Household Words, 1853, Vol. 7

A Weekly Journal; Being from No. 154 to No. 179 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 622

View: 416

Excerpt from Household Words, 1853, Vol. 7: A Weekly Journal; Being From No. 154 to No. 179 Samuel Marshall, and Friend Thomas Mlflln, gthe streets ofthe drab-coatedcity. There was nothing left for this poor ex colonial Judge ofadmu-alty, butto put himself on board awhmnerboundforenglmdand to find with us the liberty of opinion w 'ehamericam then toobentoneelz? Forberselftohavetimetoconoedetoher spring. Bewas at sea nearl twomonths; and beforehe landed at over, injuly, the of Bunkcr's Hill had been fought, and all hepes of peaceful accommodation dosed. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Household Words, Vol. 7: August, 1853 (Classic Reprint)

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 128

View: 195

Excerpt from Household Words, Vol. 7: August, 1853 Old Martin did not like any joking upon the subject of his smuggling stories. He shook his head, and merely said, Wait till next time. Then, to put an end to the conversation, he drew out his Spy-glass and began to observe what the men were doing in the Jenny - a kind of barge, in which lived two look-out men, and which always stood, high and dry, on a part of the beach. But, said I (for I would not let him off so cheaply), they tell me the last man was just such a bumpkin as that fellow you caught this morning. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Household Words, 1853, Vol. 8

A Weekly Journal (Classic Reprint)

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Forgotten Books

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 618

View: 369

Excerpt from Household Words, 1853, Vol. 8: A Weekly Journal Beforeihadattached a meaning tothe words the trap was raised, andasbeing hurried down the narrow staircase. In a minute or two I was againlockedupinthe den with my old comyianiotoi? Who received me with a simultaneous pull long, commise rative faces, meant to be comical. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Pilgrim Edition of the Letters of Charles Dickens: Volume 7: 1853-1855

Author: Charles Dickens

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 1004

View: 215

This volume presents 1,251 letters, 447 previously unpublished, for the years 1853 to 1855, plus a substantial Appendix and Addenda containing over 280 letters of the years 1831 to 1852 which came to light too late for earlier volumes.

The Wonders

Lifting the Curtain on the Freak Show, Circus and Victorian Age

Author: John Woolf

Publisher: Michael O'Mara Books

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 899

'A promising young historian with a taste for the exotic.' Stephen Fry The Wonders is a radical new history of the Victorian age: meet the forgotten and extraordinary freak performers whose talents and disabilities helped define an era. On 23 March, 1844, General Tom Thumb, at 25 inches tall, entered the Picture Gallery at Buckingham Palace and bowed low to Queen Victoria. On both sides of the Atlantic, this meeting marked a tipping point in the nineteenth century - the age of the freak was born. Bewitching all levels of society, it was a world of astonishing spectacle - of dwarfs, giants, bearded ladies, Siamese twins and swaggering showmen - and one that has since inspired countless novels, films and musicals. But the real stories (human dramas that so often eclipsed the fantasy presented on the stage), of the performing men, women and children, have been forgotten or marginalized in the histories of the very people who exploited them. In this richly evocative account, Dr John Woolf uses a wealth of recently discovered material to bring to life the sometimes tragic, sometimes triumphant, always extraordinary stories of people who used their (dis)abilities and difference to become some of the first international celebrities. And through their lives we discover afresh some of the great transformations of the age: the birth of showbusiness, of celebrity, of advertising, of 'alternative facts'; while also exploring the tensions between the power of fame, the impact of exploitation and our fascination with 'otherness'.

Dickens, Journalism, and Nationhood

Mapping the World in Household Words

Author: Sabine Clemm

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 260

View: 412

Dickens, Journalism, and Nationhood examines Charles Dickens’ weekly family magazine Household Words in order to develop a detailed picture of how the journal negotiated, asserted and simultaneously deconstructed Englishness as a unified (and sometimes unifying) mode of expression. It offers close readings of a wide range of materials that self-consciously focus on the nature of England as well as the relationship between Britain and the European continent, Ireland, and the British colonies. Starting with the representation and classification of identities that took place within the framework of the Great Exhibition of 1851, it suggests that the journal strives for a model of the world in concentric circles, spiraling outward from the metropolitan center of London. Despite this apparent orderliness, however, each of the national or regional categories constructed by the journal also resists and undermines such a clear-cut representation.