A History of the Witches of Renfrewshire

Author: Alexander Gardner

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 264

View: 773

A History of the Witches of Renfrewshire is an unchanged, high-quality reprint of the original edition of 1877. Hansebooks is editor of the literature on different topic areas such as research and science, travel and expeditions, cooking and nutrition, medicine, and other genres.As a publisher we focus on the preservation of historical literature.Many works of historical writers and scientists are available today as antiques only. Hansebooks newly publishes these books and contributes to the preservation of literature which has become rare and historical knowledge for the future.

The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 621

Between 1450 and 1750 thousands of people – most of them women – were accused, prosecuted and executed for the crime of witchcraft. The witch-hunt was not a single event; it comprised thousands of individual prosecutions, each shaped by the religious and social dimensions of the particular area as well as political and legal factors. Brian Levack sorts through the proliferation of theories to provide a coherent introduction to the subject, as well as contributing to the scholarly debate. The book: Examines why witchcraft prosecutions took place, how many trials and victims there were, and why witch-hunting eventually came to an end. Explores the beliefs of both educated and illiterate people regarding witchcraft. Uses regional and local studies to give a more detailed analysis of the chronological and geographical distribution of witch-trials. Emphasises the legal context of witchcraft prosecutions. Illuminates the social, economic and political history of early modern Europe, and in particular the position of women within it. In this fully updated third edition of his exceptional study, Levack incorporates the vast amount of literature that has emerged since the last edition. He substantially extends his consideration of the decline of the witch-hunt and goes further in his exploration of witch-hunting after the trials, especially in contemporary Africa. New illustrations vividly depict beliefs about witchcraft in early modern Europe.

Witch-Hunting in Scotland

Law, Politics and Religion

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 571

Shortlisted for the 2008 Katharine Briggs Award Witch-Hunting in Scotland presents a fresh perspective on the trial and execution of the hundreds of women and men prosecuted for the crime of witchcraft, an offence that involved the alleged practice of maleficent magic and the worship of the devil, for inflicting harm on their neighbours and making pacts with the devil. Brian P. Levack draws on law, politics and religion to explain the intensity of Scottish witch-hunting. Topics discussed include: the distinctive features of the Scottish criminal justice system the use of torture to extract confessions the intersection of witch-hunting with local and national politics the relationship between state-building and witch-hunting and the role of James VI Scottish Calvinism and the determination of zealous Scottish clergy and magistrates to achieve a godly society. This original survey combines broad interpretations of the rise and fall of Scottish witchcraft prosecutions with detailed case studies of specific witch-hunts. Witch-Hunting in Scotland makes fascinating reading for anyone with an interest in witchcraft or in the political, legal and religious history of the early modern period.

Satan and the Scots

The Devil in Post-Reformation Scotland, c.1560-1700

Author: Michelle D. Brock

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 334

Frequent discussions of Satan from the pulpit, in the courtroom, in print, in self-writings, and on the streets rendered the Devil an immediate and assumed presence in early modern Scotland. For some, especially those engaged in political struggle, this produced a unifying effect by providing a proximate enemy for communities to rally around. For others, the Reformed Protestant emphasis on the relationship between sin and Satan caused them to suspect, much to their horror, that their own depraved hearts placed them in league with the Devil. Exploring what it meant to live in a world in which Satan’s presence was believed to be, and indeed, perceived to be, ubiquitous, this book recreates the role of the Devil in the mental worlds of the Scottish people from the Reformation through the early eighteenth century. In so doing it is both the first history of the Devil in Scotland and a case study of the profound ways that beliefs about evil can change lives and shape whole societies. Building upon recent scholarship on demonology and witchcraft, this study contributes to and advances this body of literature in three important ways. First, it moves beyond establishing what people believed about the Devil to explore what these beliefs actually did- how they shaped the piety, politics, lived experiences, and identities of Scots from across the social spectrum. Second, while many previous studies of the Devil remain confined to national borders, this project situates Scottish demonic belief within the confluence of British, Atlantic, and European religious thought. Third, this book engages with long-running debates about Protestantism and the ’disenchantment of the world’, suggesting that Reformed theology, through its dogged emphasis on human depravity, eroded any rigid divide between the supernatural evil of Satan and the natural wickedness of men and women. This erosion was borne out not only in pages of treatises and sermons, but in the lives of Scots of all sorts. Ultimately, this study suggests that post-Reformation beliefs about the Devil profoundly influenced the experiences and identities of the Scottish people through the creation of a shared cultural conversation about evil and human nature.

Twisted Sisters

Women, Crime and Deviance in Scotland Since 1400

Author: Yvonne Galloway Brown

Publisher: John Donald

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 212

View: 799

Spanning the medieval period to modernity, the papers in this collection look at women's involvement in crime and deviance in both public and private spheres of Scottish society including infanticide, social deviance, witchcraft and political influence.

The Scottish Witch-Hunt in Context

Author: Julian Goodare

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 438

This book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft and witch-hunting, which covers the whole period of the Scottish witch-hunt, from the mid-16th century to the early 18th. It particularly emphasizes the later stages, since scholars are now as keen to explain why witch-hunting declined as why it occurred. There are studies of particular witchcraft panics, including a reassessment of the role of King James VI. The book thus covers a wide range of topics concerned with Scottish witch-hunting - and also places it in the context of other topics: gender relations, folklore, magic and healing, and moral regulation by church and state.

Religion, the Supernatural and Visual Culture in Early Modern Europe

An album amicorum for Charles Zika

Author: Jennifer Spinks

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 438

View: 793

This volume brings together some of the most exciting current scholarship on these themes. This interdisciplinary and geographically broad-ranging volume pays tribute to the ground-breaking work of Charles Zika.

The Devil Within

Possession and Exorcism in the Christian West

Author: Brian Levack

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 346

View: 697

A fascinating, wide-ranging survey examines the history of possession and exorcism through the ages.

The Witchcraft Sourcebook

Second Edition

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 390

View: 362

The Witchcraft Sourcebook, now in its second edition, is a fascinating collection of documents that illustrates the development of ideas about witchcraft from ancient times to the eighteenth century. Many of the sources come from the period between 1400 and 1750, when more than 100,000 people - most of them women - were prosecuted for witchcraft in Europe and colonial America. During these years the prominent stereotype of the witch as an evil magician and servant of Satan emerged. Catholics and Protestants alike feared that the Devil and his human confederates were destroying Christian society. Including trial records, demonological treatises and sermons, literary texts, narratives of demonic possession, and artistic depiction of witches, the documents reveal how contemporaries from various periods have perceived alleged witches and their activities. Brian P. Levack shows how notions of witchcraft have changed over time and considers the connection between gender and witchcraft and the nature of the witch's perceived power. This second edition includes an extended section on the witch trials in England, Scotland and New England, fully revised and updated introductions to the sources to include the latest scholarship and a short bibliography at the end of each introduction to guide students in their further reading. The Sourcebook provides students of the history of witchcraft with a broad range of sources, many of which have been translated into English for the first time, with commentary and background by one of the leading scholars in the field.

A New Dictionary of Fairies

A 21st Century Exploration of Celtic and Related Western European Fairies

Author: Morgan Daimler

Publisher: John Hunt Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 416

View: 631

Fairies are a challenging subject, intertwining culture, folklore, and anecdotal accounts across centuries and millennia. Focusing primarily on the Celtic speaking cultures, with some material from adjacent cultures including Anglo-Saxon and Norse, A New Dictionary of Fairies has in-depth entries on a variety of fairies as well as subjects related to them, such as why we picture elves with pointed ears or where the idea of fairies being invisible comes from. It also tackles more complicated topics like the nature and physicality of the fairy people. Anyone with an interest in the Good Neighbours will find this book a solid resource to draw from.

Poltergeist Over Scotland

Author: Geoff Holder

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 735

In 1945 the celebrated psi-researcher Harry Price published Poltergeist over England, popularising the word poltergeist (German for ‘noisy ghost’) and making famous the kind of physical haunting characterised by thrown objects, mysterious noises, and damage by fire or water. Now, for the first time, an astonishing array of historical Scottish poltergeist cases are gathered together, from the Middle Ages to the modern period - unearthing many episodes that have remained neglected for centuries. Some were no doubt hoaxes, but in others, multiple witnesses testified to disturbing events enacted over months. Whatever the true cause of the events, the historical evidence from Scotland suggests that poltergeist phenomena is undoubtedly real.

Witchcraft in Scotland

Author: Brian P. Levack

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN:

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 390

View: 415

Folk-medicine

A Chapter in the History of Culture

Author: William George Black

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Folklore

Page: 228

View: 701

This is the authoritative English work on medical folklore.