Historical Biblical Archaeology and the Future

The New Pragmatism

Author: Thomas Evan Levy

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 352

View: 240

Joint winner of the 2011 Biblical Archaeology Society Publication Award in the category "Best Scholarly Book on Archaeology" The archaeology of the Holy Land is undergoing major change. 'Historical Biblical Archaeology and the Future' describes the paradigm shift brought about by objective science-based dating methods, geographic information systems, anthropological models, and digital technology tools. The book serves as a model for how researchers can investigate the relationship between ancient texts (both sacred and profane) and the archaeological record. Influential archaeologists and biblical scholars examine a range of texts, materials and cultures: the Vedas and India; the Homeric legends and Greek Classical Archaeology; the Sagas and Icelandic archaeology; Islamic Archaeology; and the Umayyad, Abbasid, and Ayyubid periods. The groundbreaking essays offer a foundation for future research in biblical archaeology, ancient Jewish history and biblical studies.

The Future of Biblical Archaeology

Reassessing Methodologies and Assumptions : the Proceedings of a Symposium, August 12-14, 2001 at Trinity International University

Author: James Karl Hoffmeier

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 385

View: 739

In recent times Biblical archaeology has been heavily criticised by some camp who maintain that it has little to offer Near Eastern archaeology. However, some scholars carry on the fight to change people's views and this collection of essays continues the trend towards reassessing and reemphasising the link between the Bible and archaeology.

Biblical Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction

Author: Eric H Cline

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 168

View: 428

Public interest in biblical archaeology is at an all-time high, as television documentaries pull in millions of viewers to watch shows on the Exodus, the Ark of the Covenant, and the so-called Lost Tomb of Jesus. Important discoveries with relevance to the Bible are made virtually every year--during 2007 and 2008 alone researchers announced at least seven major discoveries in Israel, five of them in or near Jerusalem. Biblical Archaeology offers a passport into this fascinating realm, where ancient religion and modern science meet, and where tomorrow's discovery may answer a riddle that has lasted a thousand years. Archaeologist Eric H. Cline here offers a complete overview of this exciting field. He discusses the early pioneers, such as Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie and William Foxwell Albright, the origins of biblical archaeology as a discipline, and the major controversies that first prompted explorers to go in search of objects and sites that would "prove" the Bible. He then surveys some of the most well-known biblical archaeologists, including Kathleen Kenyon and Yigael Yadin, the sites that are essential sources of knowledge for biblical archaeology, such as Hazor, Megiddo, Gezer, Lachish, Masada, and Jerusalem, and some of the most important discoveries that have been made, including the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Mesha Inscription, and the Tel Dan Stele. Subsequent chapters examine additional archaeological finds that shed further light on the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, the issue of potential frauds and forgeries, including the James Ossuary and the Jehoash Tablet, and future prospects of the field. Biblical Archaeology: A Very Short Introduction captures the sense of excitement and importance that surrounds not only the past history of the field but also the present and the future, with fascinating new discoveries made each and every season. About the Series: Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life's most interesting topics. Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest contemporary thinking about the central problems and issues in hundreds of key topics, from philosophy to Freud, quantum theory to Islam.

History, Archaeology and The Bible Forty Years After "Historicity"

Changing Perspectives 6

Author: Ingrid Hjelm

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 230

View: 145

In History, Archaeology and the Bible Forty Years after "Historicity", Hjelm and Thompson argue that a ‘crisis’ broke in the 1970s, when several new studies of biblical history and archaeology were published, questioning the historical-critical method of biblical scholarship. The crisis formed the discourse of the Copenhagen school’s challenge of standing positions, which—together with new achievements in archaeological research—demand that the regional history of ancient Israel, Judaea and Palestine be reconsidered in all its detail. This volume examines the major changes that have taken place within the field of Old Testament studies since the ground breaking works of Thomas Thompson and John van Seters in 1974 and 1975 (both republished in 2014). The book is divided in three sections: changing perspectives in biblical studies, history and cult, and ideology and history, presenting new articles from some of the field’s best scholars with comprehensive discussion of historical, archaeological, anthropological, cultural and literary approaches to the Hebrew Bible and Palestine’s history. The essays question: "How does biblical history relate to the archaeological history of Israel and Palestine?" and "Can we view the history of the region independently of a biblical perspective?" by looking at the problem from alternative angles and questioning long-held interpretations. Unafraid to break new ground, History, Archaeology and the Bible Forty Years after "Historicity" is a vital resource to students in the field of Biblical and East Mediterranean Studies, and anyone with an interest in the archaeology, history and religious development in Palestine and the ancient Near East.

Biblical Archaeology

An Introduction with Recent Discoveries That Support the Reliability of the Bible

Author: David Elton Graves

Publisher: Createspace Independent Pub

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 376

View: 957

Each year archaeologists discover many new finds at sites throughout the lands of the Bible, but few of them make the news headlines. Revisionist scholars often seek to undermine and downplay the relevance of many of the discoveries, believing that Sodom never existed, the Exodus never happened, Jericho never fell to the Israelites, and David was never a great king. This work challenges the minimalist views by bringing together many of the new discoveries from the last 20 years highlighting the recent finds that are relevant to the claims of the Bible. Experienced archaeologist David Graves has assembled a helpful collection of discoveries that will take you on a journey to: • Confirm the historicity of the biblical events and people of the past• Explore the full range of new archaeological discoveries, from pottery, inscriptions, seals, ossuaries, through to coins, manuscripts, and other artifacts• Present a short history of archaeology, outlining its characteristics and role in Christian apologetics• Lay out the limitations of archaeology and its methodological fallacies• Explain the meticulous method of excavation• Explore the significance of manuscripts for the transmission of the Bible• Navigate the maze of arguments between the minimalists and maximalists controversyThis insightful book will: • Illustrate archaeological finds with more than 140 pertinent photographs• Provide numerous detailed maps, carefully crafted charts and tables of previous discoveries• Include helpful breakout panes, dealing with “Quotes from Antiquity,” and “Moments in History”• Include a glossary defining technical archaeological terms• Provide extensive footnotes and bibliography for future studyThis invaluable resource provides an interesting and informative understanding of the cultural and historical background of the Bible illustrated from archaeology. This is an accessible resource intended for laypeople who want to know more about archaeology and the Bible, whether in seminary courses, college classrooms, church groups or personal study.

Dinner at Dan

Biblical and Archaeological Evidence for Sacred Feasts at Iron Age II Tel Dan and Their Significance

Author: Jonathan S. Greer

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 214

View: 871

In Dinner at Dan, Jonathan S. Greer offers a synthesis of biblical and archaeological evidence for sacred feasts at the Levantine site of Tel Dan from the late 10th century - mid-8th century BCE and explores their significance.

Digging Up the Bible

Introduction and Brief History of Biblical Archaeology

Author: David Graves

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 138

View: 752

Experienced archaeologist Dr. David E. Graves has assembled a helpful introduction and brief history of biblical archaeology written for undergraduate students to provide a foundation for the discoveries presented in the companion volumes of The Archaeology of the New Testament and The Archaeology of the Old Testament. Chapters include: Brief History of Biblical Archaeology, Understanding Dates in Archaeology, Characteristics of Archaeology, The Role of Archaeology in Biblical Studies, Limitations of Archaeology, Controversy in Biblical Archaeology, Archaeological Fallacies, and Excavation: How Its Done. The history of archaeology is filled with, espionage, romance, diplomacy, and intrigue and fascinating to see how artifacts were first discovered and recovered.This insightful book will: · Illustrate archaeological finds with more than 50 pertinent color photographs, detailed map and carefully crafted charts· Include a glossary defining technical archaeological terms· Provide extensive footnotes and bibliography for future study· Include a detailed subject index This is an accessible introduction to biblical archaeology intended for laypeople who want to know more about the history of archaeology and how it is done, whether in seminary courses, college classrooms, church groups, or personal study.

History, Politics and the Bible from the Iron Age to the Media Age

Author: James G. Crossley

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 158

As biblical studies becomes increasingly fragmented, this collection of essays brings together a number of leading scholars in order to show how historical reconstruction, philology, metacriticism, and reception history can be part of a collective vision for the future of the field. This collection of essays focuses more specifically on critical questions surrounding the construction of ancient Israel(s), 'minimalism', the ongoing significance of lexicography, the development of early Judaism, orientalism, and the use of the Bible in contemporary political discourses. Contributors include John van Seters, Niels Peter Lemche, Ingrid Hjelm, and Philip R. Davies.

Past, Present, Future

The Deuteronomistic History and the Prophets

Author: Johannes Cornelis de Moor

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 342

View: 735

The re-writing of the history of Israel, in the light of past failures and hopes for the future, by Deuteronomistic historians and prophets, is discussed in this series of studies. In this volume, the vitality of the Hebrew Scriptures is once again demonstrated.

Digging Up Jericho

Past, Present and Future

Author: Bill Finlayson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page:

View: 997

21 papers present a holistic perspective on the research and public value of the site of Jericho - an iconic site with a long and impressive history stretching from the Epipalaeolithic to the present day. Covering all aspects of archaeological work from past to present and beyond, they re-evaluate and assess the legacy of this important site.

Digging Up the Bible

Introduction and Brief History of Biblical Archaeology B&W

Author: David E Graves

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 140

View: 532

Experienced archaeologist Dr. David E. Graves has assembled a helpful introduction and brief history of biblical archaeology written for undergraduate students to provide a foundation for the discoveries presented in the companion volumes of The Archaeology of the New Testament and The Archaeology of the Old Testament. Chapters include: Brief History of Biblical Archaeology, Understanding Dates in Archaeology, Characteristics of Archaeology, The Role of Archaeology in Biblical Studies, Limitations of Archaeology, Controversy in Biblical Archaeology, Archaeological Fallacies, and Excavation: How Its Done. This insightful book will: - Illustrate archaeological finds with more than 50 pertinent color photographs, detailed map and carefully crafted charts- Include a glossary defining technical archaeological terms- Provide extensive footnotes and bibliography for future study- Include a detailed subject index This is an accessible introduction to biblical archaeology intended for laypeople who want to know more about the history of archaeology and how it is done, whether in seminary courses, college classrooms, church groups, or personal study.

Controlling the Past, Owning the Future

The Political Uses of Archaeology in the Middle East

Author: Ran Boytner

Publisher: University of Arizona Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 312

View: 797

What are the political usesÑand misusesÑof archaeology in the Middle East? In answering this question, the contributors to this volume lend their regional expertise to a variety of case studies, including the TalibanÕs destruction of Buddhas in Afghanistan, the commercialization of archaeology in Israel, the training of Egyptian archaeology inspectors, and the debate over Turkish identity sparked by the film Troy, among other provocative subjects. Other chapters question the ethical justifications of archaeology in places that have Òalternative engagements with the material past.Ó In the process, they form various views of the role of the archaeologist, from steward of the historical record to agent of social change. The diverse contributions to this volume share a common framework in which the political use of the past is viewed as a process of social discourse. According to this model, political appropriations are seen as acts of social communication designed to accrue benefits to particular groups. Thus the contributors pay special attention to competing social visions and the filters these impose on archaeological data. But they are also attentive to the potential consequences of their own work. Indeed, as the editors remind us, ÒpeopleÕs lives may be affected, sometimes dramatically, because of the material remains that surround them.Ó Rounding out this important volume are critiques by two top scholars who summarize and synthesize the preceding chapters.

Interpreting Ancient Israelite History, Prophecy, and Law

Author: John H. Hayes

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 320

View: 630

Contents The History of the Study of Israelite and Judean History Wellhausen as a Historian of Israel The Twelve-Tribe Israelite Amphicyony: An Appraisal The Final Years of Samaria (730-720 BC) The History of the Form-Critical Study of Prophecy The Usage of Oracles against Foreign Nations in Ancient Israel Amos's Oracles against the Nations (1:2--2:16) Restitution, Forgiveness, and the Victim in Old Testament Law Covenant Covenant and Hesed: The Status of the Discussion

The Oxford History of the Biblical World

Author: Michael David Coogan

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 487

View: 239

Examines the history, art, architecture, languages, literatures, society, and religion of Biblical Israel and early Judaism and Christianity

The Authors of the Deuteronomistic History

Locating a Tradition in Ancient Israel

Author: Brian Neil Peterson

Publisher: Fortress Press

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 192

View: 635

Peterson engages the identities and provenances of the authors of the various “editions” of the Deteronomistic History. Peterson asks where we might locate a figure with both motive and opportunity to draw up a proto-narrative including elements of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and the first part of 1 Kings. Peterson identifies a particular candidate in the time of David qualified to write the first edition. He then identifies the particular circle of custodians of the Deuteronomistic narrative and supplies successive redactions down to the time of Jeremiah.

Biblical History and Israel S Past

The Changing Study of the Bible and History

Author: Megan Bishop Moore

Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 518

View: 211

Although scholars have for centuries primarily been interested in using the study of ancient Israel to explain, illuminate, and clarify the biblical story, Megan Bishop Moore and Brad E. Kelle describe how scholars today seek more and more to tell the story of the past on its own terms, drawing from both biblical and extrabiblical sources to illuminate ancient Israel and its neighbors without privileging the biblical perspective. Biblical History and Israel s Past provides a comprehensive survey of how study of the Old Testament and the history of Israel has changed since the middle of the twentieth century. Moore and Kelle discuss significant trends in scholarship, trace the development of ideas since the 1970s, and summarize major scholars, viewpoints, issues, and developments.

The Bible Unearthed

Archaeology's New Vision of Ancient Isreal and the Origin of Sacred Texts

Author: Israel Finkelstein

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 400

View: 739

In this groundbreaking work that sets apart fact and legend, authors Finkelstein and Silberman use significant archeological discoveries to provide historical information about biblical Israel and its neighbors. In this iconoclastic and provocative work, leading scholars Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman draw on recent archaeological research to present a dramatically revised portrait of ancient Israel and its neighbors. They argue that crucial evidence (or a telling lack of evidence) at digs in Israel, Egypt, Jordan, and Lebanon suggests that many of the most famous stories in the Bible—the wanderings of the patriarchs, the Exodus from Egypt, Joshua’s conquest of Canaan, and David and Solomon’s vast empire—reflect the world of the later authors rather than actual historical facts. Challenging the fundamentalist readings of the scriptures and marshaling the latest archaeological evidence to support its new vision of ancient Israel, The Bible Unearthed offers a fascinating and controversial perspective on when and why the Bible was written and why it possesses such great spiritual and emotional power today.

Far From Minimal

Celebrating the Work and Influence of Philip R. Davies

Author: Duncan Burns

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 576

View: 765

Marking the 60th birthday of Professor Philip R. Davies, Dr. Duncan Burns and John W. Rogerson, his former student and colleague, respectively, aim to do him justice. They have comprised articles from their peers to reflect on the impact Professor Davies has made in three particular areas of study: Hebrew Bible, Qumran, and Paleastinian Archaeology; New Testament and Early Judaism; and Biblical Interpretation. The breadth of this volume aims to reflect the scope, interest, and influence of Professor Davies from the last 30 years.

Biblical Archaeology

Vol. 2 Second Edition B&w: Famous Discoveries That Support the Reliability of the Bible

Author: David Graves

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 278

View: 851

Thousands of artifacts have been discovered that relate to the Bible, but few of them make the news headlines. Revisionist scholars often seek to undermine and downplay the relevance of many of the discoveries, believing that Sodom never existed, the Exodus never happened, Jericho never fell to the Israelites, and David was never a great king. Volume one presented the recent finds from the last 20 years, while this work also challenges the minimalist views by bringing together many of the famous discoveries from the last 100 years highlighting the notable finds that are relevant to the claims of the Bible. Experienced archaeologist David Graves has again assembled a helpful collection of discoveries that will take you on a journey to confirm the historicity of the biblical events and people of the past. Graves will explore the full range of famous archaeological discoveries, from pottery, inscriptions, seals, ossuaries, through to coins, manuscripts, and other artifacts. This insightful book will: Illustrate archaeological finds with more than 160 pertinent photographs Provide numerous detailed maps, and carefully crafted charts Include a glossary defining technical archaeological terms Provide extensive footnotes and bibliography for future study Include a helpful subject and important author index This invaluable resource provides an interesting and informative understanding of the cultural and historical background of the Bible illustrated from archaeology. This is an accessible resource intended for laypeople who want to know more about archaeology and the Bible, whether in seminary courses, college classrooms, church groups or personal study.