How to Read Towns and Cities

A Crash Course in Urban Architecture

Author: Jonathan Glancey

Publisher: Bloomsbury Visual Arts

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 256

View: 947

How to Read Towns & Cities is a pocket-sized primer to understanding the forces that have shaped the world's cities. It takes a practical, highly visual approach - showing us how to read the stories embedded in the fabric of the neighbourhoods, towns, and cities in which we live today. The fortunes of towns and cities rise and fall along with the fate of the civilisations to which they belong. Some are lost entirely, now no more than ruins; others have thrived as urban centres for millennia; and all contain vital clues embedded in their streets and skylines which reveal why their inhabitants grouped together, and tell of their unique social, political and cultural histories. Packed with plans, maps, and drawings, this book takes the reader on an international journey of discovery to explore the history of cities from our earliest urban origins to the contemporary world city - from Babylon to Beijing, London to Paris, and from the skyscrapers of New York to the streets of their own home town. A must-read for anyone interested in history, cities, and travel, this fascinating book turns the reader into urban detective to see how our towns and cities grew the way they are.

Close-Up

How to Read the American City

Author: Grady Clay

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 192

View: 806

"Grady Clay looks hard at the landscape, finding out who built what and why, noticing who participates in a city's success and who gets left in a 'sink,' or depressed (often literally) area. Clay doesn't stay in the city; he looks at industrial towns, truck stops, suburbs—nearly anywhere people live or work. His style is witty and readable, and the book is crammed with illustrations that clarify his points. If I had to pick up one book to guide my observations of the American scene, this would be it."—Sonia Simone, Whole Earth Review "The emphasis on the informal aspects of city-shaping—topographical, historical, economic and social—does much to counteract the formalist approach to American urban design. Close-Up...should be required reading for anyone wishing to understand Americans and their cities."—Roger Cunliffe, Architectural Review "Close-Up is a provocative and stimulating book."—Thomas J. Schlereth, Winterthur Portfolio "Within this coherent string of essays, the urban dweller or observer, as well as the student, will find refreshing strategies for viewing the environmental 'situations' interacting to form a landscape."—Dallas Morning News "Clay's Close-Up, first published in 1973, is still a key book for looking at the real American city. Too many urban books and guidebooks concentrate on the good parts of the city....Clay looks at all parts of the city, the suburbs, and the places between cities, and develops new terms to describe parts of the built environment—fronts, strips, beats, stacks, sinks, and turf. No one who wants to understand American cities or to describe them, should fail to know this book. The illustrations are of special interest to the guidebook writer."—American Urban Guidenotes

The Book of English Place Names

How Our Towns and Villages Got Their Names

Author: Caroline Taggart

Publisher: Random House

ISBN:

Category: Travel

Page: 304

View: 258

Take a journey down winding lanes and Roman roads in this witty and informative guide to the meanings behind the names of England's towns and villages. From Celtic farmers to Norman conquerors, right up to the Industrial Revolution, deciphering our place names reveals how generations of our ancestors lived, worked, travelled and worshipped, and how their influence has shaped our landscape. From the most ancient sacred sites to towns that take their names from stories of giants and knights, learn how Roman garrisons became our great cities, and discover how a meeting of the roads could become a thriving market town. Region by region, Caroline Taggart uncovers hidden meanings to reveal a patchwork of tall tales and ancient legends that collectively tells the story of how we made England.

Mapping Towns and Cities

Author: Holly Duhig

Publisher: Greenhaven Publishing LLC

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 32

View: 259

Maps are used to help guide us to where we want to go and to help us learn about new places. Readers learn how to utilize maps of towns and cities in this age-appropriate and accessible resource. They discover the value of learning how to read a map and gain confidence from practicing that essential life skill. In addition to the useful main text, detailed diagrams, interesting fact boxes, helpful graphic organizers, a full glossary, and vibrant, full-color examples of maps aid readers in understanding this important social studies curriculum topic.

How to Read a Map

Author: Melanie Waldron

Publisher: Raintree

ISBN:

Category: Map reading

Page: 32

View: 752

Maps are essential tools for understanding the world around us. Learning to read maps - both printed and online - is a core skill that forms the basis of social studies. This book explores the different types of features used on maps, explaining what they can show us and how to make sense of them.

How to Read the Bible

A Guide to Scripture, Then and Now

Author: James L. Kugel

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 848

View: 616

As soon as it appeared, How to Read the Bible was recognized as a masterwork, “awesome, thrilling” (The New York Times), “wonderfully interesting, extremely well presented” (The Washington Post), and “a tour de force...a stunning narrative” (Publishers Weekly). Now in its tenth year of publication, the book remains the clearest, most inviting and readable guide to the Hebrew Bible around—and a profound meditation on the effect that modern biblical scholarship has had on traditional belief. Moving chapter by chapter, Harvard professor James Kugel covers the Bible’s most significant stories—the Creation of the world, Adam and Eve, Cain and Abel, Noah and the flood, Abraham and Sarah, Jacob and his wives, Moses and the exodus, David’s mighty kingdom, plus the writings of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and the other prophets, and on to the Babylonian conquest and the eventual return to Zion. Throughout, Kugel contrasts the way modern scholars understand these events with the way Christians and Jews have traditionally understood them. The latter is not, Kugel shows, a naïve reading; rather, it is the product of a school of sophisticated interpreters who flourished toward the end of the biblical period. These highly ideological readers sought to put their own spin on texts that had been around for centuries, utterly transforming them in the process. Their interpretations became what the Bible meant for centuries and centuries—until modern scholarship came along. The question that this book ultimately asks is: What now? As one reviewer wrote, Kugel’s answer provides “a contemporary model of how to read Sacred Scripture amidst the oppositional pulls of modern scholarship and tradition.”

The Making of Urban America

A History of City Planning in the United States

Author: John William Reps

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 574

View: 612

This comprehensive survey of urban growth in America has become a standard work in the field. From the early colonial period to the First World War, John Reps explores to what extent city planning has been rooted in the nation's tradition, showing the extent of European influence on early communities. Illustrated by over three hundred reproductions of maps, plans, and panoramic views, this book presents hundreds of American cities and the unique factors affecting their development.

How to Read Texts

A Student Guide to Critical Approaches and Skills

Author: Neil McCaw

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 192

View: 286

Now in its second edition, How to Read Texts introduces students to key critical approaches to literary texts and offers a practical introduction for students developing their own critical and close-reading skills. Written in a lively, jargon-free style, it explains critical concepts, approaches and ideas including: - Debates around critical theory - The role of history and context - The links between creativity and criticism - The relationship between author, reader and text. The new edition now includes guidance on analysing a range of multi-media texts, including film and online media as well as the purely literary. In addition to new practical examples, readings, exercises and 'checkpoints' that help students to build confidence in their own critical readings of both primary and secondary texts, the book now also offers guidance on writing fully-formed critical essays and tips for independent research. Comprehensively updated and revised throughout, How to Read Texts is an indispensible guide for students making the transition to university study.

Amalia

Author: José Mármol

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 704

View: 452

Amalia is one of the most popular Latin American novels and, until recently, was required reading in Argentina's schools. It was written to protest the dictatorship of Juan Manuel de Rosas and to provide a picture of the political events during his regime, but the book's popularity stemmed from the love story that fuels the plot. Originally published in 1851 in serial form, Marmol's novel recounts the story of Eduardo and Amalia, who fall in love while he is hiding in her home. Amalia and her cousin Daniel protect him from Rosist persecution, but before the couple and the cousin can escape to safety, they are discovered by the death squad and the young men die. Similar in style to the romantic novels of Walter Scott, Amalia provides a detailed picture of life under a dictatorship combined with lively dialogue, drama, and a tragic love story.

Tourism Marketing for Cities and Towns

Using Social Media and Branding to Attract Tourists

Author: Bonita Kolb

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 246

View: 592

Understanding how places, particularly cities and towns, are marketed to and consumed by tourists, is vital to anyone working in the tourism industry. By creating and promoting a unique branded destination, the successful marketer can attract new visitors to their city or tourism attraction. With the rise of social media, there is even more scope to explore how tourism marketers can use their own and other social media sites to communicate with today’s tech connected traveler. In a new updated volume, Tourism Marketing for Cities and Towns provides thorough and succinct coverage of place marketing theory specific to the tourism industry. It focuses on clearly explaining how to develop the branded destination with special emphasis on product analysis, promoting authenticity and, new to this edition, the use of social media to create the personalized experiences desired by visitors. In addition, it contains a wide range of international examples and perspectives from a large variety of different stakeholders, alongside discussion questions and strategic planning worksheets. This book provides both practical advice with real-world application and a theoretical background to the field as a whole. Written in an engaging style, this book will be valuable reading for upper level students and business practitioners of Tourism, Marketing, Urban Studies, Business Management and Leisure Studies.

The Power of Maps

Author: Denis Wood

Publisher: Guilford Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 248

View: 252

This volume ventures into terrain where even the most sophisticated map fails to lead--through the mapmaker's bias. Denis Wood shows how maps are not impartial reference objects, but rather instruments of communication, persuasion, and power. Like paintings, they express a point of view. By connecting us to a reality that could not exist in the absence of maps--a world of property lines and voting rights, taxation districts and enterprise zones--they embody and project the interests of their creators. Sampling the scope of maps available today, illustrations include Peter Gould's AIDS map, Tom Van Sant's map of the earth, U.S. Geological Survey maps, and a child's drawing of the world. THE POWER OF MAPS was published in conjunction with an exhibition at the Cooper Hewitt Museum, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Design.

Founders

The People Who Brought You a Nation

Author: Ray Raphael

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 304

Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Hamilton, Adams, and Madison—together they are best known as an intimate cadre of daring, brilliant men credited with our nation’s founding. But does this group tell the whole story? In his widely praised new history of the roots of American patriotism, celebrated author Ray Raphael expands the historical canvas to reveal an entire generation of patriots who pushed for independence, fought a war, and set the United States on its course—giving us “an evangelizing introduction to the American Revolution” (Booklist) . Called “entertaining yet informative” by Library Journal , Founders brings to life seven historical figures whose stories anchor a sweeping yet intimate history of the Founding Era, from the beginnings of unrest in 1761 through the passage of the Bill of Rights thirty years later. Here we follow the intertwined lives of George Washington and a private soldier in his army. America’s richest merchant, who rescued the nation from bankruptcy, goes head to head with a peripatetic revolutionary who incited rebellion in seven states. Rounding out the company is a richly nuanced cast that includes a common village blacksmith, a conservative slave owner with an abolitionist son, and Mercy Otis Warren, the most politically engaged woman of the time. A master narrative with unprecedented historical scope, Founders will forever change our image of this most crucial moment in America’s past.

The Jungle

Author: Upton Sinclair

Publisher: OUP USA

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 384

View: 877

A searing novel of social realism, Upton Sinclair's The Jungle follows the fortunes of Jurgis Rudkus, an immigrant who finds in the stockyards of turn-of-the-century Chicago a ruthless system that degrades and impoverishes him, and an industry whose filthy practices contaminate the meat it processes. From the stench of the killing-beds to the horrors of the fertilizer-works, the appalling conditions in which Jurgis works are described in intense detail by an author bent on social reform. So powerful was the book's message that it caught the eye of President Theodore Roosevelt and led to changes to the food hygiene laws. In his Introduction to this new edition, Russ Castronovo highlights the aesthetic concerns that were central to Sinclair's aspirations, examining the relationship between history and historical fiction, and between the documentary impulse and literary narrative. As he examines the book's disputed status as novel (it is propaganda or literature?), he reveals why Sinclair's message-driven fiction has relevance to literary and historical matters today, now more than a hundred years after the novel first appeared in print.

The Talmud

A Selection

Author:

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 896

View: 474

The Talmud is one of the most significant religious texts in the world, second only to the Bible in its importance to Judaism. As the Bible is the word of God, The Talmud applies that word to the lives of its followers. In a range of styles including commentary, parables, proverbs and anecdotes, it provides guidance on all aspects of everyday life from ownership to commerce to relationships. This selection of its most illuminating passages makes accessible the centuries of Jewish thought within The Talmud. Norman Solomon's clear translation from the Bavli (Babylonian) Talmud is accompanied by an introduction on its arrangement, social and historical background, reception and authors. This edition also includes appendixes of background information, a glossary, time line, maps and indexes.

How Cities Work

Suburbs, Sprawl, and the Roads Not Taken

Author: Alex Marshall

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Political Science

Page: 243

View: 422

The author explores "the decentralized spread of California's Silicon Valley, the crowded streets of New York City's Jackson Heights neighborhood, the controlled growth of Portland, Oregon, and the stage-set facades of Disney's planned community, Celebration, Florida," and argues that the real forces of shaping cities--transportation systems, industry and business, and political decision making--have been ignored.--Cover.

The Regional City

Author: Peter Calthorpe

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 328

View: 755

Most Americans today do not live in discrete cities and towns, but rather in an aggregation of cities and suburbs that forms one basic economic, multi-cultural, environmental and civic entity. These "regional cities” have the potential to significantly improve the quality of our lives--to provide interconnected and diverse economic centers, transportation choices, and a variety of human-scale communities. In The Regional City, two of the most innovative thinkers in the field of land use planning and design offer a detailed look at this new metropolitan form and explain how regional-scale planning and design can help direct growth wisely and reverse current trends in land use. The authors: •discuss the nature and underpinnings of this new metropolitan form •present their view of the policies and physical design principles required for metropolitan areas to transform themselves into regional cities •document the combination of physical design and social and economic policies that are being used across the country •consider the main factors that are shaping metropolitan regions today, including the maturation of sprawling suburbs and the renewal of urban neighborhoods Featuring full-color graphics and in-depth case studies, The Regional City offers a thorough examination of the concept of regional planning along with examples of successful initiatives from around the country. It will be must reading for planners, architects, landscape architects, local officials, real estate developers, community development professionals, and for students in architecture, urban planning, and policy.

Cities

Author: John Reader

Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 384

View: 973

In Cities, the acclaimed historian John Reader takes us on a journey of the city—from its earliest example in the Ancient Near East to today’s teeming centers of compressed existence, such as Mumbai and Tokyo. Cities are home to half the planet’s population and consume nearly three-quarters of its natural resources. For Reader, they are our most natural artifacts, the civic spirit of our collective ingenuity. He gives us the ecological and functional context of how cities evolved throughout human history—the connection between pottery making and childbirth in ancient Anatolia, plumbing and politics in ancient Rome, and revolution and street planning in nineteenth-century Paris. This illuminating study helps us to understand how urban centers thrive, decline, and rise again—and prepares us for the role cities will play in the future.

Britain's New Towns

Garden Cities to Sustainable Communities

Author: Anthony Alexander

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 208

View: 602

The New Towns Programme of 1946 to 1970 was one of the most substantial periods of urban development in Britain. The New Towns have often been described as a social experiment; so what has this experiment proved? This book covers the story of how these towns came to be built, how they aged, and the challenges and opportunities they now face as they begin phases of renewal. The new approaches in design throughout their past development reflect changes in society throughout the latter half of the twentieth century. These changes are now at the heart of the challenge of sustainable development. The New Towns provide lessons for social, economic and environmental sustainability. These lessons are of great relevance for the regeneration of twentieth century urbanism and the creation of new urban developments today.