How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate

Author: Andrew J. Hoffman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 120

View: 737

Though the scientific community largely agrees that climate change is underway, debates about this issue remain fiercely polarized. These conversations have become a rhetorical contest, one where opposing sides try to achieve victory through playing on fear, distrust, and intolerance. At its heart, this split no longer concerns carbon dioxide, greenhouse gases, or climate modeling; rather, it is the product of contrasting, deeply entrenched worldviews. This brief examines what causes people to reject or accept the scientific consensus on climate change. Synthesizing evidence from sociology, psychology, and political science, Andrew J. Hoffman lays bare the opposing cultural lenses through which science is interpreted. He then extracts lessons from major cultural shifts in the past to engender a better understanding of the problem and motivate the public to take action. How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate makes a powerful case for a more scientifically literate public, a more socially engaged scientific community, and a more thoughtful mode of public discourse.

How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate

Author: Andrew Hoffman

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 120

View: 919

Rather thanpointers to improve the dialogue about this pressing issue in hopes of finding common ground. attributing fault lines in the climate debate to rival scientific theories, this brief argues that the public is split by opposing cultural views through which science is interpreted. After considering how the media, social norms, and psychological factors cause us to accept or reject climate change, Andrew J. Hoffman provides

Strategic Climate Change Communications

Effective Approaches to Fighting Climate Denial

Author: Jasper Colin Fessmann

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 134

View: 563

For over 30 years the science on climate change has been clear: it is happening, we humans caused it, and it puts all our futures at risk. Global warming can still be reversed, or at least the worst prevented, if we act in time. However, despite valiant efforts by scientists, activists and science reporters, little meaningful change has occurred. This is largely the result of well-funded professional strategic communication efforts by vested interests. They have been highly successful in achieving their central goal: protecting the profitable status quo by creating gridlock to slow down meaningful action on climate change. Strategic Climate Science Communications: Effective Approaches to Fighting Climate Denial analyzes some of the communication strategies employed by deniers and the psychological mechanisms behind how they work. Several experts offer specific counter-strategies to change the conversation and foster meaningful societal change on global warming. The book helps environmental journalists to build up resistance against being manipulated by highly effective public relations techniques often successfully used against them. It can also help scientists and activists to become more effective communicators. An effective strategy is best countered by even better strategy.

Culture, Space and Climate Change

Vulnerability and Resilience in European Coastal Areas

Author: Thorsten Heimann

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Nature

Page: 300

View: 524

Ways of handling climate change vary worldwide. Differences can be observed in the perception of potential threats and opportunities as well as in the appraisal of adequate coping strategies. Collective efforts often fail not because of technical restrictions, but as a result of social and cultural differences between the actors involved. Consequently, there is a need to explore in greater depth those zones of cultural friction which emerge when actors deal with climate change. This book examines how cultural differences in the handling of climate change can be described and explained. The work develops the concept of culture as relational space, elaborates explanatory approaches, and investigates them by surveying more than 800 actors responsible for spatial development of the European coastal regions in the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, and Poland. In doing so, this book engages with debates on cultural globalisation, in which the attachment of culture to place is increasingly being questioned. Adopting the approach of culture as relational space allows possible cultural formations to be examined across diverse fields of application from the local to the global scale. In addition, the book investigates how far different value orientations, beliefs, and identities can explain diverse perceptions of problems and opportunities right up to preferences for climate-mitigation and adaptation measures. Providing comprehensive insights into the diverse zones of cultural friction which scholars and practitioners face when handling climate change locally and globally, this book will be of great interest to those studying climate change, environmental sociology, and sustainable planning.

The Hidden Power of Electronic Culture

How Media Shapes Faith, the Gospel, and Church

Author: Shane Hipps

Publisher: Zondervan

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 176

View: 718

The Hidden Power of Electronic Culture helps the church navigate its challenges and opportunities in the context of our electronic culture. Shane Hipps interprets and explains this culture and the implications for our faith and the church. This book invites us to engage new cultural realities while staying connected to our spiritual heritage.

The Archaeology and Ethnography of Central Africa

Author: James Denbow

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 246

View: 893

The Archaeology and Ethnography of Central Africa provides the first detailed description of the prehistory of the Loango coast of west-central Africa over the course of more than 3,000 years. The archaeological data presented in this volume comes from a pivotal area through which, as linguistic and historical reconstructions have long indicated, Bantu-speaking peoples expanded before reaching eastern and southern Africa. Despite its historical importance, the prehistory of the Atlantic coastal regions of west-central Africa has until now remained almost unknown. James Denbow offers an imaginative approach to this subject, integrating the scientific side of fieldwork with the interplay of history, ethnography, politics, economics, and personalities. The resulting 'anthropology of archaeology' highlights the connections between past and present, change and modernity, in one of the most inaccessible and poorly known regions of west-central and southern Africa.

At Risk

Natural Hazards, People's Vulnerability and Disasters

Author: Piers Blaikie

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 304

View: 942

At Risk reasserts the significance of the human factor in disasters. Establishing that the social, political and economic environment is as much a cause of disasters as the natural environment, the book argues that disaster mitigation is rooted in the potential humans have to understand their vulnerability and to take common action. Famines and drought, biological hazards, floods, coastal storms, earthquakes, volcanoes and landslides: At Risk draws practical and policy conclusions with a view to disaster reduction and the promotion of a safer environment.

Political Theory and Global Climate Change

Author: Steve Vanderheiden

Publisher: The MIT Press

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 280

View: 253

Political theorists consider the challenge of global climate change from a range of perspectives, including conceptual analysis, critical theory, critical legal studies, and neo-Marxism.