Writing to the Point

A Complete Guide to Selling Fiction

Author: Algis Budrys

Publisher: Action Pub

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 63

View: 148

Complete concise guide to writing fiction that sells.Get a master's competitive edge in the writing business. Bestselling writer, editor and renown writing teacher Algis Budrys has distilled 50 years of success into "Writing to the Point."This is the book you need to be a better, and more successful, author.Write better stories. Fix mistakes in your present stories!Algis Budrys's Writing to The Point contains all the writing articles that appeared over the first ten issues of tomorrow Magazine, re-edited and expanded. It has an introduction by the author, and an appendix containing three separate essays: "Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy""Ideas, How They Work And How To Fix Them""What a Story Is."In this book you will find, in permanent form, everything an aspiring amateur needs to know in order to become a published author. Algis Budrys has taught hundreds of people at scores of workshops, and edited not only tomorrow Magazine but many books and other magazines. The methods he describes in Writing to The Point are methods that have worked repeatedly.

Writing Fiction For Dummies

Author: Randy Ingermanson

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Education

Page: 384

View: 830

A complete guide to writing and selling your novel So you want to write a novel? Great! That’s a worthy goal, no matter what your reason. But don’t settle for just writing a novel. Aim high. Write a novel that you intend to sell to a publisher. Writing Fiction for Dummies is a complete guide designed to coach you every step along the path from beginning writer to royalty-earning author. Here are some things you’ll learn in Writing Fiction for Dummies: Strategic Planning: Pinpoint where you are on the roadmap to publication; discover what every reader desperately wants from a story; home in on a marketable category; choose from among the four most common creative styles; and learn the self-management methods of professional writers. Writing Powerful Fiction: Construct a story world that rings true; create believable, unpredictable characters; build a strong plot with all six layers of complexity of a modern novel; and infuse it all with a strong theme. Self-Editing Your Novel: Psychoanalyze your characters to bring them fully to life; edit your story structure from the top down; fix broken scenes; and polish your action and dialogue. Finding An Agent and Getting Published: Write a query letter, a synopsis, and a proposal; pitch your work to agents and editors without fear. Writing Fiction For Dummies takes you from being a writer to being an author. It can happen—if you have the talent and persistence to do what you need to do.

How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II

Advanced Techniques For Dramatic Storytelling

Author: James N. Frey

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 176

View: 838

"Damn good" fiction is dramatic fiction, Frey insists, whether it is by Hemingway or Grisham, Le Carre or Ludlum, Austen or Dickens. Despite their differences, these authors' works share common elements: strong narrative lines, fascinating characters, steadily building conflicts, and satisfying conclusions. Frey's How to Write a Damn Good Novel is one of the most widely used guides ever published for aspiring authors. Here, in How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II, Frey offers powerful advanced techniques to build suspense, create fresher, more interesting characters, and achieve greater reader sympathy, empathy, and identification. How to Write a Damn Good Novel, II also warns against the pseudo-rules often inflicted upon writers, rules such as "The author must always be invisible" and "You must stick to a single viewpoint in a scene," which cramp the imagination and deaden the narrative. Frey focuses instead on promises that the author makes to the reader—promises about character, narrative voice, story type, and so on, which must be kept if the reader is to be satisfied. This book is rich, instructive, honest, and often tellingly funny about the way writers sometimes fail their readers and themselves.

How to Write Science Fiction & Fantasy

Author: Orson Scott Card

Publisher: Writer's Digest Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 140

View: 572

Learn to write science fiction and fantasy from a master You've always dreamed of writing science fiction and fantasy tales that pull readers into extraordinary new worlds and fantastic conflicts. Best-selling author Orson Scott Card shows you how it's done, distilling years of writing experience and publishing success into concise, no-nonsense advice. You'll learn how to: utilize story elements that define the science fiction and fantasy genres build, populate, and dramatize a credible, inviting world your readers will want to explore develop the "rules" of time, space and magic that affect your world and its inhabitants construct a compelling story by developing ideas, characters, and events that keep readers turning pages find the markets for speculative fiction, reach them, and get published submit queries, write cover letters, find an agent, and live the life of a writer The boundaries of your imagination are infinite. Explore them with Orson Scott Card and create fiction that casts a spell over agents, publishers, and readers from every world.

How to Write a Damn Good Thriller

A Step-by-Step Guide for Novelists and Screenwriters

Author: James N. Frey

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 306

View: 467

A quick look at any fiction bestseller list reveals that thrillers make up most of the titles at the top. HOW TO WRITE A DAMN GOOD THRILLER will help the aspiring novelist or screenwriter to design, draft, write, and polish a thriller that is sure to grab readers. Frey uses examples from both books and movies and addresses the following hot topics: *Germinal ideas *Breathing life into great thriller characters *Crafting a gripping opening *Maintaining tension *Creating obstacles and conflicts *Writing a mean, lean thriller scene *Adding surprise twists *Building a smashing climax and many more. In his trademark approachable and humorous style, Frey illuminates the building blocks of great thrillers and gives the reader the tools to write his or her own.

How to Write a Damn Good Novel

A Step-by-Step No Nonsense Guide to Dramatic Storytelling

Author: James N. Frey

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN:

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 174

View: 432

Covers characterization, plot, theme, conflicts, climax and resolution, point of view, dialogue, revision, and manuscript submission

HOW TO WRITE A BESTSELLING SELF-HELP BOOK

The 68 Fatal Mistakes You Should Avoid

Author: Jean Marie Stine

Publisher: A&T Books

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 150

View: 582

The "must have" book by the acknowledged expert for self-help/how-to business, recovery, sports, health, self-improvement, hobby, crafts, health, and New Age writers. "If you follow only a third of her advice, you'll have a successful book." Jeremy Tarcher. In this unique book, author-editor Jean Marie Stine shows writers how to avoid the errors that keep most self-help books from finding publishers and off the bestseller lists if they are published. From the author: "Before starting this book, I carefully reviewed stacks of rejected self-help manuscripts from aspiring authors. I also looked at first drafts which publishers had asked me to rewrite before they were deemed suitable for publication. I kept a running list of the defects I noted. Altogether, I found 68 key mistakes most inexperienced authors seemed to make. "In this book I describe each of the 68 key mistakes so that you can recognize them when you see them in your own work. Then I explain how you can avoid or correct the problem. The result should be a zero-defect manuscript and book proposal that will sail through the editorial and publishing committees to acceptance."

How to Write Killer Fiction

The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense

Author: Carolyn Wheat

Publisher: SCB Distributors

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 191

View: 574

Writing is all about creating an experience for the reader. Whether you're giving them a brain-teasing puzzle or an adrenaline-soaked emotional roller coaster-ride, this book helps you shape your fiction to create maximum enjoyment for your readers. Now you can learn the craft directly from one of the most respected contemporary writers in the field, Carolyn What, winner of multitudinous awards and nominations. What knows what editors want, and shows you how to achieve your writing an publishing goals. How To Write Killer Fiction is a handbook that no writer of mystery or suspense can afford to be without.

How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method

Author: Randy Ingermanson

Publisher: CreateSpace

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 234

View: 359

A Magical Key to Unlock Your Creative Wizard Are you writing a novel, but having trouble getting your first draft written? You've heard of “outlining,” but that sounds too rigid for you. You've heard of “organic writing,” but that seems a bit squishy to you. Take a look at the wildly popular Snowflake Method—ten battle-tested steps that jump-start your creativity and help you quickly map out your story. All around the world, novelists are using the Snowflake Method right now to ignite their imaginations and get their first drafts down. In this book, you'll follow the story of a fictitious novelist as she learns to tap into the amazing power of the Snowflake Method. Almost magically, she finds her story growing from a simple idea into a deep and powerful novel. And she finds her novel changing her—into a stronger, more courageous person. Zany, Over the Top, and Just Plain Fun How to Write a Novel Using the Snowflake Method is a “business parable”—a how-to guide written in story form. It's zany. It's over the top. It's just plain fun. It shows you how it's done, rather than tells you. You'll learn by example how to grow your story idea into a sizzling first draft. You'll discover: How to define your “target audience” the right way, so you know exactly how your ideal readers think and feel. Forget what the experts tell you about “demographics.” How to create a dynamite selling tool that will instantly tell people whether they'll love your story or hate it. And you want them to love it or hate it. How to get inside the skin of each of your characters—even your villain. Especially your villain. How to find a deep, emotively powerful theme for your story. Do you know the best point in your novel to unveil your theme? How to know when to backtrack, and why backtracking is essential to writing great fiction. How to fire-test each scene to ensure it's high-impact—before you write it. ExcerptGoldilocks had always wanted to write a novel. She learned to read before she went to kindergarten. In grade school, she always had her nose in a book. In junior high, the other kids thought she was weird, because she actually liked reading those dusty old novels in literature class. All through high school, Goldilocks dreamed of writing a book of her own someday. But when she went to college, her parents persuaded her to study something practical. Goldilocks hated practical, and secretly she kept reading novels. But she was a very obedient girl, so she did what her parents told her. She got a very practical degree in marketing. After college, she got a job that bored her to tears—but at least it was practical. Then she got married, and within a few years, she had two children, a girl and then a boy. She quit her job to devote full time to them. As the children grew, Goldilocks took great joy in introducing them to the stories she had loved as a child. When her son went off to kindergarten, Goldilocks thought about looking for a job. But her resume now had a seven-year hole in it, and her practical skills were long out of date. The only jobs Goldilocks could qualify for were minimum wage. She suddenly realized that being practical had made her horribly unhappy. On a whim, Goldilocks decided to do the one thing she had always wanted more than anything else—she was finally going to write a novel. She didn't care if it was impractical. She didn't care if nobody would ever read her novel. She was going to do it just because she wanted to. For the first time in years, she was going to do something just for herself. And nobody was going to stop her.