Humanizing the Narcissistic Style

Author: Stephen M. Johnson

Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 284

View: 733

Discusses the causes of the narcissistic character disorder and describes group and individual therapy methods for narcissism

Interventions in the narcissistic disorders

Author: Forrest Keel

Publisher: Forrest Keel

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page:

View: 531

The so called ‘narcissistic personality disorder’ is a complex and often misunderstood disorder. The cardinal feature of the narcissistic personality is the grandiose sense of self importance, but paradoxically underneath this grandiosity the narcissist suffers from a chronically fragile low self esteem. The grandiosity of the narcissist, however, is often so pervasive that we tend to dehumanize him or her. The narcissist conjures in us images of the mythological character Narcissus who could only love himself, rebuffing anyone who attempted to touch him. Nevertheless, it is the underlying sense of inferiority which is the real problem of the narcissist, the grandiosity is just a facade used to cover the deep feelings of inadequacy. In this book we will talk about The Makeup of the Narcissistic Personality, The Therapeutic Essence of Treating Narcissism, Differential Psychological Views of Narcissism and much more.

Stop Caretaking the Borderline Or Narcissist

How to End the Drama and Get on with Life

Author: Margalis Fjelstad

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 219

View: 802

People with Borderline or Narcissistic Personality Disorders are master manipulators; Caretakers fall for them every time. This book helps Caretakers break the cycle and puts them on a new path of personal freedom, discovery, and self-awareness, through the use of real stories and practical suggestions from a seasoned therapist.

Bipolar Expeditions

Mania and Depression in American Culture

Author: Emily Martin

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 118

Manic behavior holds an undeniable fascination in American culture today. It fuels the plots of best-selling novels and the imagery of MTV videos, is acknowledged as the driving force for successful entrepreneurs like Ted Turner, and is celebrated as the source of the creativity of artists like Vincent Van Gogh and movie stars like Robin Williams. Bipolar Expeditions seeks to understand mania's appeal and how it weighs on the lives of Americans diagnosed with manic depression. Anthropologist Emily Martin guides us into the fascinating and sometimes disturbing worlds of mental-health support groups, mood charts, psychiatric rounds, the pharmaceutical industry, and psychotropic drugs. Charting how these worlds intersect with the wider popular culture, she reveals how people living under the description of bipolar disorder are often denied the status of being fully human, even while contemporary America exhibits a powerful affinity for manic behavior. Mania, Martin shows, has come to be regarded as a distant frontier that invites exploration because it seems to offer fame and profits to pioneers, while depression is imagined as something that should be eliminated altogether with the help of drugs. Bipolar Expeditions argues that mania and depression have a cultural life outside the confines of diagnosis, that the experiences of people living with bipolar disorder belong fully to the human condition, and that even the most so-called rational everyday practices are intertwined with irrational ones. Martin's own experience with bipolar disorder informs her analysis and lends a personal perspective to this complex story. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

New Directions in Gestalt Group Therapy

Relational Ground, Authentic Self

Author: Peter H. Cole

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 184

View: 144

Gestalt therapists often work with groups. Group therapists from a variety of theoretical orientations frequently incorporate insights and methodology from gestalt therapy. New Directions in Gestalt Group Therapy: Relational Ground, Authentic Self was written with particular attention to both gestalt and group work specialists in providing a comprehensive reference for the practice of group therapy from a gestalt perspective. In includes an introduction to gestalt therapy terms and concepts written to make the gestalt approach understandable and accessible for mental health practitioners of all backgrounds. It is appropriate for students as well as seasoned psychotherapists. Peter Cole and Daisy Reese are the co-directors of the Sierra Institute for Contemporary Gestalt Therapy located in Berkeley, California. They are the co-authors of Mastering the Financial Dimension of Your Psychotherapy Practice and True Self, True Wealth: A Pathway to Prosperity. They are a married couple, with five children and four grandchildren between them.

Narcissism in High Fidelity

Author: Kristina Nelson

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 156

View: 471

The following study of narcissism in the leading character in a recent film, High Fidelity, nonetheless attempts without apology such a psychological analysis of a popular work of fiction. It is the argument of this study that, although High Fidelity is not necessarily high art or even a profoundly serious film, it does present, like much of the best popular art, an insightful and honest examination of a real modern dilemma: the difficulty of intimate relationships in a world where every emotion and every remark seems to have a pop culture reference or origin. This film presents, we will show, a complex and detailed portrait of a particular modern personality type, the narcissistic youth who turns into an overage Peter Pan incapable of commitment; more significantly, however, the film (and the book from which it was adapted) suggests a way out of this dilemma for the protagonist, who ultimately succeeds in overcoming his self-absorption.

Existential-Phenomenological Perspectives in Psychology

Exploring the Breadth of Human Experience

Author: Ronald S. Valle

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 355

View: 994

When I began to study psychology a half century ago, it was defined as "the study of behavior and experience." By the time I completed my doctorate, shortly after the end of World War II, the last two words were fading rapidly. In one of my first graduate classes, a course in statistics, the professor announced on the first day, "Whatever exists, exists in some number." We dutifully wrote that into our notes and did not pause to recognize that thereby all that makes life meaningful was being consigned to oblivion. This bland restructuring-perhaps more accurately, destruction-of the world was typical of its time, 1940. The influence of a narrow scientistic attitude was already spreading throughout the learned disciplines. In the next two decades it would invade and tyrannize the "social sciences," education, and even philosophy. To be sure, quantification is a powerful tool, selectively employed, but too often it has been made into an executioner's axe to deny actuality to all that does not yield to its procrustean demands.