Heath Robinson's Great War

Author: W. Heath Robinson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 755

W. Heath Robinson is best known for his hilarious drawings of zany contraptions, though his work ranged across a wide variety of topics covering many aspects of British life in the decades following the First World War. Starting out as a watercolour artist, he quickly turned to the more lucrative field of book illustration and developed his forte in satirical drawings and cartoons. He was regularly commissioned by the editors of Tatler and The Sketch and in great demand from advertising companies. Collections of his drawings were subsequently published in many different editions and became so successful as to transform Heath Robinson into a household name, celebrated for his eccentric brand of British humour. Heath Robinson drew many cartoons lampooning the excesses of the First World War and poking fun at the German army, bringing welcome comic relief to British soldiers and civilians. This book presents his complete First World War satire, from ridiculous weapons such as 'Button Magnets' to aeronautical antics and a demonstration of how to have a 'Quiet Cup of Tea at the Front.'

It's All a Bit Heath Robinson

Re-inventing the First World War

Author: Lucinda Gosling

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 917

Heath Robinson is one of the most famous British inventors of all time. This book pays tribute to his quirky take on World War I.Heath Robinson remains one of Britain's most famous inventors, inspiring the phrase "it's all a bit Heath Robinson", describing any implausible and unnecessarily complex contraption. He is also well-known in the United States where the phrase means any temporary fix. He was born in London and his first talent was illustrating and cartoons. But it was his love of inventing that was to win him fame and during World War I he was to produce some of the quirkiest cartoons for some of the strangest weapons ever thought of. From his Kaiser's campaigning car to his idea for Cat-moo-flage to protect civilians from air raids, his cartoons are a fantastical take on the technology of World War I. Sadly, his inventions were rejected by the Inventions Board, but he was loved by the public and remains a legendary figure to this day. This is the first book to bring his World War I cartoons together. A beautiful gift book that will delight any World War I enthusiast.

It's All a Bit Heath Robinson

Re-Inventing the First World War

Author: Lucinda Gosling

Publisher: History PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 648

William Heath Robinson remains one of Britain's best-loved illustrators and has embedded himself into English vernacular, inspiring the phrase 'it's all a bit Heath Robinson' to describe any precarious or unnecessarily complex contraption. Born in London, he originally had ambitions to be a landscape painter, but would establish his artistic reputation as a book illustrator during the genre's so-called golden age. It was his association with weekly illustrated magazine The Sketch that was to launch and cement his legacy as a humorous artist. Combining a distinctive draughtsmanship with a curious and ingenious mind, the advent of the First World War inspired Heath Robinson to dream up a series of increasingly outlandish and bizarre military inventions with which the opposing armies would try to outwit each other. From the kaiser's campaigning car or a suggestion for an armoured bayonet curler, to post-war 'unbullying' of beef, his cartoons are a fantastically absurd take on wartime technology and home-front life.

The Great War with Germany, 1890-1914

Fictions and Fantasies of the War-to-come

Author: Ignatius Frederick Clarke

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 440

View: 789

In the second of a series of anthologies on future war stories, the leading specialist in the field presents a selection of prophetic tales about the conflict-to-come between the British and the Germans, tales which had immense influence in the quarter-century before the First World War. An extensive range of contemporary illustrations is included.

Some 'Frightful' War Pictures - Illustrated by W. Heath Robinson

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 52

View: 912

A fantastic collection of W. Heath Robinson's drawing depicting humorous wartime scenes from World War I. These 24 full page drawings originally appeared in 'The Sketch' and in 'The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News'. W. Heath Robinson was an English cartoonist and illustrator, best known for drawings of ridiculously complicated machines - for achieving deceptively simple objectives. Such was (and is) his fame, that the term 'Heath Robinson' entered the English language during the First World War, as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contrivance.

American Cinematographers in the Great War, 1914-1918

Author: James W. Castellan

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 320

View: 597

At the start of hostilities in World War I, when the United States was still neutral, American newsreel companies and newspapers sent a new kind of journalist, the film correspondent, to Europe to record the Great War. These pioneering cameramen, accustomed to carrying the Kodaks and Graflexes of still photography, had to lug cumbersome equipment into the trenches. Facing dangerous conditions on the front, they also risked summary execution as supposed spies while navigating military red tape, censorship, and the business interests of the film and newspaper companies they represented. Based on extensive research in European and American archives, American Cinematographers in the Great War, 1914–1918 follows the adventures of these cameramen as they managed to document and film the atrocities around them in spite of enormous difficulties.

Air Raids on South-West Essex in the Great War

Looking for Zeppelins at Leyton

Author: Alan Simpson

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 155

A quarter of a century before the Blitz of 1940, the inhabitants of south-west Essex were terrorized by an earlier aerial menace. Over the course of four years, German Zeppelins, Gothas and Giants flew above their homes, unleashing hundreds of highly explosive and incendiary bombs on London. During three of these raids, bombs were dropped on Leyton and many others landed elsewhere in south-west Essex. These early air raids are now largely forgotten in local memory, but for the inhabitants of the time the attacks were unprecedented, unexpected and lethal. In the years since the Great War a great deal of literature has been published on London's first air raids and about the defence network that evolved around the metropolis, but what happened in the capital's eastern suburbs and the nearby Essex countryside has received less coverage. This meticulously researched and insightful book attempts to put that right, looking at the area which, in 1914, was part of south-west Essex, but now comprises the London boroughs of Waltham Forest, Redbridge, Havering, Newham, and Barking and Dagenham. Focussing in particular on Leyton and Ilford, this is the first book to ever examine what happened before and after the raiders reached and bombarded the capital. The author has included a wide range of contemporary letters, diaries and newspaper reports from local sources, plus several previously unseen photographs. To set the story in its wider context, the book also contains a wealth of information about the defence of the London area generally and vivid reports from combatants on both sides.

The Art of William Heath Robinson

Author: Dulwich Picture Gallery

Publisher: Paul Holberton Pub

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 143

View: 610

"In the 1930s, William Heath Robinson (1872-1944) was known as "the gadget king" and he is still most widely remembered for his wonderfully humorous drawings and illustrations of highly ingenious contraptions. This book includes over a hundred of his original works." "Robinson's ambition was to become a landscape painter but he was forced to follow his brothers into book illustration, where his reputation was rapidly established. The creator of inimitable illustrations for poetry by Poe and Kipling, Andersen's Fairy Tales, A Midsummer Night's Dream, de la Mare's Peacock Pie, The Water Babies, and Perrault's Fairy Tales, he is ranked alongside Rackham and Dulac, achieving classic status around the world. He is also loved for the children's books that he both wrote and illustrated, The Adventures of Uncle Lubin and Bill the Minder."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved