The Hours of Simon de Varie

Author: James H. Marrow

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 255

View: 486

Leading French painters in the late medieval period executed miniatures for lavishly illuminated books of hours. In the mid-fifteenth century, Simon de Varie commissioned such a book. Completed in 1455, it included five priceless works by the most eminent French painter of the time, Jean Fouquet, as well as other striking paintings by two of his contemporaries. In the seventeenth century, Simon de Varie's book was divided into three sections and sold as separate volumes. Two of these volumes are today in the Royal Library in The Hague. The third volume--thought lost until 1984, when it surfaced in a private collection and was subsequently acquired by the Getty Museum--contains the first miniatures by Jean Fouquet to have been discovered in eighty years. This beautiful book will reproduce in color all of the miniatures and historiated initials in the original manuscript, along with selected text pages with secondary decoration. Comparative illustrations also accompany the two essays in the volume. Marrow's text addresses the role of books of hours in late medieval culture; the contents and form of de Varie's Hours; and the relationship of the miniatures by Fouquet to the rest of the artist's oeuvre. In a related essay, Francois Avril discusses the position of Simon de Varie and his family in mid-fifteenth-century France. The publication of The Hours of Simon de Varie adds to the Getty's impressive list of publications on illuminated manuscripts begun in 1990 and including the widely acclaimed facsimile Mira calligraphiae monumenta.

French Illuminated Manuscripts in the J. Paul Getty Museum

Author: Thomas Kren

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 114

View: 127

French Illuminated Manuscripts in the J. Paul Getty Museum introduces the public to the richness of the J. Paul Getty Museum's holdings in French manuscripts from the ninth to the eighteenth century. This volume includes full-color reproductions of masterpieces from such works as a bible from ninth-century Tours; a sacramentary attributed to Nivardus of Milan from the first quarter of the eleventh century; the Shah Abbas Bible, made in northern France about 1250; a book of hours made in the atelier of the Bedford Master in Paris about 1450; and a book of prayers of the mass, written and illuminated in Paris by Jean Pierre Rousselet about 1720-30. It also includes many multiple illuminations from such manuscripts as a psalter by the Master of the Ingeborg Psalter, made after 1205 and probably in Noyon; the Wenceslaus Psalter from 1250; and the Boucicaut Master's illuminated manuscript of Boccaccio's Des cas des nobles hommes et femmes from about 1415. French Illuminated Manuscripts in the J. Paul Getty Museum introduces the public to the richness of the J. Paul Getty Museum's holdings in French manuscripts from the ninth to the eighteenth century. This volume includes full-color reproductions of masterpieces from such works as a bible from ninth-century Tours; a sacramentary attributed to Nivardus of Milan from the first quarter of the eleventh century; the Shah Abbas Bible, made in northern France about 1250; a book of hours made in the atelier of the Bedford Master in Paris about 1450; and a book of prayers of the mass, written and illuminated in Paris by Jean Pierre Rousselet about 1720-30. It also includes many multiple illuminations from such manuscripts as a psalter by the Master of the Ingeborg Psalter, made after 1205 and probably in Noyon; the Wenceslaus Psalter from 1250; and the Boucicaut Master's illuminated manuscript of Boccaccio's Des cas des nobles hommes et femmes from about 1415.

A Masterpiece Reconstructed

The Hours of Louis XII

Author: Victoria and Albert Museum

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 98

View: 886

"Janet Backhouse, who originally assembled the evidence that revealed this long-forgotten masterpiece, introduces the Hours of Louis XII and its cycle of miniatures. Thomas Kren discusses the book's provocative miniature of Bathsheba bathing within the context of the king's own taste and predilections and within the then-emerging genre of the female nude in French painting. Nancy Turner considers the importance of Bourdichon's painting and illuminating technique in the Hours of Louis XII in relation to his other work. Mark Evans examines the individual histories of each of the surviving portions of the book. Lastly, an appendix reconstructs the book's devotional contents and program of illumination."--BOOK JACKET.

Piety in Pieces

How Medieval Readers Customized their Manuscripts

Author: Kathryn M. Rudy

Publisher: Open Book Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 412

View: 667

Medieval manuscripts resisted obsolescence. Made by highly specialised craftspeople (scribes, illuminators, book binders) with labour-intensive processes using exclusive and sometimes exotic materials (parchment made from dozens or hundreds of skins, inks and paints made from prized minerals, animals and plants), books were expensive and built to last. They usually outlived their owners. Rather than discard them when they were superseded, book owners found ways to update, amend and upcycle books or book parts. These activities accelerated in the fifteenth century. Most manuscripts made before 1390 were bespoke and made for a particular client, but those made after 1390 (especially books of hours) were increasingly made for an open market, in which the producer was not in direct contact with the buyer. Increased efficiency led to more generic products, which owners were motivated to personalise. It also led to more blank parchment in the book, for example, the backs of inserted miniatures and the blanks ends of textual components. Book buyers of the late fourteenth and throughout the fifteenth century still held onto the old connotations of manuscripts—that they were custom-made luxury items—even when the production had become impersonal. Owners consequently purchased books made for an open market and then personalised them, filling in the blank spaces, and even adding more components later. This would give them an affordable product, but one that still smacked of luxury and met their individual needs. They kept older books in circulation by amending them, attached items to generic books to make them more relevant and valuable, and added new prayers with escalating indulgences as the culture of salvation shifted. Rudy considers ways in which book owners adjusted the contents of their books from the simplest (add a marginal note, sew in a curtain) to the most complex (take the book apart, embellish the components with painted decoration, add more quires of parchment). By making sometimes extreme adjustments, book owners kept their books fashionable and emotionally relevant. This study explores the intersection of codicology and human desire. Rudy shows how increased modularisation of book making led to more standardisation but also to more opportunities for personalisation. She asks: What properties did parchment manuscripts have that printed books lacked? What are the interrelationships among technology, efficiency, skill loss and standardisation?

Faces of Power & Piety

Author: Erik Inglis

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 88

View: 801

Faces of Power and Piety is the second in the Medieval Imagination series of small, affordable books that draw on manuscript illuminations in the collections of the J. Paul Getty Museum and the British Library. Each volume focuses on a particular theme to provide an accessible introduction to the imagination of the medieval world. The faces featured in this volume include portraits of both illustrious historical figures and celebrated contemporaries. They reveal that medieval artists often disregarded their subject's physical appearance in favor of emphasizing qualities such as power and piety. Faces of Power and Piety also looks at the development of portraiture in the modern sense during the Renaissance, when likeness became an important component of portrait painting.

Masterpieces of the J. Paul Getty Museum: Illuminated Manuscripts

English Language Edition

Author: Thomas Kren

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 128

View: 326

The Getty Museum’s collection of illuminated manuscripts, featured in this book, comprises masterpieces of medieval and Renaissance art. Dating from the tenth to the sixteenth century, they were produced in France, Italy, Belgium, Germany, England, Spain, Poland, and the eastern Mediterranean. Among the highlights are four Ottonian manuscripts, Romanesque treasures from Germany, Italy, and France, an English Gothic Apocalypse, and late medieval manuscripts painted by such masters as Jean Fouquet, Girolamo da Cremona, Simon Marmion, and Joris Hoefnagel. Included are glistening liturgical books, intimate and touching devotional books for private use, books of the Bible, lively histories by Giovanni Boccaccio and Jean Froissart, and a breathtaking Model Book of Calligraphy.

Gardens of the Renaissance

Author: Bryan C. Keene

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 77

View: 650

Whether part of a grand villa or an extension of a common kitchen, gardens in the Renaissance were planted and treasured in all reaches of society. Illuminated manuscripts of the period offer a glimpse into how people at the time pictured, used, and enjoyed these idyllic green spaces. Drawn from a wide range of works in the Getty Museum's permanent collection, this gorgeously illustrated volume explores gardens on many levels, from the literary Garden of Love and the biblical Garden of Eden to courtly gardens of the nobility, and reports on the many activities—both reputable and scandalous—that took place there. This handsomely designed book is published on the occasion of an exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum from May 28 to August 11, 2013.

Departures

11 Artists at the Getty

Author: Tobi Levenberg Kaplan

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Architecture

Page: 64

View: 999

"The J. Paul Getty Museum decided to address these compelling questions by inviting eleven outstanding Los Angeles-area artists to explore the Getty Center in search of points of departure for their own work.".

Sacred Landscapes

Nature in Renaissance Manuscripts

Author: Bryan C. Keene

Publisher: Getty Publications

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 112

View: 468

Distant blue hills, soaring trees, vast cloudless skies—the majesty of nature has always had the power to lift the human spirit. For some it evokes a sense of timelessness and wonder. For others it reinforces religious convictions. And for many people today it raises concerns for the welfare of the planet. During the Renaissance, artists from Italy to Flanders and England to Germany depicted nature in their religious art to intensify the spiritual experience of the viewer. Devotional manuscripts for personal or communal use—from small-scale prayer books to massive choir books—were filled with some of the most illusionistic nature studies of this period. Sacred Landscapes, which accompanies an exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum, presents some of the most impressive examples of this art, gathering a wide range of illuminated manuscripts made between 1400 and 1600, as well as panel paintings, drawings, and decorative arts. Readers will see the influence of such masters as Albrecht Dürer, Jan van Eyck, Leonardo da Vinci, and Piero della Francesca and will gain new appreciation for manuscript illuminators like Simon Bening, Joris Hoefnagel, Vincent Raymond, and the Spitz Master. These artists were innovative in the early development of landscape painting and were revered throughout the early modern period. The authors provide thoughtful examination of works from the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries.