain foods of the early Turks, rotted condiments, cooking pots, and Kitab al-Tibakhah, a 15th-century cookery book. English study of the subject was first encouraged by Professor Arberry's translation of the 13th-century cookery book Kitab al-Tabikh, published in 1939 in the periodical Islamic Culture."

Why Italians Love to Talk About Food

A Journey Through Italy's Great Regional Cuisines, From the alps to Sicily

Author: Elena Kostioukovitch

Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 480

View: 864

Italians love to talk about food. The aroma of a simmering ragú, the bouquet of a local wine, the remembrance of a past meal: Italians discuss these details as naturally as we talk about politics or sports, and often with the same flared tempers. In Why Italians Love to Talk About Food, Elena Kostioukovitch explores the phenomenon that first struck her as a newcomer to Italy: the Italian "culinary code," or way of talking about food. Along the way, she captures the fierce local pride that gives Italian cuisine its remarkable diversity. To come to know Italian food is to discover the differences of taste, language, and attitude that separate a Sicilian from a Piedmontese or a Venetian from a Sardinian. Try tasting Piedmontese bagna cauda, then a Lombard cassoela, then lamb ala Romana: each is part of a unique culinary tradition. In this learned, charming, and entertaining narrative, Kostioukovitch takes us on a journey through one of the world's richest and most adored food cultures. Organized according to region and colorfully designed with illustrations, maps, menus, and glossaries, Why Italians Love to Talk About Food will allow any reader to become as versed in the ways of Italian cooking as the most seasoned of chefs. Food lovers, history buffs, and gourmands alike will savor this exceptional celebration of Italy's culinary gifts.

Library Bulletin

Author: Cornell University. Libraries

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 354

Food in Medieval Times

Author: Melitta Weiss Adamson

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 256

View: 185

New light is shed on everyday life in the Middle Ages in Great Britain and continental Europe through this unique survey of its food culture. Students and other readers will learn about the common foodstuffs available, how and what they cooked, ate, and drank, what the regional cuisines were like, how the different classes entertained and celebrated, and what restrictions they followed for health and faith reasons. Fascinating information is provided, such as on imitation food, kitchen humor, and medical ideas. Many period recipes and quotations flesh out the narrative. The book draws on a variety of period sources, including as literature, account books, cookbooks, religious texts, archaeology, and art. Food was a status symbol then, and sumptuary laws defined what a person of a certain class could eat--the ingredients and preparation of a dish and how it was eaten depended on a person's status, and most information is available on the upper crust rather than the masses. Equalizing factors might have been religious strictures and such diseases as the bubonic plague, all of which are detailed here.

Cheese, Pears, and History in a Proverb

In a Proverb

Author: Massimo Montanari

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 176

View: 356

"Do not let the peasant know how good cheese is with pears" goes the extremely well known yet hard to decipher saying. Intrigued by this proverb, which has endured since the Middle Ages, Massimo Montanari launches an adventurous history of its origins and utility. Perusing archival cookbooks, agricultural and dietary treatises, literary works, and anthologies of beloved proverbs, Montanari finds in the nobility's demanding palettes and delicate stomachs a deep love of cheese with pears from medieval times onward. At first, cheese and its visceral, earthy pleasures was treated as the food of Polyphemus, the uncivilized man-beast. The pear, on the other hand, became the symbol of ephemeral, luxuriant pleasure& mdash;the indulgence of the social elite. Joined together, cheese and pears embodied an exclusive savoir faire, especially as the notion of taste as a natural phenomenon evolved into a cultural attitude. Montanari's delectable history straddles the line between written and oral tradition, between economic and social relations, and it thrills in the vivid power of mental representation. He ultimately discovers that the ambiguous proverb, so wrapped up in history, is not a repository of shared wisdom but a rich locus of social conflict.

Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well

Author: Pellegrino Artusi

Publisher: University of Toronto Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 653

View: 627

First published in 1891, Pellegrino Artusi's La scienza in cucina e l'arte di mangier bene has come to be recognized as the most significant Italian cookbook of modern times. It was reprinted thirteen times and had sold more than 52,000 copies in the years before Artusi's death in 1910, with the number of recipes growing from 475 to 790. And while this figure has not changed, the book has consistently remained in print. Although Artusi was himself of the upper classes and it was doubtful he had ever touched a kitchen utensil or lit a fire under a pot, he wrote the book not for professional chefs, as was the nineteenth-century custom, but for middle-class family cooks: housewives and their domestic helpers. His tone is that of a friendly advisor – humorous and nonchalant. He indulges in witty anecdotes about many of the recipes, describing his experiences and the historical relevance of particular dishes. Artusi's masterpiece is not merely a popular cookbook; it is a landmark work in Italian culture. This English edition (first published by Marsilio Publishers in 1997) features a delightful introduction by Luigi Ballerini that traces the fascinating history of the book and explains its importance in the context of Italian history and politics. The illustrations are by the noted Italian artist Giuliano Della Casa.

Italica

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Italian language

Page:

View: 872

"Bibliography of Italian studies in America" in each number, 1924-48.

All Manners of Food

Eating and Taste in England and France from the Middle Ages to the Present

Author: Stephen Mennell

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 397

View: 290

So close geographically, how could France and England be so enormously far apart gastronomically? Not just in different recipes and ways of cooking, but in their underlying attitudes toward the enjoyment of eating and its place in social life. In a new afterword that draws the United States and other European countries into the food fight, Stephen Mennell also addresses the rise of Asian influence and "multicultural" cuisine. All Manners of Food debunks long-standing myths and provides a wealth of information. It is a sweeping look at how social and political development has helped to shape different culinary cultures. Food and almost everything to do with food - fasting and gluttony, cookbooks, women's magazines, chefs and cooks, types of foods, the influential difference between "court" and "country" food - are comprehensively explored and tastefully presented in a dish that will linger in the memory long after the plates have been cleared.

Encyclopedia of Pasta

Author: Oretta Zanini De Vita

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 400

View: 649

Spaghetti, gnocchi, tagliatellea, ravioli, vincisgrassi, strascinati—pasta in its myriad forms has been a staple of the Mediterranean diet longer than bread. This beautiful volume is the first book to provide a complete history of pasta in Italy, telling its long story via the extravagant variety of shapes it takes and the even greater abundance of names by which it is known. Food scholar Oretta Zanini De Vita traveled to every corner of her native Italy, recording oral histories, delving into long-forgotten family cookbooks, and searching obscure archives to produce this rich and uniquely personal compendium of historical and geographical information. For each entry she includes the primary ingredients, preparation techniques, variant names, and the locality where it is made and eaten. Along the way, Zanini De Vita debunks such culinary myths as Marco Polo's supposed role in pasta's story even as she serves up a feast of new information. Encyclopedia of Pasta, illustrated throughout with original drawings by Luciana Marini, will be the standard reference on one of the world's favorite foods for many years to come, engaging and delighting both general readers and food professionals.

Gastronomical and Culinary Literature

A Survey and Analysis of Historically Oriented Collections in the U.S.A.

Author: Barbara L. Feret

Publisher: Metuchen, N.J. : Scarecrow Press

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 124

View: 222

PPC

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page:

View: 285

A Matter of Taste

A Bibliographical Catalogue of International Books on Food and Drink in the Lilly Library, Indiana University

Author: William Rea Cagle

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 991

View: 379

Offers a bibliography of the famed international collection of books on food and drink housed in The Lilly Library at Indiana University. The collection concentrates on rare European cook books from the 15th to the 20th centuries, but also contains works of Canada, Mexico, India, and Japan. Unlike m

Libellus de Arte Coquinaria

An Early Northern Cookery Book

Author: Rudolf Grewe

Publisher: Mrts

ISBN:

Category: Cooking

Page: 158

View: 915

One of the oldest known collections of European culinary recipes in a vernacular language is extant in four slightly different versions in Old Danish, Icelandic, and Low German. The manuscripts of 35 recipes dates not later than the end of the 13th century, but clearly goes back to an original perhaps as early as the 12th. Each of the four is prese