Late Victorian Crime Fiction in the Shadows of Sherlock

Author: C. Clarke

Publisher: Springer

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 221

View: 923

This book investigates the development of crime fiction in the 1880s and 1890s, challenging studies of late-Victorian crime fiction which have given undue prominence to a handful of key figures and have offered an over-simplified analytical framework, thereby overlooking the generic, moral, and formal complexities of the nascent genre.

In the Shadows of Divine Perfection

Derek Walcott's Omeros

Author: Lance Callahan

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 150

View: 332

In the Shadows of Divine Perfection provides an examination of Derek Walcott's Omeros 1990)- the St. Lucian poet's longest work, and the piece that secured his Nobel Laureate-that reveals the deep-seated bond between the root narratives of ancient Greece to the cultural products and practices of the contemporary Caribbean. This book presents the first detailed reading of Walcott's highly controversial attempt to craft a Caribbean master narrative. This book also presents an overview of the poem's ideological orientation and a far-reaching critique of current postcolonial theory. Lance Callahan engages some of the most vexing problems of authenticity by reading Walcott's work alongside ancient Greek literature and culture.

The Hero in the Mirror

From Fear to Fortitude

Author: Sue Grand

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Psychology

Page: 226

View: 494

In times of stress, trauma and crisis—whether on a personal or global scale—it can be all too easy for us to externalize a larger-than-life figure who can assuage our suffering, a Hero who comes to the fore even as we recede into the background. In taking on our collective burden, however, such an omnipotent Hero can actually undermine us, representing as it does the very same characteristics we fail to note in one another. By granting the Hero to power to set things right, we seem to deny it to ourselves, leaving us temporarily lightened but ultimately helpless. In response, Sue Grand deconstructs the myth of the Heroic and argues for the "ordinary hero," a more realistic figure with the same limitations, concerns and fears as the rest of us, but who nonetheless stands up for the greater good in the face of danger, despair and villainy. From the foundation of relational psychoanalysis, Grand incorporates cultural and ethical considerations in her examination of what this ordinary hero might look like, a trip that takes us from the consulting room to right outside our front doors, from the heart of a "civilized" nation to the myriad war-torn regions dappling the globe, both past and present. Along the way we meet individuals whose encounters with adversity range from the mundane to the catastrophic, and learn how they struggle against the dubious concept of the Hero looming large in their lives. Recounting this journey in finely-tuned yet imminently accessible and enjoyable prose, Grand demonstrates that the best place to ultimately find the ordinary hero is within each other: The hero is us.

Peter Pan's Shadows in the Literary Imagination

Author: Kirsten Stirling

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 188

View: 626

This book is a literary analysis of J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan in all its different versions -- key rewritings, dramatisations, prequels, and sequels -- and includes a synthesis of the main critical interpretations of the text over its history. A comprehensive and intelligent study of the Peter Pan phenomenon, this study discusses the book’s complicated textual history, exploring its origins in the Harlequinade theatrical tradition and British pantomime in the nineteenth century. Stirling investigates potential textual and extra-textual sources for Peter Pan, the critical tendency to seek sources in Barrie’s own biography, and the proliferation of prequels and sequels aiming to explain, contextualize, or close off, Barrie’s exploration of the imagination. The sources considered include Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson’s Starcatchers trilogy, Régis Loisel’s six-part Peter Pan graphic novel in French (1990-2004), Andrew Birkin’s The Lost Boys series, the films Hook (1991), Peter Pan (2003) and Finding Neverland (2004), and Geraldine McCaughrean’s "official sequel" Peter Pan in Scarlet (2006), among others.

Music in the Shadows

Noir Musical Films

Author: Sheri Chinen Biesen

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 224

View: 108

Smoke. Shadows. Moody strains of jazz. Welcome to the world of "noir musical" films, where tormented antiheroes and hard-boiled musicians battle obsession and struggle with their music and ill-fated love triangles. Sultry divas dance and sing the blues in shrouded nightclubs. Romantic intrigue clashes with backstage careers. In her pioneering study, Music in the Shadows, film noir expert Sheri Chinen Biesen explores musical films that use film noir style and bluesy strains of jazz to inhabit a disturbing underworld and reveal the dark side of fame and the American Dream. While noir musical films like A Star Is Born include musical performances, their bleak tone and expressionistic aesthetic more closely resemble the visual style of film noir. Their narratives unfold behind a stark noir lens: distorted, erratic angles and imbalanced hand-held shots allow the audience to experience a tortured, disillusioned perspective. While many musicals glamorize the quest for the spotlight in Hollywood's star factory, brooding noir musical films such as Blues in the Night, Gilda, The Red Shoes, West Side Story, and Round Midnight stretch the boundaries of film noir and the musical as film genres collide. Deep shadows, dim lighting, and visual composition evoke moodiness, cynicism, pessimism, and subjective psychological points of view. As in her earlier study of film noir, Blackout: World War II and the Origins of Film Noir, Biesen draws on extensive primary research in studio archives to situate her examination within a historical, industrial, and cultural context. -- Brian Taves, author of Thomas Ince: Hollywood's Independent PioneerThomas Schatz, The University of Texas at Austin

The Absurd Hero in American Fiction

Updike, Styron, Bellow, Salinger

Author: David D. Galloway

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 282

View: 482

When The Absurd Hero in American Fiction was first released in 1966, Granville Hicks praised it in a lead article for the Saturday Review as a sensitive and definitive study of a new trend in postwar American literature. In the years that followed, David Galloway’s analysis of the writings of John Updike, William Styron, Saul Bellow, and J. D. Salinger became a standard critical work, an indispensable tool for readers concerned with contemporary American literature. The New York Times described the book as “a seminal study of the modern literary imagination. David Galloway, himself an established novelist, later extensively revised The Absurd Hero to include authoritative discussions of more than a dozen novels which had appeared since the first revised edition was released in 1970. Among them are John Updike’s Couples, Rabbit Redux, and The Coup; William Styron’s The Confessions of Nat Turner and Sophie’s Choice; and Saul Bellow’s Mr. Sammler’s Planet and Humboldt’s Gift. Through detailed analyses of these works, Galloway demonstrates the continuing relevance of his own provocative concept of the absurd hero and provides important insights into the literary achievements of four of America’s most influential postwar novelists.

The Mosaic of Contemporary Psychiatry in Perspective

Author: Anthony Kales

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN:

Category: Medical

Page: 448

View: 405

Psychiatry has undergone a dynamic evolution in the last 40 years, an evolution to which Dr. Louis West made many contributions. Psychiatry today and Dr. West's career are intertwined in a mosaic of interaction. It is therefore fitting that this compilation of essays in honor of Dr. West is entitled The Mosaic of Contemporary Psychiatry: Current Perspectives. The papers collectively form a snapshot of the field of psychiatry today. Each chapter offers a historical perspective of the topic discussed, followed by a description of modern day issues and a look at the future of psychiatry. This book will enhance the knowledge and technical skills of psychiatrists as well as other clinicians in the mental health care field.

The Saffron Connection

Author: Yvonne Taylor

Publisher: AuthorHouse

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 823

The Saffron Connection is a story about how people’s minds are easily corrupted by money, or the promise of money. Loyalties are forgotten. Previous character traits are bent in a dangerous direction, while the characters become somebody they never intended to be. The story takes place in Italy and stretches to Switzerland and overseas. But are humans able to learn from their missteps?

Light in the Shadows

Author: A. Meredith Walters

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN:

Category: Fiction

Page: 352

View: 838

In the bestselling sequel to Find You in the Dark, A. Meredith Walters continues the emotional story of Maggie, Clay, and the power of unconditional love. How do you keep going when you feel like your life is over? Maggie never thought she’d see Clay again. So, she attempts to put her life back together after her heart has been shattered to pieces. Moving on and moving forward, just as Clay wanted her to. Clay never stopped thinking of Maggie. Even after ripping their lives apart and leaving her behind to get the help he so desperately needed. He is healing…slowly. But his heart still belongs to the girl who tried to save him. When a sudden tragedy brings Maggie and Clay face-to-face again, nothing is the same. Yet some things never change. Can the darkness that threatened to consume them be transformed into something else and finally give them what they always wanted? And can two people who fought so hard to be together, finally find their happiness? Or will their demons and fear drive them apart for good? The thing about love is that even when it destroys you, it has a way of mending what is broken. And in the shadows, you can still see the light.