Heroes of Empire

Five Charismatic Men and the Conquest of Africa

Author: Edward Berenson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 804

Presents a history of the exploration of Africa between 1870 and 1914 by British and French explorers and argues that these men transformed the imperial steeplechase of those years into a powerful heroic moment.

Heroes of the Empire

Author: Chris Wraight

Publisher: Games Workshop

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 900

View: 465

A fantastic collection of classic stories about the righteous armies of the Empire set in the Warhammer Fantasy universe. The Empire is besieged. Countless enemies batter the border of Sigmar’s mighty nation, seeking to tear down its cities and murder its inhabitants. Standing against them are an array of brave men and women, united in their defiance and led by true heroes. In the wilderness of Averland, Kurt Helborg, Marshal of the Reiksguard, holds the province together in his iron grip. On the frontiers, Ludwig Schwarzhelm, Emperor’s Champion, must halt the unstoppable onslaught of the Greenskins, while in the Drakwald Forest, Luthor Huss, warrior priest of Sigmar, fights a tide of undead that threatens to sweep away all before it. But, more insidious enemies lurk within the shadows. Witch hunters and spies are the only remedy to such poisons, and none are more accomplished than Lukas Eichmann and Pieter Verstohlen, whose individual quests find them on the trail of ruthless murders and labyrinthine conspiracies that threaten to tear the nation asunder. Will these heroes triumph, or will the myriad evils of the Old World bring ruin to the hope of humanity? This omnibus contains the novels Sword of Justice, Sword of Vengeance and Luthor Huss and the short stories ‘Feast of Horrors', 'Duty and Honour' and 'The March of Doom', by Chris Wraight.

Heroes of Empire

The British Imperial Protagonist in America, 1596-1764

Author: Richard Frohock

Publisher: University of Delaware Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 227

View: 667

Over the past decade, literary scholars have become increasingly engaged with colonial studies and have fashioned various points of focus in their investigations of imperialist narratives, including the figure of woman, cannibalism, the romance of the first encounter, and the tropicopolitan. This book builds on existing work by offering a new focal point: the evolution of the British imperial hero in America from Sir Walter Ralegh's Discoverie of... Guiana (1596) to James Grainger's The Sugar Cane (1764), with concentration on narratives produced between the year of Cromwell's Western Design (1655) and the British raid on Cartegena (1741). Each individual chapter isolates a distinct type of colonial hero, furnishing examples from a wide variety of narratives, including some nonfiction essays and tracts, but chiefly novels, plays, and poems.

Hero of the Empire

The Boer War, a Daring Escape, and the Making of Winston Churchill

Author: Candice Millard

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 416

View: 806

A thrilling narrative of Winston Churchill's extraordinary and little-known exploits during the Boer War. Churchill arrived in South Africa in 1899, valet and crates of vintage wine in tow, there to cover the brutal colonial war the British were fighting with Boer rebels. But just two weeks after his arrival Churchill was taken prisoner ... The story of his escape is incredible enough, but then Churchill enlisted, returned to South Africa, fought in several battles, and ultimately liberated the men with whom he had been imprisoned. Hero of Empire is more than an adventure story, for the lessons Churchill took from the Boer War would profoundly affect twentieth-century history.

Heroes and Villains of the British Empire

Their Lives and Legends

Author: Stephen Basdeo

Publisher: Pen and Sword History

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 129

From the sixteenth until the twentieth century, British power and influence gradually expanded to cover one quarter of the world’s surface. The common saying was that “the sun never sets on the British Empire”. What began as a largely entrepreneurial enterprise in the early modern period, with privately run joint stock trading companies such as the East India Company driving British commercial expansion, by the nineteenth century had become, especially after 1857, a state-run endeavor, supported by a powerful military and navy. By the Victorian era, Britannia really did rule the waves. Heroes of the British Empire is the story of how British Empire builders such as Robert Clive, General Gordon, and Lord Roberts of Kandahar were represented and idealized in popular culture. The men who built the empire were often portrayed as possessing certain unique abilities which enabled them to serve their country in often inhospitable territories, and spread what imperial ideologues saw as the benefits of the British Empire to supposedly uncivilized peoples in far flung corners of the world. These qualities and abilities were athleticism, a sense of fair play, devotion to God, and a fervent sense of duty and loyalty to the nation and the empire. Through the example of these heroes, people in Britain, and children in particular, were encouraged to sign up and serve the empire or, in the words of Henry Newbolt, “Play up! Play up! And Play the Game!” Yet this was not the whole story: while some writers were paid up imperial propagandists, other writers in England detested the very idea of the British Empire. And in the twentieth century, those who were once considered as heroic military men were condemned as racist rulers and exploitative empire builders.

Heroes of Empire

Five Charismatic Men and the Conquest of Africa

Author: Edward Berenson

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 360

View: 646

Examines, through the lives of five important English and French figures, the history of the exploration and colonization of Africa between 1870 and 1914, and the role the mass media played in promoting colonial conquest.

Soldier Heroes

British Adventure, Empire and the Imagining of Masculinities

Author: Graham Dawson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 368

View: 724

Soldier Heroes explores the imagining of masculinities within adventure stories. Drawing on literary theory, cultural materialism and Kleinian psychoanalysis, it analyses modern British adventure heroes as historical forms of masculinity originating in the era of nineteenth-century popular imperialism, traces their subsequent transformations and examines the way these identities are internalized and lived by men and boys.

Heroes and Villains of the British Empire

Their Lives and Legends

Author: Stephen Basdeo

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: History

Page:

View: 231

From the sixteenth until the twentieth century, British power and influence gradually expanded to cover one quarter of the world's surface. The common saying was that "the sun never sets on the British Empire". What began as a largely entrepreneurial enterprise in the early modern period, with privately run joint stock trading companies such as the East India Company driving British commercial expansion, by the nineteenth century had become, especially after 1857, a state-run endeavour, supported by a powerful military and navy. By the Victorian era, Britannia really did rule the waves.Heroes of the British Empire is the story of how British Empire builders such as Robert Clive, General Gordon, and Lord Roberts of Kandahar were represented and idealised in popular culture. The men who built the empire were often portrayed as possessing certain unique abilities which enabled them to serve their country in often inhospitable territories, and spread what imperial ideologues saw as the benefits of the British Empire to supposedly uncivilised peoples in far flung corners of the world. These qualities and abilities were athleticism, a sense of fair play, devotion to God, and a fervent sense of duty and loyalty to the nation and the empire. Through the example of these heroes, people in Britain, and children in particular, were encouraged to sign up and serve the empire or, in the words of Henry Newbolt, "Play up! Play up! And Play the Game!"Yet this was not the whole story: while some writers were paid up imperial propagandists, other writers in England detested the very idea of the British Empire. And in the twentieth century, those who were once considered as heroic military men were condemned as racist rulers and exploitative empire builders.

Unfit for Heroes

Reconstruction and Soldier Settlement in the Empire Between the Wars

Author: Kent Fedorowich

Publisher: Manchester : Manchester University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 243

View: 791

The resettlement and rehabilitation of the British Empire's servicemen and women after World War I presented post-war administrations with a host of acute social, political and economic problems. One of the more expensive solutions advanced by reconstruction planners was the resettlement of returning veterans on the land.

From Servants of the Empire to Everyday Heroes

The British Honours System in the Twentieth Century

Author: Tobias Harper

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 500

In the twentieth century, the British Crown appointed around a hundred thousand people - military and civilian - in Britain and the British Empire to honours and titles. For outsiders, and sometimes recipients too, these jumbles of letters are tantalizingly confusing: OM, MBE, GCVO, CH, KB, or CBE. Throughout the century, this system expanded to include different kinds of people, while also shrinking in its imperial scope with the declining empire. Through these dual processes, this profoundly hierarchical system underwent a seemingly counter-intuitive change: it democratized. Why and how did the British government change this system? And how did its various publics respond to it? This study addresses these questions directly by looking at the history of the honours system in the wider context of the major historical changes in Britain and the British Empire in the twentieth century. In particular, it looks at the evolution of this hierarchical, deferential system amidst democratization and decolonization. It focuses on the system's largest-and most important-components: the Order of the British Empire, the Knight Bachelor, and the lower ranks of other Orders. By creatively analysing the politics and administration of the system alongside popular responses to it in diaries, letters, newspapers, and memoirs, Tobias Harper shows the many different meanings that honours took on for the establishment, dissidents, and recipients. He also shows the ways in which the system succeeded and failed to order and bring together divided societies.

HEROES OF THE EMPIRE

Author: JOSE LUNA

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN:

Category: Religion

Page: 76

View: 484

In this short book, Ptr. Luna explores some obscure biblical figures and carefully presents their contribution to the enlargement of God's kingdom.

Heroes of the Empire

Doom

Author: Mr Michael P Andre

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category:

Page: 212

View: 430

Earthlings have colonised much of its arm of the Milky Way galaxy and has had a long era of peace. Suddenly, a small ship of explorers was attacked near the rim of Earth's empire and everyone was killed without damaging the ship. A patrol craft which was sent to investigate was similarly attacked. The attacker was invisible to any tracking device and had drained the life of all living organisms in the ships. When attacks began on populated planets, military action was ruled out to prevent the situation from getting worse. Instead, an experienced special agent on the other side of the empire was recalled from his vacation and sent to resolve the issue. This begins the story of this agent's gruelling mission to determine what the attacker was and stop it from killing billions of lives.

Heroes of the Empire

Deeds of Valour on Britain's Scroll of Glory

Author: John Lea

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Explorers

Page:

View: 221

Traitors of Rome (Eagles of the Empire 18)

Roman army heroes Cato and Macro face treachery in the ranks

Author: Simon Scarrow

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 574

TRAITORS OF ROME: THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER An enthralling Cato and Macro adventure from bestselling author Simon Scarrow. Not to be missed by readers of Conn Iggulden and Bernard Cornwell. AD 56. Battle-hardened veterans of the Roman army Tribune Cato and Centurion Macro are garrisoned at the eastern border, aware that their movements are constantly monitored by spies from dangerous, mysterious Parthia. But the enemy within could be the deadliest threat to the Legion ... and the Empire. There's a traitor in the ranks. Rome shows no mercy to those who betray their comrades, and the Empire. But first the guilty man must be discovered. Cato and Macro are in a race against time to expose the truth, while the powerful enemy over the border waits to exploit any weaknesses in the Legion. The traitor must die ... Praise for Simon Scarrow's bestselling novels: 'Blood, gore, political intrigue...A historical fiction thriller that'll have you reaching for your gladius' Daily Sport 'Gripping... ferocious and compelling' Daily Express 'Brilliantly told adventures ... Roman soldiering at its very best - even by Scarrow's high standards' Sunday Sport