Household Words, Vol. 7: August, 1853 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 128

View: 578

Excerpt from Household Words, Vol. 7: August, 1853 Old Martin did not like any joking upon the subject of his smuggling stories. He shook his head, and merely said, Wait till next time. Then, to put an end to the conversation, he drew out his Spy-glass and began to observe what the men were doing in the Jenny - a kind of barge, in which lived two look-out men, and which always stood, high and dry, on a part of the beach. But, said I (for I would not let him off so cheaply), they tell me the last man was just such a bumpkin as that fellow you caught this morning. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Household Words, 1853, Vol. 7

A Weekly Journal; Being from No. 154 to No. 179 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 622

View: 576

Excerpt from Household Words, 1853, Vol. 7: A Weekly Journal; Being From No. 154 to No. 179 Samuel Marshall, and Friend Thomas Mlflln, gthe streets ofthe drab-coatedcity. There was nothing left for this poor ex colonial Judge ofadmu-alty, butto put himself on board awhmnerboundforenglmdand to find with us the liberty of opinion w 'ehamericam then toobentoneelz? Forberselftohavetimetoconoedetoher spring. Bewas at sea nearl twomonths; and beforehe landed at over, injuly, the of Bunkcr's Hill had been fought, and all hepes of peaceful accommodation dosed. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Novels and Tales Reprinted From Household Words, Vol. 7 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 672

View: 968

Excerpt from Novels and Tales Reprinted From Household Words, Vol. 7 About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Novels and Tales

Reprinted from Household Words

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 330

View: 689

Dickens and Empire

Discourses of Class, Race and Colonialism in the Works of Charles Dickens

Author: Grace Moore

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 638

Dickens and Empire offers a reevaluation of Charles Dickens's imaginative engagement with the British Empire throughout his career. Employing postcolonial theory alongside readings of Dickens's novels, journalism and personal correspondence, it explores his engagement with Britain's imperial holdings as imaginative spaces onto which he offloaded a number of pressing domestic and personal problems, thus creating an entangled discourse between race and class. Drawing upon a wealth of primary material, it offers a radical reassessment of the writer's stance on racial matters. In the past Dickens has been dismissed as a dogged and sustained racist from the 1850s until the end of his life; but here author Grace Moore reappraises The Noble Savage, previously regarded as a racist tract. Examining it side by side with a series of articles by Lord Denman in The Chronicle, which condemned the staunch abolitionist Dickens as a supporter of slavery, Moore reveals that the tract is actually an ironical riposte. This finding facilitates a review and reassessment of Dickens's controversial outbursts during the Sepoy Rebellion of 1857, and demonstrates that his views on racial matters were a good deal more complex than previous critics have suggested. Moore's analysis of a number of pre- and post-Mutiny articles calling for reform in India shows that Dickens, as their publisher, would at least have been aware of the grievances of the Indian people, and his journal's sympathy toward them is at odds with his vitriolic responses to the insurrection. This first sustained analysis of Dickens and his often problematic relationship to the British Empire provides fresh readings of a number of Dickens texts, in particular A Tale of Two Cities. The work also presents a more complicated but balanced view of one of the most famous figures in Victorian literature.

Household Words

Author: Anonymous

Publisher: Arkose Press

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 634

View: 122

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Household Words: A Weekly Journal;

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Palala Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 530

View: 292

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.