The Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow

Author: Jerome K. Jerome

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Philosophy

Page: 267

View: 378

This early work by Jerome K. Jerome was originally published in 1898 and we are now republishing it with a brand new introductory biography. 'The Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow' is a collection of humorous essays with a philosophical tone about the value of things and the decisions we make. Jerome Klapka Jerome was born in Walsall, England in 1859. Both his parents died while he was in his early teens, and he was forced to quit school to support himself. In 1889, Jerome published his most successful and best-remembered work, 'Three Men in a Boat'. Featuring himself and two of his friends encountering humorous situations while floating down the Thames in a small boat, the book was an instant success, and has never been out of print. In fact, its popularity was such that the number of registered Thames boats went up fifty percent in the year following its publication.

The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow

Author: Jerome Jerome

Publisher: Litres

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page:

View: 913

"Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow" is a collection of humorous and entertaining essays written by popular English humorist Jerome K. Jerome. It was the author’s second published book and it helped establish him as a leading English humorist.

Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow

Author: Jerome K. Jerome

Publisher: Mondial

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 104

View: 465

Humor in essay format: Jerome Klapka Jerome (1859-1927) was an English author known for his humorous essays. "What readers ask nowadays in a book is that it should improve, instruct, and elevate. This book wouldn't elevate a cow. I cannot conscientiously recommend it for any useful purposes whatever. All I can suggest is that when you get tired of reading 'the best hundred books,' you may take this up for half an hour. It will be a change." (from the Preface to "Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow by Jerome Jerome)

Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow Jerome Klapka Jerome

Author: Jerome K. Jerome

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 92

View: 913

Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, published in 1886, is a collection of humorous essays by Jerome K. Jerome. It was the author's second published book and it helped establish him as a leading English humorist. While widely considered one of Jerome's better works, and in spite of using the same style as Three Men in a Boat, it was never as popular as the latter. A second "Idle Thoughts" book, The Second Thoughts of An Idle Fellow, was published in 1898.

Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow By: Jerome K. Jerome

Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, Published in 1886, Is a Collection of Humorous Essays by Jerome K. Jerome

Author: Jerome K. Jerome

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 72

View: 142

Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, published in 1886, is a collection of humorous essays by Jerome K. Jerome. It was the author's second published book and it helped establish him as a leading English humorist. While widely considered one of Jerome's better works, and in spite of using the same style as Three Men in a Boat, it was never as popular as the latter. A second "Idle Thoughts" book, The Second Thoughts of An Idle Fellow, was published in 1898. The essays had previously appeared in Home Chimes, the same magazine that later serialised Jerome's Three Men in a Boat. Jerome Klapka Jerome (2 May 1859 - 14 June 1927) was an English writer and humourist, best known for the comic travelogue Three Men in a Boat (1887). Other works include the essay collections Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1886) and Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow; Three Men on the Bummel, a sequel to Three Men in a Boat, and several other novels. Early life: Jerome was born in Caldmore, Walsall, England. He was the fourth child of Marguerite Jones and Jerome Clapp (who later renamed himself Jerome Clapp Jerome), an ironmonger and lay preacher who dabbled in architecture. He had two sisters, Paulina and Blandina, and one brother, Milton, who died at an early age. Jerome was registered as Jerome Clapp Jerome, like his father's amended name, and the Klapka appears to be a later variation (after the exiled Hungarian general Gyorgy Klapka). The family fell into poverty owing to bad investments in the local mining industry, and debt collectors visited often, an experience that Jerome described vividly in his autobiography My Life and Times (1926).[1] The young Jerome attended St Marylebone Grammar School. He wished to go into politics or be a man of letters, but the death of his father when Jerome was 13 and of his mother when he was 15 forced him to quit his studies and find work to support himself. He was employed at the London and North Western Railway, initially collecting coal that fell along the railway, and he remained there for four years....

The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow - The Original Classic Edition

Author:

Publisher: Tebbo

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 50

View: 411

Finally available, a high quality book of the original classic edition of The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow. It was previously published by other bona fide publishers, and is now, after many years, back in print. This is a new and freshly published edition of this culturally important work by Jerome K. Jerome, which is now, at last, again available to you. Enjoy this classic work today. These selected paragraphs distill the contents and give you a quick look inside The Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow: The gentleman who, when I was young, bathed me at wisdom's font for nine guineas a term-no extras-used to say he never knew a boy who could do less work in more time; and I remember my poor grandmother once incidentally observing, in the course of an instruction upon the use of the Prayer-book, that it was highly improbable that I should ever do much that I ought not to do, but that she felt convinced beyond a doubt that I should leave undone pretty well everything that I ought to do. ...If, by any extraordinary chance, there was no war going, then they got up a deadly family feud with the next-door neighbor, and if, in spite of this, they still had a few spare moments on their hands, they occupied them with discussions as to whose sweetheart was the best looking, the arguments employed on both sides being battle-axes, clubs, etc. ... But if the other fellow broke his head-not his own, you know, but the other fellow's-the other fellow to the second fellow, that is, because of course the other fellow would only be the other fellow to him, not the first fellow who-well, if he broke his head, then his girl-not the other fellow's, but the fellow who was the-Look here, if A broke B's head, then A's girl was a pretty girl; but if B broke A's head, then A's girl wasn't a pretty girl, but B's girl was. ...I am looking forward to the time when we men shall have nothing to do but lie in bed till twelve, read two novels a day, have nice little five-o'clock teas all to ourselves, and tax our brains with nothing more trying than discussions upon the latest patterns in trousers and arguments as to what Mr. ...Many dear old ladies who daily look at tiny shoes lying in lavender-scented drawers, and weep as they think of the tiny feet whose toddling march is done, and sweet-faced young ones who place each night beneath their pillow some lock that once curled on a boyish head that the salt waves have kissed to death, will call me a nasty cynical brute and say I'm talking nonsense; but I believe, nevertheless, that if they will ask themselves truthfully whether they find it unpleasant to dwell thus on their sorrow, they will be compelled to answer 'No.'