Ida: A Sword Among Lions

Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against Lynching

Author: Paula J. Giddings

Publisher: Harper Collins

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 832

View: 982

In the tradition of towering biographies that tell us as much about America as they do about their subject, Ida: A Sword Among Lions is a sweepingnarrative about a country and a crusader embroiled in the struggle against lynching: a practice that imperiled not only the lives of blackmen and women, but also a nation based on law and riven by race. At the center of the national drama is Ida B. Wells (1862-1931), born to slaves in Mississippi, who began her activist career by refusing to leave a first-class ladies’ car on a Memphis railway and rose to lead the nation’s firstcampaign against lynching. For Wells the key to the rise in violence was embedded in attitudes not only about black men but about women and sexuality as well. Her independent perspective and percussive personality gained her encomiums as a hero -- as well as aspersions on her character and threats of death. Exiled from the South by 1892, Wells subsequently took her campaign across the country and throughout the British Isles before she married and settled in Chicago, where she continued her activism as a journalist, suffragist, and independent candidate in the rough-and-tumble world of the Windy City’s politics. In this eagerly awaited biography by Paula J. Giddings, author of the groundbreaking book When and Where I Enter, which traced the activisthistory of black women in America, the irrepressible personality of Ida B. Wells surges out of the pages. With meticulous research and vivid rendering of her subject, Giddings also provides compelling portraits of twentieth-century progressive luminaries, black and white, with whom Wells worked during some of the most tumultuous periods in American history. Embattled all of her activist life, Wells found herself fighting not only conservative adversaries but icons of the civil rights and women’s suffrage movements who sought to undermine her place in history. In this definitive biography, which places Ida B. Wells firmly in the context of her times as well as ours, Giddings at long last gives this visionary reformer her due and, in the process, sheds light on an aspect of our history that isoften left in the shadows.

Political Pioneer of the Press

Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Her Transnational Crusade for Social Justice

Author: Lori Amber Roessner

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 244

View: 875

Until the 1970s, Ida B. Wells-Barnett (1862–1931)—like so many prominent women in journalism and politics—was a forgotten figure in American culture. This edited volume takes a fresh look at this daring African-American woman who tirelessly advocated for the rights of women, minorities, and members of the working class.

The Light of Truth

Writings of an Anti-Lynching Crusader

Author: Ida B. Wells

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 360

The broadest and most comprehensive collection of writings available by an early civil and women’s rights pioneer Seventy-one years before Rosa Parks’s courageous act of resistance, police dragged a young black journalist named Ida B. Wells off a train for refusing to give up her seat. The experience shaped Wells’s career, and—when hate crimes touched her life personally—she mounted what was to become her life’s work: an anti-lynching crusade that captured international attention. This volume covers the entire scope of Wells’s remarkable career, collecting her early writings, articles exposing the horrors of lynching, essays from her travels abroad, and her later journalism. The Light of Truth is both an invaluable resource for study and a testament to Wells’s long career as a civil rights activist. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

A History of African-American Leadership

Author: John White

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 408

View: 774

The story of black emancipation is one of the most dramatic themes of American history, covering racism, murder, poverty and extreme heroism. Figures such as Malcolm X and Martin Luther King are the demigods of the freedom movements, both film and household figures. This major text explores the African-American experience of the twentieth century with particular reference to six outstanding race leaders. Their philosophies and strategies for racial advancement are compared and set against the historical framework and constraints within which they functioned. The book also examines the 'grass roots' of black protest movements in America, paying particular attention to the major civil rights organizations as well as black separatist groups such as the Nation of Islam.

A Companion to Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover

Author: Katherine A.S. Sibley

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 616

View: 274

With the analysis of the best scholars on this era, 29 essaysdemonstrate how academics then and now have addressed thepolitical, economic, diplomatic, cultural, ethnic, and socialhistory of the presidents of the Republican Era of 1921-1933 -Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover. This is the first historiographical treatment of along-neglected period, ranging from early treatments to the mostrecent scholarship Features review essays on the era, including the legacy ofprogressivism in an age of “normalcy”, the history ofAmerican foreign relations after World War I, and race relations inthe 1920s, as well as coverage of the three presidential electionsand a thorough treatment of the causes and consequences of theGreat Depression An introduction by the editor provides an overview of theissues, background and historical problems of the time, and thepersonalities at play

River of Hope

Black Politics and the Memphis Freedom Movement, 1865--1954

Author: Elizabeth Gritter

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 380

View: 904

One of the largest southern cities and a hub for the cotton industry, Memphis, Tennessee, was at the forefront of black political empowerment during the Jim Crow era. Compared to other cities in the South, Memphis had an unusually large number of African American voters. Black Memphians sought reform at the ballot box, formed clubs, ran for office, and engaged in voter registration and education activities from the end of the Civil War through the Brown v. Board of Education decision of 1954. In this groundbreaking book, Elizabeth Gritter examines how and why black Memphians mobilized politically in the period between Reconstruction and the beginning of the civil rights movement. Gritter illuminates, in particular, the efforts and influence of Robert R. Church Jr., an affluent Republican and founder of the Lincoln League, and the notorious Memphis political boss Edward H. Crump. Using these two men as lenses through which to view African American political engagement, this volume explores how black voters and their leaders both worked with and opposed the white political machine at the ballot box. River of Hope challenges persisting notions of a "Solid South" of white Democratic control by arguing that the small but significant number of black southerners who retained the right to vote had more influence than scholars have heretofore assumed. Gritter's nuanced study presents a fascinating view of the complex nature of political power during the Jim Crow era and provides fresh insight into the efforts of the individuals who laid the foundation for civil rights victories in the 1950s and '60s.

Carolina Israelite

How Harry Golden Made Us Care about Jews, the South, and Civil Rights

Author: Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 368

View: 240

This first comprehensive biography of Jewish American writer and humorist Harry Golden (1903-1981)--author of the 1958 national best-seller Only in America--illuminates a remarkable life intertwined with the rise of the civil rights movement, Jewish popular culture, and the sometimes precarious position of Jews in the South and across America during the 1950s. After recounting Golden's childhood on New York's Lower East Side, Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett points to his stint in prison as a young man, after a widely publicized conviction for investment fraud during the Great Depression, as the root of his empathy for the underdog in any story. During World War II, the cigar-smoking, bourbon-loving raconteur landed in Charlotte, North Carolina, and founded the Carolina Israelite newspaper, which was published into the 1960s. Golden's writings on race relations and equal rights attracted a huge popular readership. Golden used his celebrity to editorialize for civil rights as the momentous story unfolded. He charmed his way into friendships and lively correspondence with Carl Sandburg, Adlai Stevenson, Robert Kennedy, and Billy Graham, among other notable Americans, and he appeared on the Tonight Show as well as other national television programs. Hartnett's spirited chronicle captures Golden's message of social inclusion for a new audience today.

Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women

Author: Mia E. Bay

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 320

View: 263

Despite recent advances in the study of black thought, black women intellectuals remain often neglected. This collection of essays by fifteen scholars of history and literature establishes black women's places in intellectual history by engaging the work of writers, educators, activists, religious leaders, and social reformers in the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean. Dedicated to recovering the contributions of thinkers marginalized by both their race and their gender, these essays uncover the work of unconventional intellectuals, both formally educated and self-taught, and explore the broad community of ideas in which their work participated. The end result is a field-defining and innovative volume that addresses topics ranging from religion and slavery to the politicized and gendered reappraisal of the black female body in contemporary culture. Contributors are Mia E. Bay, Judith Byfield, Alexandra Cornelius, Thadious Davis, Corinne T. Field, Arlette Frund, Kaiama L. Glover, Farah J. Griffin, Martha S. Jones, Natasha Lightfoot, Sherie Randolph, Barbara D. Savage, Jon Sensbach, Maboula Soumahoro, and Cheryl Wall.

Public Universities and the Public Sphere

Author: W. Smith

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 229

View: 373

Public Universities and the Public Sphere argues that two crises facing America - a crisis of public discourse and a crisis of public higher education - are closely connected. Part of the solution, Smith argues in this timely work, to both crises lies in understanding and building on the connection.