Heroes and Humanities

Detective Fiction and Culture

Author: Ray Broadus Browne

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 141

View: 676

Mystery fiction, although essentially the same in all its national varieties, nevertheless comes in several types and several wrappings. The present study of American, Australian, and Canadian detective fiction concerns literature which speaks in the ways of heroes and humanities about the human condition. All authors studied here, to one degree or another, demonstrate their concern with human society, some more strongly than others, but all with their eyes on the human situation and human existence. At times these studies lean toward the tragic in their outlook and development. In all instances they center on the humanistic.

Teaching Crime Fiction

Author: Charlotte Beyer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 216

View: 672

More than perhaps any other genre, crime fiction invites debate over the role of popular fiction in English studies. This book offers lively original essays on teaching crime fiction written by experienced British and international scholar teachers, providing vital insight into this diverse genre through a series of compelling subjects. Taking its starting-point in pedagogical reflections and classroom experiences, the book explores methods for teaching students to develop their own critical perspectives as crime fiction critics, the impact of feminism, postcolonialism, and ecocriticism on crime fiction, crime fiction and film, the crime short story, postgraduate perspectives, and more.

The Female Investigator in Literature, Film, and Popular Culture

Author: Lisa M. Dresner

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 317

In this book the author examines how women detectives are portrayed in film, in literature and on TV. Chapters examine the portrayal of female investigators in each of these four genres: the Gothic novel, the lesbian detective novel, television and film.

Lesbian Detective Fiction

Woman as Author, Subject and Reader

Author: Phyllis M. Betz

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 207

View: 730

"The main intention of this study is to offer a full-length analysis of the matter of lesbian detective fiction--its content, characters, and structures--and the motive for lesbians reading detective fiction"--Provided by publisher.

Continuities in Popular Culture

The Present in the Past & the Past in the Present and Future

Author: Ray Broadus Browne

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 268

View: 108

The humanities are the strongest dynamic that runs from the past into the future. Throughout history, except for the past one hundred fifty years, the strongest element in the humanities has been the culture of the folk. Now it is the everyday culture of a democratic society—popular culture, a key to people’s understanding themselves and their society. These sixteen essays by leading popular culture scholars demonstrate how elements in our everyday life flourished in the past, came to flower today, and will continue to shape us in the future.

Pioneers in Popular Culture Studies

Author: Ray Broadus Browne

Publisher: Popular Press

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 234

View: 362

The Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association found a fixed canon and revolutionized the study of the humanities and social sciences in the United States and around the world by making that canon fluid. The full ramifications of this revolt against traditional academia not finished nor fully understood. This is a record of the goals and accomplishments of the pioneers in this field. The essays recall the barriers that the first pop culture scholars faced and tracks their achievements.

Andrew M. Greeley

The Mysteries of Grace

Author: Allienne R. Becker

Publisher: Allienne Becker

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 521

Andrew M. Greeley's Blackie Ryan stories are reviewed and explicated in this study of the author's novels featuring the delightful and leprechaun like detective. The book surveys detective fiction in which the unique, irrestible, and sometimes irrepressible Blackie Ryan, who is sometimes, but not always, a persona for the author, appears. A composite portrait of Blackie is drawn for the reader. The themes—both sociological and religious—that occur in the fiction are highlighted and explored, as are the various literary devices that the author employs to create his stories. The book includes a "Foreword" written by Andrew M. Greeley, world renowned sociologist, priest, and Professor of Social Science at the university of Chicago.

American Mystery and Detective Novels

A Reference Guide

Author: Larry Landrum

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 273

View: 995

A guide to research on American mystery and detective novels emphasizing the historical development of the genre and major critical approaches to the literature.

Investigating Arthur Upfield

A Centenary Collection of Critical Essays

Author: Carol Hetherington

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 297

View: 927

Arthur Upfield created Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte (Bony) who features in twenty-nine novels written from the 1920s to the the 1960s, mostly set in the Australian Outback. He was the first Australian professional writer of crime detection novels. Upfield arrived in Australia from England on 4 November 1911, and this collection of twenty-two critical essays by academics and scholars has been published to celebrate the centenary of his arrival. The essays were all written after Upfield’s death in 1964 and provide a wide range of responses to his fiction. The contributors, from Australia, Europe and the United States, include journalist Pamela Ruskin who was Upfield’s agent for fifteen years, anthropologists, literary scholars, pioneers in the academic study of popular culture such as John G. Cawelti and Ray B. Browne, and novelists Tony Hillerman and Mudrooroo whose own works have been inspired by Upfield’s. The collection sheds light on the extent and nature of critical responses to Upfield over time, demonstrates the type of recognition he has received and highlights the way in which different preoccupations and critical trends have dealt with his work. The essays provide the basis for an assessment of Upfield’s place not only in the international annals of crime fiction but also in the literary and cultural history of Australia.

Arthur W. Upfield

Life and Times of Bony's Man

Author: A. J. Milnor

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 250

View: 789

Both Australia and Arthur W. Upfield (1890-1964) matured together. At the start of the last century, Upfield emigrated to Australia as that nation was gaining independence and identity. The Gallipoli campaign changed both, and both spent the next decades in pursuit of identity, he wandering, Australia finding its own unique place among nations. Arthur W. Upfield lived a life many might envy: unsuccessful student, immigrant (1911), walker, horse breaker and camel driver, soldier, Bushman, fence rider, journalist, intelligence officer, explorer, novelist, swordfisherman, and creator of bi-racial Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte, “Bony”, in novels rivaling the popularity of Sherlock Holmes. Caught between two worlds, like his fictional character, Upfield was thoroughly English and yet also an Australian nationalist describing Outback Australia to the world through his part Aboriginal character. Famous novelists including Tony Hillerman and Stan Jones, to name only two, found a detective model in “Bony”. Australia developed quickly after the Second World War, and Upfield, too, was successful after years of tea, chops and damper, chasing “rabbit, ‘roo and dog”. As Australia developed, Upfield’s Bush, his “Australia Proper”, slowly succumbed to modernization. After the war, Upfield left the Bush to become a successful writer eventually to be published in a wide range of languages and selling books in the millions of copies. The biography relies on letters, papers, and public documents of the period, in Australia, England and America, many unexplored before now, in order to understand the story of his life and that of his true homeland, Australia.