Heath Robinson's Great War

Author: W. Heath Robinson

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Art

Page: 160

View: 364

W. Heath Robinson is best known for his hilarious drawings of zany contraptions, though his work ranged across a wide variety of topics covering many aspects of British life in the decades following the First World War. Starting out as a watercolour artist, he quickly turned to the more lucrative field of book illustration and developed his forte in satirical drawings and cartoons. He was regularly commissioned by the editors of Tatler and The Sketch and in great demand from advertising companies. Collections of his drawings were subsequently published in many different editions and became so successful as to transform Heath Robinson into a household name, celebrated for his eccentric brand of British humour. Heath Robinson drew many cartoons lampooning the excesses of the First World War and poking fun at the German army, bringing welcome comic relief to British soldiers and civilians. This book presents his complete First World War satire, from ridiculous weapons such as 'Button Magnets' to aeronautical antics and a demonstration of how to have a 'Quiet Cup of Tea at the Front.'

It's All a Bit Heath Robinson

Re-inventing the First World War

Author: Lucinda Gosling in association with Mary Evans Picture Library

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN:

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 144

View: 755

William Heath Robinson remains one of Britain’s best-loved illustrators and has embedded himself into English vernacular, inspiring the phrase ‘it’s all a bit Heath Robinson’ to describe any precarious or unnecessarily complex contraption.Born in London, he originally had ambitions to be a landscape painter, but would establish his artistic reputation as a book illustrator during the genre’s so-called golden age. It was his association with weekly illustrated magazine The Sketch that was to launch and cement his legacy as a humorous artist. Combining a distinctive draughtsmanship with a curious and ingenious mind, the advent of the First World War inspired Heath Robinson to dream up a series of increasingly outlandish and bizarre military inventions with which the opposing armies would try to outwit each other. From the kaiser’s campaigning car or a suggestion for an armoured bayonet curler, to post-war ‘unbullying’ of beef, his cartoons are a fantastically absurd take on wartime technology and home-front life. Sadly, his inventions were rejected by a (fictitious) ‘Inventions Board’, but the charm and eccentricity of his ideas was loved by the public and he remains to this day one of the finest exponents of humorous British art.

It's All a Bit Heath Robinson

Re-Inventing the First World War

Author: Lucinda Gosling

Publisher: History PressLtd

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 181

William Heath Robinson remains one of Britain's best-loved illustrators and has embedded himself into English vernacular, inspiring the phrase 'it's all a bit Heath Robinson' to describe any precarious or unnecessarily complex contraption. Born in London, he originally had ambitions to be a landscape painter, but would establish his artistic reputation as a book illustrator during the genre's so-called golden age. It was his association with weekly illustrated magazine The Sketch that was to launch and cement his legacy as a humorous artist. Combining a distinctive draughtsmanship with a curious and ingenious mind, the advent of the First World War inspired Heath Robinson to dream up a series of increasingly outlandish and bizarre military inventions with which the opposing armies would try to outwit each other. From the kaiser's campaigning car or a suggestion for an armoured bayonet curler, to post-war 'unbullying' of beef, his cartoons are a fantastically absurd take on wartime technology and home-front life.

Achieving Success with the Engineering Dissertation

Author: Petra Gratton

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN:

Category: Science

Page: 279

View: 487

This book guides the student reader in preparing their dissertation or major project, including both report and presentation, and explains how to use them as a bridge to the "next big thing" - the graduate's first job, or their next degree. The dissertation is the single most important component of an engineering degree, not only carrying the most marks, but bridging from academic study to professional practice. Achieving Success with the Engineering Dissertation describes the different types of dissertation, how to pick the best project and how a student can prepare themselves to succeed with their own dissertation. The authors explain how best to plan and execute the project, including the roles of the student, supervisor and project sponsor, and what they should expect from each other. Further material includes details of competitions that can be entered with dissertation projects, presentation of data, using the dissertation in job interviews, and creating research publications. Achieving Success with the Engineering Dissertation will be of use to both undergraduate and postgraduate students in all fields of Engineering, and to their supervisors.

Some 'Frightful' War Pictures - Illustrated by W. Heath Robinson

Author:

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Humor

Page: 52

View: 253

A fantastic collection of W. Heath Robinson's drawing depicting humorous wartime scenes from World War I. These 24 full page drawings originally appeared in 'The Sketch' and in 'The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News'. W. Heath Robinson was an English cartoonist and illustrator, best known for drawings of ridiculously complicated machines - for achieving deceptively simple objectives. Such was (and is) his fame, that the term 'Heath Robinson' entered the English language during the First World War, as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contrivance.

The Great War with Germany, 1890-1914

Fictions and Fantasies of the War-to-come

Author: Ignatius Frederick Clarke

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN:

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 440

View: 260

In the second of a series of anthologies on future war stories, the leading specialist in the field presents a selection of prophetic tales about the conflict-to-come between the British and the Germans, tales which had immense influence in the quarter-century before the First World War. An extensive range of contemporary illustrations is included.

Bill the Minder - Illustrated by W. Heath Robinson

Author: W. Heath Robinson

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Juvenile Fiction

Page: 304

View: 169

This wonderful story 'Bill the Minder' follows the adventures of 15-year-old Bill and his cousins, Boadicea and Chad. In the process of their adventures they meet multitude weird and wonder characters such as The Ancient Marina, The Triplets, The Doctor, The Real Soldier and The Lost Grocer. They encounter various unique problems on their way which they solve the use of fantastic machines crafted by Bill. This classic story is accompanied by 16 incredible colour illustrations many black and white woodcuts by W. Heath Robinson an English cartoonist and illustrator, best known for drawings of ridiculously complicated machines – for achieving deceptively simple objectives. Such was (and is) his fame, that the term ‘Heath Robinson’ entered the English language during the First World War, as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contrivance. This book was originally published in 1912 and was later televised as a series during the 1980s. We are republishing it here as part of our ‘Pook Press’ imprint, celebrating the golden age of illustration in children’s literature.

With Haig on the Somme

A Story of the Great War

Author: Herbert Strang

Publisher:

ISBN:

Category: Somme, 1st Battle of the, France, 1916

Page: 283

View: 229

A Song of the English - Illustrated by W. Heath Robinson

Author: Rudyard Kipling

Publisher: Read Books Ltd

ISBN:

Category: Poetry

Page: 172

View: 258

This edition of Kipling’s "The Song of the English" was originally published in November 1909. It included the six subsidiary poems: The Coastwise Lights, The Song of the Dead, The Deep-Sea Cables, The Song of the Sons, The Song of the Cities, and England's Answer. The theme underlying much of this collection, is that the English are the Chosen under the Lord, so long as they obey the Law. This is one of Kipling’s earliest verses specifically setting out his vision of the British Empire, and the duties which it imposes on the English (British) people. His definition of 'the English' is wide, certainly embracing the people of the overseas Empire, Australia, New Xealand, Canada, South Africa, but arguably also the Americans. These classic poems are accompanied by thirty incredible colour illustrations and many beautiful and intricate black and white drawings by W. Heath Robinson. An English cartoonist and illustrator, best known for drawings of ridiculously complicated machines – for achieving deceptively simple objectives. Such was (and is) his fame, that the term ‘Heath Robinson’ entered the English language during the First World War, as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contrivance.