Homer

Odyssey, Books I-XII, XIII-XXIV

Author: Homer

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View: 268

Homer's Odyssey

Author: Homer

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Category: Epic poetry, Greek

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View: 374

In the Grip of Disease

Studies in the Greek Imagination

Author: G. E. R. Lloyd

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 324

This original and lively book explores Greek ideas about health and disease and their influence on Greek thought. Fundamental issues such as causation and responsibility, purification and pollution, mind-body relations and gender differences, authority and the expert and who can challenge them, reality and appearances, good government, happiness, and good and evil themselves are deeply implicated. Using the evidence not just from Greek medical theory and practice but also from epic, lyric, tragedy, historiography, philosophy, and religion, G. E. R. Lloyd offers the first comprehensive account of the influence of Greek thought about health and disease on the Greek imagination.

A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey

Author: Alfred Heubeck

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Epic poetry, Greek

Page: 312

View: 195

In the second volume, the commentaries by Heubeck (Books IX-XII) and Hoekstra (Books XIII-XVI) are both preceded by introductions, with Hoekstra paying special attention to diction in the Odyssey and the tradition of epic diction in general. The introductions and commentary have been thoroughly revised and adapted to the text of T. W. Allen in the Oxford Classical Text series.

The Odyssey

Author: Homer

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Category: Epic poetry, Greek

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View: 111

Homer’s Iliad

Author: Claude Brügger

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

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Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 348

View: 784

Research into traditional areas of Homeric scholarship (e.g., language, the structure of the text, etc.) has come a long way since the last comprehensive commentaries on the Iliad were carried out, that is, the commentary by Ameis-Hentze in German language in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century as well as the Cambridge commentary by Kirk et. al. in English language in the 1980/90s. Much of this kind of research is now set upon a much surer methodological and theoretical foundation. Developments in the field of Mycenology and in the study of Linear B, oral poetry, and the history of ancient Troy in particular, have made possible a number of new insights and interpretive possibilities in Homer’s epic. Moreover, modern secondary literature of all major languages has been systematically covered. The "Basel Commentary" to the Iliad is a new, up-to-date, standard work that addresses these issues directly and will be of interest to scholars, teachers, and students alike. Central to the commentary on Iliad 24 is the interpretation of one of the most exciting and most moving scenes of the Iliad: how Priam, the king of Troy, makes his way to his mortal enemy Achilles, by whose hand his son Hector had fallen; how the god Hermes leads the old man almost magically into the army camp of the Greeks; how Achilles, at the end of an emotional encounter with Priam, leaves the body of Hector for burial.

A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey: Introduction and Books I-VIII

Author: Alfred Heubeck

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 408

View: 693

This is the first instalment of a three-volume commentary in English, compiled by an international team of scholars and first published in Italian under the auspices of the Fondazione Lorenzo Valla. In this volume the commentary by West (Books I-IV) and Hainsworth (Books V-VIII) is preceded byan introduction which discusses previous research on the Odyssey, the nature of the poem and its relation to the Iliad, the epic dialect, and the transmission of the text. Book VI is a regular GCSE set text.