How to Interpret Family History & Ancestry DNA Test Results for Beginners

The Geography and History of Your Relatives

Author: Anne Hart

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 647

View: 152

How many DNA testing companies will show you how to interpret DNA test results for family history or direct you to instructional materials after you have had your DNA tested? Choose a company based on previous customer satisfaction, and whether the company gives you choices of how many markers you want, various ethnic and geographic databases, and surname projects based on DNA-driven genealogy. Before you select a company to test your DNA, find out how many genetic markers will be tested. For the maternal line, 400 base pairs of sequences are the minimum. For the paternal line (men only) 37 markers are great, but 25 markers also should be useful. Some companies offer a 12-marker test for surname genealogy groups at a special price. Find out how long the turnaround time is for waiting to receive your results. What is the reputation of the company? Do they have a contract with a university lab or a private lab? Who does the testing and who is the chief geneticist at their laboratory? What research articles, if any, has that scientist written or what research studies on DNA have been performed by the person in charge of the DNA testing at the laboratory? Who owns the DNA business that contracts with the lab? How involved in genealogy-related DNA projects and databases or services is the owner?

How to Interpret Your DNA Test Results for Family History & Ancestry

Scientists Speak Out on Genealogy Joining Genetics

Author: Anne Hart

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 268

View: 714

Scientists in the news speak out from opposite sides of the fence on the question of DNA testing for researching family history and ancestry. How do you interpret your own DNA test results? How do you work with or research oral history? What's the cultural component behind a trait as biological as your genes? If you're a beginning family historian, an oral history researcher, or a person with no science background fascinated with ancestry, here's how to understand and use the results of DNA tests. Scientists, media, historians, and business owners share different opinions on whether DNA testing is a useful tool in the hands of family historians. Steve Olson, author of the book, Mapping Human History in a telephone interview with me answered my question, "What do you say about using DNA as a tool for genealogy-to extend family history research?" Does Steve Olson think DNA testing as a tool is useful to genealogists? What does Bryan Sykes, author of the best-selling, The Seven Daughters of Eve have to say? Sykes's book has a very different opinion about DNA testing and genealogy/family history research. The two have opposite views. Numerous scientists comment. Sykes is associated with Oxford Ancestors, the world's first company to harness the power and precision of modern DNA-based genetics for use in genealogy. The motto on the Oxford Ancestors Web site reads: "Putting the genes in genealogy." Use these resources and easy to understand explanations for family history research.

Search Your Middle Eastern and European Genealogy

In the Former Ottoman Empire's Records and Online

Author: Anne Hart

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 152

View: 147

Includes information on doing genealogical research in Croatia, Bulgaria, Hungary, Eastern Europe, Poland, and Greece and research techniques such as interpreting family histories and ancestry DNA test results, collecting personal histories and interviewing older adults, recovering and preserving documents and other forms of information.

Tracing Your Jewish DNA for Family History & Ancestry

Merging a Mosaic of Communities

Author: Anne Hart

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 259

View: 162

Here's how to trace Jewish DNA specific to Eastern European Ashkenazim through a history of migrations toward a merging mosaic of communities. A perfect book for beginners in interpreting your DNA test results for family history and ancestry and taking a closer look at the founding mothers of Eastern European Jewish communities as well as the fathers. Where did the women originate? What directions were the migrations in ancient, medieval, and later times? And how did this bring about the particular DNA/genetic patterns we see today in the diverse Eastern European Jewish communities now found all over the world. Look up the genealogy of Jewish genes/DNA through 3,000 years of history. Here's how to interpret your own results. You don't need a science background to match your DNA to your most recent common ancestor who lived 250 or 100 or 1,000 years ago. Scientists speak out on the founding mothers and fathers of the Ashkenazic Jewish communities.

How to Open Dna-Driven Genealogy Reporting & Interpreting Businesses

Applying Your Communications Skills To Popular Health or Ancestry Issues In the News

Author: Anne Hart

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page:

View: 727

Here's how to open your own online DNA-driven genealogy reporting/interpreting service business. You wouldn't do the actual DNA testing. The laboratory you contract with does the testing and sends you reports that you interpret for your clients. As a DNA-driven genealogist, you would prepare illustrated and text-driven reports, colorful CDs, brochures, press kits, covers, Web sites, and guides to interpreting the DNA-for-ancestry-based information. You would interpret tests for deep ancestry to your clients. What verbal skills and any other preparation would you need to empower consumers with knowledge from reports you receive from your partnering DNA-testing laboratory? Would you also interpret reports from genetics counselors testing for predisposition to diseases? Or emphasize only deep ancestry? Would you need a self-taught science background, a genealogy hobby, or only marketing and communications experience? Who does the actual interpreting? How would you contract with DNA laboratories to send reports and other information related to ancestry? You may be a genealogist, a personal historian, or a life story videographer thinking of partnering with a DNA-testing laboratory. Your business would be to make complex information easy to understand and interpret in plain language DNA reports from scientists to genealogy clients and surname groups. The DNA tests could be for ancestry and/or nutritional genomics issues.

Tracing Your Caribbean Ancestors

A National Archives Guide

Author: Guy Grannum

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 240

View: 560

This book is ideal for anyone who reaserching their Caribbean family history The National Archives and beyond. The National Archives holds records for many people who lived in British West Indian colonies such as emigrants, plantation owners, slaves, soldiers, sailors and transported criminals. The Archives also hold the colonial office records for the British West Indies. This includes state correspondence to and from the colonies and passenger lists. Tracing Your Caribbean Ancestors also shows readers how to use family history sources and genealogy websites and indexes beyond The National Archives. Fully updated and revised, this new edition covers recent developments in Caribbean archives, including details of newly released information and archives that are now available online. This book outlines the primary research sources for those tracing their Caribbean ancestry and describes details of access to archives, further reading, useful websites and how to find and accurately search family history sources. As Britain does not hold locally created records of its dependencies such as church records, this book doubles as a gateway to the local history sources throughout the Caribbean that remain in each country's archives and register office. This book will be of use to anyone researching family history in British Caribbean countries of Anguilla, Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent, Trinidad and Tobago and the Turks and Caicos Islands as well as Guyana, Belize and Bermuda.

Predictive Medicine for Rookies

Consumer Watchdogs, Reviews, & Genetics Testing Firms Online

Author: Anne Hart

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 404

View: 587

This book is meant to empower the general consumer with knowledge about DNA testing for predisposition to diseases or for deep maternal and paternal ancestry when written records are absent. At home-genetic testing needs watchdogs, Web sites, and guidebooks to interpret test results in plain language for those with no science background. Online, you'll find genetic tests for ancestry or for familial (genetic, inherited) disease risks. What helpful suggestions do general consumers with no science background need to consider? What's new in medical marketing is genetic testing online for predisposition to diseases-such as breast cancer or blood conditions. Kits usually are sent directly to the consumer who returns a mouthwash or swab DNA sample by mail. What type of training do healthcare teams need in order to interpret the results of these tests to consumers? Once you receive the results of online genetic testing kits, how do you interpret it? If your personal physician isn't yet trained to interpret the results of online genetic tests, how can you find a healthcare professional that is trained?

Infant Gender Selection & Personalized Medicine

Consumer's Guide

Author: Anne Hart

Publisher: iUniverse

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 288

View: 824

Personalized medicine is what this book is about-tailoring your lifestyle, food, medicines, treatments, and reproductive choices to your genetic signature. According to Dr. Andrew Y. Silverman, MD, PhD, "The desire to influence the sex of the next child is probably as old as recorded history." "Gender selection is possible because of the way in which sex is determined by our chromosomes. Dr. Ericsson devised patented methods by which X and Y sperm can be separated through filtering processes. Sperm are "layered" over a column of human serum albumin, and they swim down the gradient where they are collected in the bottom layer. "The fraction of sperm that contains the male (Y) bearing sperm is used for insemination if a boy is desired. It is effective 70-75% of the time. "The fraction of sperm that contains the female (X) bearing sperm is used for insemination if a girl is desired. It is effective 70-72% of the time." Use personalized medicine more effectively. Empower consumers by interpreting DNA testing and learning more about infant gender choice by genetics.

Genealogy for Beginners

Author: Katherine Pennavaria

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Reference

Page: 264

View: 229

A step-by-step guide to researching your family tree. Interested in doing your family tree but don’t know how? Genealogy for Beginners covers everything you need to get started researching your family history or continue a project you’ve already started. You’ll get practical suggestions from an experienced genealogist, and detailed, step-by-step instructions for carrying out a quality family history research. Topics covered include: Getting started with a family history research project Discovering which subscription services are worth the price Using Ancestry.com effectively Finding obituaries Interviewing family members Preserving and organizing paper and digital files, plus photographs Getting the most out of DNA testing for genealogy Conducting cemetery research Finding and interpreting non-US records Doing cultural and ethnic heritage research Finding professional researchers and translators Keeping up with the genealogy news With this book in hand, you’re sure to succeed.

Human Genetics and Genomics

Author: Bruce R. Korf

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 280

View: 896

This fourth edition of the best-selling textbook, Human Genetics and Genomics, clearly explains the key principles needed by medical and health sciences students, from the basis of molecular genetics, to clinical applications used in the treatment of both rare and common conditions. A newly expanded Part 1, Basic Principles of Human Genetics, focuses on introducing the reader to key concepts such as Mendelian principles, DNA replication and gene expression. Part 2, Genetics and Genomics in Medical Practice, uses case scenarios to help you engage with current genetic practice. Now featuring full-color diagrams, Human Genetics and Genomics has been rigorously updated to reflect today’s genetics teaching, and includes updated discussion of genetic risk assessment, “single gene” disorders and therapeutics. Key learning features include: Clinical snapshots to help relate science to practice ‘Hot topics’ boxes that focus on the latest developments in testing, assessment and treatment ‘Ethical issues’ boxes to prompt further thought and discussion on the implications of genetic developments ‘Sources of information’ boxes to assist with the practicalities of clinical research and information provision Self-assessment review questions in each chapter Accompanied by the Wiley E-Text digital edition (included in the price of the book), Human Genetics and Genomics is also fully supported by a suite of online resources at www.korfgenetics.com, including: Factsheets on 100 genetic disorders, ideal for study and exam preparation Interactive Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) with feedback on all answers Links to online resources for further study Figures from the book available as PowerPoint slides, ideal for teaching purposes The perfect companion to the genetics component of both problem-based learning and integrated medical courses, Human Genetics and Genomics presents the ideal balance between the bio-molecular basis of genetics and clinical cases, and provides an invaluable overview for anyone wishing to engage with this fast-moving discipline.